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Los Angeles Overcrowding

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Under mounting pressure to prevent new environmental problems, some of the most faithful believers in new growth at Los Angeles City Hall are acknowledging that closer controls on development in the city have become unavoidable. The pressure has come in the way of warnings from regulatory bodies, including the federal Environmental Protection Agency, that Los Angeles officials may be held responsible for the smog and ocean pollution attributable to the city's rising population.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Under mounting pressure to prevent new environmental problems, some of the most faithful believers in new growth at Los Angeles City Hall are acknowledging that closer controls on development in the city have become unavoidable. The pressure has come in the way of warnings from regulatory bodies, including the federal Environmental Protection Agency, that Los Angeles officials may be held responsible for the smog and ocean pollution attributable to the city's rising population.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1990
The excellent Stanford University professors' article ties neatly with the front-page article published the same day "Border Wars Raging Over Lincoln Boulevard Development". Overpopulation and the resulting destruction of the environment and exhaustion of natural resources exist here in Los Angeles. Overcrowding, traffic jams, noise, overflowing sewer lines, polluted air, insufficient water supply, overcrowded schools, crime, lack of public transportation and plenty more are here already.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1999 | JEAN MERL and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a setback to groups trying to break away from Los Angeles city schools, proponents of a new district for the South Bay city of Lomita failed to muster crucial support from the State Board of Education on Thursday. Lomita's request to hold an election on its proposal to carve a 2,000-student, three-school system from the Los Angeles Unified School District garnered only three yes votes--half of what it needed--from the 11-member board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2011 | By David G. Savage and Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that California must remove tens of thousands of inmates from its prison rolls in the next two years, and state officials vowed to comply, saying they hoped to do so without setting any criminals free. Administration officials expressed confidence that their plan to shift low-level offenders to county jails and other facilities, already approved by lawmakers, would ease the persistent crowding that the high court said Monday had caused "needless suffering and death" and amounted to cruel and unusual punishment.
NEWS
April 5, 1998 | LOIS ROMANO, THE WASHINGTON POST
At the Wal-Mart on Walnut Street, shelves brim with 20 varieties of hot peppers and hundreds of pounds of cornmeal for tortillas. Soccer fields bustle with 22 adult Latino teams--up from none five years ago. Four new public schools have sprung up in three years, 20 language teachers have been added to the payroll, and a new high school is planned. And in the windows of shops all over this small northwest Arkansas city, large signs announce: Se Habla Espanol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1994 | DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 12:40 p.m., the race begins. Hundreds of students bolt toward the school cafeteria, forming lines that snake around the rows of benches crammed in the busy lunchroom. The crush of teen-agers waiting anxiously for their meal come from all over the world: Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, India, Korea, Mexico, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. Various languages ring through the room as students chat with friends and pick up trays of fried chicken.
NEWS
February 20, 1994 | DIANE SEO
At 12:40 p.m., the race begins. Hundreds of students bolt toward the school cafeteria, forming lines that snake around the rows of benches crammed in the busy lunch room. The crush of teen-agers waiting anxiously for their meal come from all over the world: Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, India, South Korea, Mexico, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. Various languages ring through the room as students chat with friends and pick up trays of fried chicken.
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