Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles Police Commission
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Police Commission

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1994
The Los Angeles Police Commission, as part of a series of hearings on the progress of reform measures in the LAPD, has scheduled a special session for today. It will take place at 4 p.m. in the commission hearing room at Parker Center and will address personnel issues raised by the Christopher Commission in its 1991 study of the LAPD. Commissioners are expected to review the LAPD's progress toward meeting the Christopher panel's recommendations regarding personnel.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Robert Greene
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors can set up a citizens' oversight commission that's meant to keep tabs on the sheriff, but it can't imbue that commission with any power that the board itself doesn't already have. The sheriff is an independently elected official, with powers established by the state Constitution. The board has no legal power to compel him to appear, testify, turn over documents, answer questions; so any oversight commission the board appoints would similarly lack that authority.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1992
The Los Angeles Police Commission has scheduled a special meeting on Friday to amend a report on the Police Department's controversial K9 unit. The commission is expected to discuss the way the search dogs are trained in the 17-member unit, and to add language to its report that encourages a "find and bark method" over the "find and bite" style traditionally used in the department. The 46-page report, which includes nine recommendations, was adopted Tuesday at the commission's regular meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
The Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday revised the way it evaluates police shootings, tying an officer's use of deadly force to his or her actions in the moments leading up to the incident. The unanimous decision by the civilian panel that oversees the Los Angeles Police Department was made to bring the department in line with current legal standards. It also is expected to clarify commission rules that in the past have led to confusion over how the panel evaluates some officers who fire their weapons or use other deadly force.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1995
The Los Angeles Police Commission met in closed session at the exclusive California Club Monday evening to discuss its investigation of alleged misconduct by Police Chief Willie L. Williams. The investigation entered its conclusive phase last week when the commission questioned Williams for hours behind closed doors. Commission spokeswoman Elena Stern said she understood that the private club in downtown Los Angeles had been chosen because of its central location.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1995
The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the president of the Police Commission and Southwest Airlines after the commissioner allegedly flashed a badge to slip past airport security. Enrique Hernandez Jr. and Southwest both could face fines for the Jan. 27 incident at Los Angeles International Airport, said FAA spokesman Fred O'Donnell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1992 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters on Tuesday led about 20 angry residents of the Imperial Courts housing project to the Los Angeles Police Commission, where they accused police of continually harassing and abusing tenants in the sprawling complex. "Please call off the dogs," the Los Angeles Democrat told commission members. "Keep them from abusing the people." Waters and the residents alleged that, since the Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1997 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's an age-old question: How old is too old to be a cop? The Los Angeles Police Commission is scheduled to review a proposal next week, supported by new Chief Bernard C. Parks, that would require the LAPD to limit hiring of new recruits to those under 35. The department's previous age restriction was lifted in 1992 to conform with federal anti-discrimination laws. But last year, President Clinton signed a bill that again allows age restrictions for new law enforcement officers and firefighters.
NEWS
May 22, 1988
Applause for the excellent and unwarped coverage in your story "Armed and Ordinary." Officials such as the Los Angeles Police Commission can be compared to the owners of the Titanic who thought they had created something so good, they didn't provide lifeboats for everybody. CHARLES F. WETHERBEE Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2007 | From Times Staff Reports
The Los Angeles Police Commission announced Tuesday that it would conduct a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. April 30 at a site to be announced so residents can comment on the request by Police Chief William J. Bratton for another five-year term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013
Join Times staff writer Richard Winton on Tuesday at 9 a.m. for a L.A. Now Live chat about a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge who has made claims of excessive force by the UCLA Police Department. David S. Cunningham III is not only a judge but the former president of the Los Angeles Police Commission and a onetime federal civil rights attorney. Winton reported  that Cunningham found himself handcuffed in the back of a UCLA police car on Saturday morning. Officers had pulled him over as he was driving his Mercedes out of his Westwood gym because, police said, he wasn't wearing his seat belt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2012 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
Over the objections of some civil liberties groups, the Los Angeles Police Commission approved controversial new guidelines Tuesday for when LAPD officers can document suspicious behavior they believe could be linked to terrorism. The five-member civilian oversight panel unanimously approved a special order that gives officers the authority to write reports on people whose actions might not break any laws, such as taking a photograph of a power plant. The LAPD revised its policy in response to criticism so that officers are now specifically forbidden to engage in racial and other profiling and the department is required to conduct regular audits of the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2012 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
Last year, as the number of police shootings soared, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck repeatedly gave his bosses and the public an explanation: Officers were discharging their weapons more because they were coming under attack more. He bolstered his assertion with LAPD statistics that showed an increase in the number of assaults on officers. But an independent LAPD watchdog now contends there was no link between the dramatic rise in officer-involved shootings and assaults on officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2010 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
The independent watchdog of the Los Angeles Police Department vowed Tuesday to tackle a backlog of public reports on police shootings and other violent encounters with suspects. Nicole Bershon, the newly selected inspector general of the Los Angeles Police Commission, told commission members that her staff would attempt to publish five of the neglected reports each week in a bid to erase the entrenched backlog. There are about 240 cases for which reports have not be done. Four years ago, the commission that oversees the LAPD instructed Bershon's predecessor to publish a report on every case in which an officer fires his weapon, strikes someone on the head or uses other types of serious force.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2010 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Police Commission has failed to publicly disclose its findings on at least 240 police shootings and other violent encounters with suspects, despite a promise four years ago to be more transparent and post its decisions on the Internet, a Times review has found. Included in those cases are more than 20 incidents in which a person died while in police custody and at least 46 others in which police shot someone, according to the review. Among the unreported decisions are at least a dozen cases in which the commission ruled that the officer had improperly used deadly force and should be disciplined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2009 | Joel Rubin and Phil Willon
When the Los Angeles Police Commission last week gave Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa the names of the finalists for the LAPD chief's job, it was hardly a foregone conclusion that Deputy Chief Charlie Beck would be the eventual winner. In fact, among the three finalists, the commission ranked Beck last. Though many had anointed Beck early on as the favorite to win the job, the outcome behind closed doors, where decisions were actually made, could easily have been different. Beck had to overcome a surging dark horse candidate and a highly regarded department veteran, according to sources close to the selection who asked that their names not be used because the process was confidential.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2006 | From Times Staff Reports
The Los Angeles Police Commission met for three hours Tuesday in a closed-door session with Chief William J. Bratton as part of his annual performance evaluation. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, meanwhile, voiced confidence in the chief but asked the panel to judge Bratton based on whether he continues to reduce crime, increase the police force and comply with a consent decree mandating reforms. Emerging from the meeting, Bratton smiled and told reporters, "I think we did OK."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2009 | Phil Willon
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa will select a new police chief at a time when crime is declining and the city is enjoying a prolonged respite from racial strife, sparing him from the political perils that bloodied the three previous mayors facing similiar appointments. Even the potential gift of a controversy-free selection process, however, does little to diminish the pressure on Villaraigosa to name a successor capable of measuring up to William J. Bratton. The outgoing police chief is largely credited with transforming the LAPD into a more effective and accountable agency that has salved decades of animosity with minorities in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2009 | Joel Rubin
As the Los Angeles Police Commission meets today to begin interviews with candidates vying to become LAPD's next chief, four department insiders who were early favorites remain leading contenders, according to city, community and law enforcement leaders monitoring the confidential selection process. The top candidates, most officials say, are Assistant Chiefs Jim McDonnell, Earl Paysinger and Sharon Papa and Deputy Chief Charlie Beck. Beck, a 32-year veteran of the force who has established a strong reputation among the LAPD rank and file and civic leaders alike for being both a tough cop and progressive thinker on crime, is widely perceived to have gained a slight advantage over the others.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|