Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles Police Commission
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Police Commission

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2006 | Patrick McGreevy and Richard Winton, Times Staff Writers
Melanie E. Lomax, a longtime civil rights lawyer and former head of the Los Angeles Police Commission, was killed late Sunday in a single-car accident near her Hollywood Hills home, police said Monday. Lomax, 56, was declared dead at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where she was taken by paramedics after the 2005 Jaguar she was driving rolled down her driveway and tumbled 20 feet down a steep embankment. Police sources said Lomax may have had a heart attack.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1993
The Los Angeles Police Commission voted Tuesday to approve an ambitious plan for expanding the Los Angeles Police Department and to request $14.9 million to begin implementing it. The plan, which was unveiled last month by Mayor Richard Riordan, calls for expanding the LAPD by 2,855 officers during the next five years. It also proposes beefing up the department's street presence by hiring more civilians to free up officers and by paying officers to work overtime and on their days off.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2012 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
Last year, as the number of police shootings soared, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck repeatedly gave his bosses and the public an explanation: Officers were discharging their weapons more because they were coming under attack more. He bolstered his assertion with LAPD statistics that showed an increase in the number of assaults on officers. But an independent LAPD watchdog now contends there was no link between the dramatic rise in officer-involved shootings and assaults on officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2001
Developer Rick Caruso said Friday that he had turned down Mayor Richard Riordan's request to take Gerald Chaleff's place on the Los Angeles Police Commission. Caruso said he was "deeply honored" that the mayor asked him to serve on the civilian oversight panel, but wants to continue his work on the city's Department of Water and Power commission. "I feel compelled to remain on the board to help craft a statewide solution to our energy crisis," Caruso said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|