Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles Police Commission
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Police Commission

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2006 | From Times Staff Reports
The Los Angeles Police Commission met for three hours Tuesday in a closed-door session with Chief William J. Bratton as part of his annual performance evaluation. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, meanwhile, voiced confidence in the chief but asked the panel to judge Bratton based on whether he continues to reduce crime, increase the police force and comply with a consent decree mandating reforms. Emerging from the meeting, Bratton smiled and told reporters, "I think we did OK."
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1993
The Los Angeles Police Commission voted Tuesday to approve an ambitious plan for expanding the Los Angeles Police Department and to request $14.9 million to begin implementing it. The plan, which was unveiled last month by Mayor Richard Riordan, calls for expanding the LAPD by 2,855 officers during the next five years. It also proposes beefing up the department's street presence by hiring more civilians to free up officers and by paying officers to work overtime and on their days off.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013
Join Times staff writer Richard Winton on Tuesday at 9 a.m. for a L.A. Now Live chat about a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge who has made claims of excessive force by the UCLA Police Department. David S. Cunningham III is not only a judge but the former president of the Los Angeles Police Commission and a onetime federal civil rights attorney. Winton reported  that Cunningham found himself handcuffed in the back of a UCLA police car on Saturday morning. Officers had pulled him over as he was driving his Mercedes out of his Westwood gym because, police said, he wasn't wearing his seat belt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2012 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
Last year, as the number of police shootings soared, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck repeatedly gave his bosses and the public an explanation: Officers were discharging their weapons more because they were coming under attack more. He bolstered his assertion with LAPD statistics that showed an increase in the number of assaults on officers. But an independent LAPD watchdog now contends there was no link between the dramatic rise in officer-involved shootings and assaults on officers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|