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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1989
A native of Seoul has become the highest ranking officer of Korean descent in Los Angeles Police Department history, a spokesman said Tuesday. Paul Kim, 37, was promoted from sergeant to lieutenant earlier this month, said police spokesman Don Lawrence. The department, which has been the target of numerous lawsuits over its hiring and promotion of minorities, has made an effort recently to bolster its minority ranks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1989
A native of Seoul has become the highest ranking officer of Korean descent in Los Angeles Police Department history, a spokesman said Tuesday. Paul Kim, 37, was promoted from sergeant to lieutenant earlier this month, said police spokesman Don Lawrence. The department, which has been the target of numerous lawsuits over its hiring and promotion of minorities, has made an effort recently to bolster its minority ranks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1991
For the first time in the Los Angeles Police Department's history, a woman has been named to command a division. Janice Carlson, a 25-year veteran of the department, officially took over operations at the LAPD's Pacific Division Wednesday, replacing Capt. John Wilbanks, who retired last month, according to a department statement. Carlson's service includes command assignments at the Narcotics Division and the Internal Affairs Division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2008 | Joanna Lin, Lin is a Times staff writer.
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday awarded $2.25 million to a police officer who said she was discriminated against and sexually harassed by her male colleagues and supervisors, and then retaliated against when she complained.
NEWS
February 12, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after Christmas, rookie Officer Tina Kerbrat received the grim assignment of driving a murder victim's mother back to the North Hollywood station and questioning the grief-stricken woman about her son. The task left the 34-year-old mother of two shaken, fellow Officer Alicia Green recalled Monday as she struggled to accept Kerbrat's own violent death hours earlier. "She was extremely upset seeing the mother in that way," said Green, who was one of Kerbrat's Police Academy classmates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2000 | CARLA RIVERA and JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Pico Rivera they spoke of healing and moving forward. In Los Angeles, they marched through the streets in the Rampart area and gathered in a show of solidarity in front of the police station that has become the focal point for the biggest scandal in the Los Angeles Police Department's history.
NEWS
December 13, 1988 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Three Los Angeles police officers speeding to assist detectives in an arrest on Skid Row were killed early Monday when their two cruisers collided, sending one careening into a metal light pole and the other into a deep trench at a construction site. Authorities called it the worst accident in Los Angeles Police Department history. Never before have three members of the force been killed at one time. "It's a terrible loss," said Police Chief Daryl F. Gates.
OPINION
October 7, 2008
For an arrogant thug of limited intelligence, O.J. Simpson has given us much to think about over the years. This past weekend, his first in custody in awhile, presented yet another opportunity. The two most serious crimes for which he's stood trial were very different. One was a stick-up in a Las Vegas hotel room, an armed faceoff over sports memorabilia. The other left a young man and woman in a pool of their own blood outside a quiet condominium in Brentwood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2005 | Andrew Blankstein and Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writers
After a 12-week trial that ended with jurors saying they did not believe two Hollywood stuntmen central to the prosecution's case, actor Robert Blake was found not guilty Wednesday of fatally shooting his wife. Prosecutors "couldn't put the gun in his hand," said jury foreman Thomas Nicholson. "I felt the primary thing from what I saw was that the circumstantial evidence was flimsy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 75 years, the body of Officer Charles P. Williams has lain in an unmarked grave, his sacrifice to the city forgotten, his place in Los Angeles Police Department history unnoticed. This month, all of that will change. Later this month, a ceremony will commemorate Williams' death.
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