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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1991 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles police officer assigned to the West Valley Division was sentenced to a year in federal prison Tuesday after admitting he kept illegal weapons, including a machine gun and a silencer, hidden in his home. In a statement to U.S. District Court Judge Michael Byrne before he was sentenced, Officer Michael Edelstein portrayed himself as "nothing more than a gun collector" and cited his 10-year police career in asking for leniency.
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NEWS
April 13, 1992 | FRANK CLIFFORD and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At first, the campaign to amend the City Charter figured to be a clash of two powerful men and the different Los Angeles each represents. On the side of change, Warren Christopher, the patrician liberal, speaks for the new, multiethnic city and its desire to have a greater say over its Police Department. On the other stands the embattled top cop, Daryl F. Gates, and a more traditional constituency comfortable with the department's semi-autonomous relationship with City Hall.
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NEWS
April 13, 1992 | FRANK CLIFFORD and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At first, the campaign to amend the City Charter figured to be a clash of two powerful men and the different Los Angeles each represents. On the side of change, Warren Christopher, the patrician liberal, speaks for the new, multiethnic city and its desire to have a greater say over its Police Department. On the other stands the embattled top cop, Daryl F. Gates, and a more traditional constituency comfortable with the department's semi-autonomous relationship with City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1991 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles police officer assigned to the West Valley Division was sentenced to a year in federal prison Tuesday after admitting he kept illegal weapons, including a machine gun and a silencer, hidden in his home. In a statement to U.S. District Court Judge Michael Byrne before he was sentenced, Officer Michael Edelstein portrayed himself as "nothing more than a gun collector" and cited his 10-year police career in asking for leniency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1989
Your article "Federal Cops Plead Poverty" (Part A, Nov. 20) shows just how twisted our priorities are in this country. A grocery checker makes more than a federal Drug Enforcement Administration agent; a starting Los Angeles Police Depatment officer with just a high school education makes even more. But the irony is that they both earn more than a starting teacher with a college degree. Maybe if we "turned the tables," we could attract and keep more excellent teachers. The end result would be a reduced need for police officers and DEA agents.
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