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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that they fear she will be a "political puppet," officials of the union that represents the Los Angeles Police Department's rank-and-file workers said they plan to demonstrate against Barbara Yaroslavsky as she kicks off her campaign to gain her husband's vacant City Council seat. The Police Protective League is targeting Yaroslavsky because union leaders blame her husband, Zev Yaroslavsky, for delaying labor contract talks last year when he was on the council.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that they fear she will be a "political puppet," officials of the union that represents the Los Angeles Police Department's rank-and-file workers said they plan to demonstrate against Barbara Yaroslavsky as she kicks off her campaign to gain her husband's vacant City Council seat. The Police Protective League is targeting Yaroslavsky because union leaders blame her husband, Zev Yaroslavsky, for delaying labor contract talks last year when he was on the council.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying they fear she will be a "political puppet," officials of the union that represents the Los Angeles Police Department's rank and file said they plan to demonstrate against Barbara Yaroslavsky as she kicks off her campaign to gain her husband's vacant City Council seat. The Police Protective League is targeting Yaroslavsky because union leaders blame her husband, Zev, for delaying labor contract talks last year when he was on the council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying they fear she will be a "political puppet," officials of the union that represents the Los Angeles Police Department's rank and file said they plan to demonstrate against Barbara Yaroslavsky as she kicks off her campaign to gain her husband's vacant City Council seat. The Police Protective League is targeting Yaroslavsky because union leaders blame her husband, Zev, for delaying labor contract talks last year when he was on the council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2009 | By Robert Faturechi
A police advocacy group has criticized an appeals court judgment last week overturning a law that prevented violent felons from owning body armor, saying the ruling will put officers and the public in danger. The decade-old ban was enacted after the 1997 North Hollywood shootout, a confrontation between police and two heavily armored bank robbers that injured officers and civilians. The state Legislature passed the ban in 1998 as a measure to protect police. Thursday's ruling by the 2nd District Court of Appeal in Los Angeles overturned the state law, saying it was unconstitutional because the definition of body armor was too vague.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2004 | Nora Zamichow, Times Staff Writer
More than 10 years after the city of Los Angeles agreed to end discrimination against gays and lesbians in the LAPD, the department can be a hostile, even frightening place for homosexual officers. "Most gay officers are still in the closet," said retired Sgt. Mitch Grobeson, 45, who won a court settlement in 1993 requiring the city to provide gay and lesbian officers a discrimination-free workplace. "Those who are openly gay are working in an environment filled with fear."
OPINION
May 2, 1999 | Matt Lait, Matt Lait covers the Los Angeles Police Department for The Times
There is Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks, and then there is Lt. David A. Hepburn--the anti-Parks. As president of the police-officers union since January 1997, Hepburn has found himself in a pitched battle with the chief on matters of discipline, benefits and public safety. While far less known than the chief, Hepburn, a 26-year veteran of the force, is still an influential figure in city-government circles. For many, he is a barometer of the rank and file's mood.
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