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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1993 | BILL BOYARSKY
Will the departure of Tom Bradley, Los Angeles' first black mayor, weaken the political clout of the African-American community and of liberals in general? Or, since the mayor has been such an invisible figure lately, is it possible that his retirement won't make much difference? These are questions that cannot be answered until the new mayor takes over.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013
Just before leaving City Hall after serving the maximum eight years in office, then-Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke at length with Los Angeles Times political reporters Maeve Reston and Michael Finnegan about his legacy and political future. LAT: Everyone is wondering what you'll do next. Accepted any job offers? AV: "The answer is - I said. I made it pretty clear when I ran in 2001 that I really wanted to be mayor - that I was born and raised here; that my family had deep roots here; my grandpa had come 100 years ago. I've been focused on finishing strong all the way to the end. So I don't have a job after this.
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NEWS
March 12, 1993 | ALAN C. MILLER
Henry Waxman has long been a man of almost dual identities. In Washington, the 18-year Democratic congressman from the Westside of Los Angeles is an influential advocate for the poor, the elderly, AIDS patients and environmentalists as chairman of the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on health and environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles mayoral candidates Wendy Greuel and Eric Garcetti have traded bitter campaign attacks for months. At an annual fundraiser for diabetes research Thursday night, they traded jokes. The rivals took the stage at the Los Angeles Political Roast, which brought hundreds of elected leaders, lobbyists and other City Hall power players to the Beverly Hilton to have fun with serious issues like low voter turnout and the city's financial crisis. Their target this year was Councilman Tom LaBonge, who was ribbed for his love of television cameras and his rather ample waist size.
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his purchase of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Rupert Murdoch not only secures a piece of the city's history, but also guarantees himself a place in its future. "Rupert has an enormous interest in the world around him," said Peter Chernin, president and chief executive of News Corp., the parent company of Fox. "And this is the city in which he lives. . . . He likes the ability to have a voice."
NEWS
September 25, 1992 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tom Bradley, the Texas sharecroppers' son who became the first black mayor of Los Angeles and held the job longer than anyone else, declared Thursday that after 19 years in office he will not seek reelection. Speaking in a downtown hotel, the 74-year-old Bradley surprised few in the invited audience of several hundred longtime friends and supporters by saying it was time for a change. "Change allowed me to knock down the old doors of prejudice," he said of his initial election as mayor in 1973.
NEWS
August 23, 1999 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the lexicon of Los Angeles politics, it's called "counting to 300,000." That's roughly the number of votes the political professionals figure it will take to be elected the next mayor of the nation's second-largest city. In one sense, that's hardly any. After all, more than 3 million people live here, so it takes the approval of just one in every 10 to win the city's top office.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | FRANK CLIFFORD and RICH CONNELL and STEPHEN BRAUN and Andrea Ford, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Somehow, somewhere along the line, connections had been frayed and confidence lost. Conceived in the ashes of Watts, this was supposed to be a municipal administration built to absorb ethnic shocks. In a city of so many colors, of so much wealth and poverty, it was expected to keep the peace. But on a single evening in late April, the flames that lighted the Los Angeles sky revealed that despite its multiracial hues, Mayor Tom Bradley's model City Hall was powerless to keep the lid on.
OPINION
January 7, 1990 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin is an international fellow at the Pepperdine School of Business and Management and a senior fellow at the Center for the New West
For the last three decades, the racial politics of Southern California--like much of the nation--revolved around black-white issues. But today this biracial focus is being supplanted by a kaleidoscopic politics reflecting an increasingly diverse population. The rise of various ethnic groups, predominantly Asian and Latino, foreshadows the end of the traditional biracial alliance among white liberals, downtown corporate interests and blacks that has controlled Los Angeles politics for 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1999 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lured by promises of a rosier future, the small, independent cities of San Pedro and Wilmington in 1909 joined themselves to their burgeoning neighbor to the north, port-hungry Los Angeles. Now they might get out again, led by activists in these contrasting harbor-side neighborhoods of picturesque hillsides, historic waterfronts, towering refineries and grimy industrial districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2009 | Joel Rubin
William J. Bratton's announcement Wednesday that he would resign as chief of the Los Angeles Police Department caught Angelenos by surprise, including the mayor and police leaders who suddenly found themselves confronted with the daunting task of replacing one of the nation's most influential law enforcement figures. Bratton's unexpected decision set in motion what promises to be an intense and wide-ranging search for his successor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2008 | Jean-Paul Renaud, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County Supervisor Yvonne B. Burke, who nearly two years ago announced she would retire from one of the region's most powerful elected positions, endorsed Los Angeles City Councilman Bernard C. Parks on Thursday in the hotly contested race to succeed her. The veteran politician's endorsement of Parks, whom she called "dedicated and thorough," comes as the former Los Angeles police chief competes with state Sen.
OPINION
July 22, 2007 | Raphael J. Sonenshein
Religion has always played a significant role in Los Angeles politics, although just which group has the upper hand has changed a number of times over the years. We're now in the third "era" of religion as a political force in the city, in which Catholics are once again playing a vibrant role in the transformation of Los Angeles -- and the $660-million settlement in the clergy abuse scandal seems unlikely to alter the situation much.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2007 | Jim Newton and Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writers
There was a time when Cardinal Roger M. Mahony, leader of the largest Roman Catholic diocese in the United States, was a formidably influential political figure. A decade ago, he was a member of Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan's inner circle and the spiritual leader of a growing community with exponentially expanding power. Today, Mahony remains one of the region's most recognized leaders and a sought-after voice on certain issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2006 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to governing Los Angeles, Antonio Villaraigosa often sounds like a mayor of two minds. He told workers staging a fast for higher wages at a hotel near Los Angeles International Airport last week that a prosperous city must help lift its poor out of poverty. Yet even as he voiced solidarity, saying he stood behind a new law that requires LAX-area hotels to hike wages, he reassured anxious business leaders that the pay increase would not be expanded citywide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2006 | Jim Newton, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County Supervisor Yvonne Brathwaite Burke is coming to the end of a long political run, a once-interrupted 40-year stretch during which she has won 10 elections in the face of changing demographics and crises that have swallowed many of her peers. Barring something unexpected, Burke plans to step down from her seat on the board when her term ends in 2008.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council is parochial and dim, its members occasionally thoughtful but more often preoccupied with personal political advantage. The mayor is smart and well-intentioned, but he misses opportunities to lead. Civic services are reliably available, but undermined by inefficiency and waste. Residents are poorly represented and disconnected from one another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2003 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Thousands of followers, nationally known preachers, government figures and relatives bade farewell Saturday to the late Rev. E.V. Hill at a marathon service steeped in tributes, tears and joyous proclamations of Gospel hope. The outpouring for the 69-year-old preacher and confidant of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. came during an hours-long service at West Angeles Cathedral on Crenshaw Boulevard. Hill was also remembered Friday night at Mt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2005 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
He was L.A.'s top official lawyer; she was his wife. Together, they were powerful players in the city's political backroom deals. They ran the city attorney's office together, and together were convicted of corruption and wound up behind bars. Erwin "Pete" Werner and his wife, "Queen Helen," as she was known in 1930s political circles, were central figures in a liquor-license scandal that reached all the way to Sacramento.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2005 | Michael Finnegan and Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writers
James K. Hahn and Antonio Villaraigosa raced the breadth of Los Angeles on the final Saturday before election day, striving to pull together the patchwork coalition each needs to prevail in their bitterly fought mayoral rematch. Hahn, fighting to keep his job in Tuesday's election, made more than half a dozen stops on the summer-like day, including appearances courting moderate and conservative voters in his home base of San Pedro and in the San Fernando Valley.
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