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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE and BOB POOL, Times Staff Writers
The Italian Renaissance-style structure on Workman Street a few miles east of downtown is an architectural gem, honored as one of Los Angeles' most distinguished buildings when it was constructed in 1916. Since then, the two-story, yellow brick-stucco building has become an integral part of the Lincoln Heights community as a Los Angeles Public Library branch housing about 39,000 books and a public meeting room.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE and BOB POOL, Times Staff Writers
The Italian Renaissance-style structure on Workman Street a few miles east of downtown is an architectural gem, honored as one of Los Angeles' most distinguished buildings when it was constructed in 1916. Since then, the two-story, yellow brick-stucco building has become an integral part of the Lincoln Heights community as a Los Angeles Public Library branch housing about 39,000 books and a public meeting room.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1989
Mayor Tom Bradley and Police Chief Daryl F. Gates ventured to the North Hollywood police station Tuesday to kick off a campaign to support Proposition 2, a $176-million bond issue designed to build new police stations and improve existing facilities throughout Los Angeles if approved by voters April 11. Gates characterized the North Hollywood station--where 40 detectives work in a room about the size of a double garage--as an example of the overcrowding and deterioration Prop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1989
Mayor Tom Bradley and Police Chief Daryl F. Gates ventured to the North Hollywood police station Tuesday to kick off a campaign to support Proposition 2, a $176-million bond issue designed to build new police stations and improve existing facilities throughout Los Angeles if approved by voters April 11. Gates characterized the North Hollywood station--where 40 detectives work in a room about the size of a double garage--as an example of the overcrowding and deterioration Prop.
NEWS
February 6, 1988
Adrian Wilson, chief or associate architect on many landmark downtown Los Angeles public buildings, died Wednesday at a La Crescenta convalescent home. He was 90 and had sold the Adrian Wilson Associates architectural firm he founded in 1929 to TI Corp. After the 1970 sale he remained active as a consultant, said his daughter, Jane Higley.
NEWS
July 9, 1986 | MARYLOUISE OATES, Times Staff Writer
"Hi. I'm with Suzanne," was Dr. Joseph Marx's introduction to the eclectic group of Californians they'd gathered at a wrap-up Liberty Weekend brunch at the Hotel Pierre. From VIP Angelenos, the reviews of the weekend's events were rave.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | LEON WHITESON, Whiteson is a Los Angeles architect and author whose most recent book is "The Watts Towers of Los Angeles."
For criminal prosecutor Terry Siegel, the new Van Nuys Municipal Court is "the prettiest place I've ever worked." The building is so open and cheerful, said Siegel, that "it lightens even the often unpleasant business of prosecution." Designed by the local firm of Dworsky Associates, the $50-million, award-winning facility demonstrates how a functional building can be made graceful by the dignity of its architecture.
REAL ESTATE
April 9, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
"Intuition and Reason in the Design Process," the theme of the 1989 Westweek conference, seemed to baffle many symposium speakers and their audiences. "Only a fool or a genius would attempt to unravel the tangle of intuition and reason in making architecture," declared Japanese architect Kisho Kurokawa as he proceeded to try. Kurokawa shared a podium with French architect Jean Nouvel and Mexican architect Ricardo Legoretta in a symposium on "Important Contemporary Directions in Global Architecture" at the Pacific Design Center.
NEWS
May 26, 1988 | LEON WHITESON
In an age when select designers are singled out as "starchitects," celebrated in magazines and in art gallery retrospectives, it is easy to overlook the good gray brigade who set the style for much of what is being built around us. The spectrum of mainstream designers is wide, ranging from those in large offices with staffs of more than 50 to others who prefer small and highly personal practices with only a few associates.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
Richard Meier sits at a white lacquered table in a light-filled office in Westwood with unadorned white walls. His white shirt matches his collar-length white hair. The bookshelves and telephone are white, as is the single carnation peeking out from a bud vase. Perhaps the world's leading architect, Meier is--not surprisingly--famous for gleaming white buildings covered with porcelain panels. He is also celebrated for making light bend in unusual and interesting ways, for structures that appear to have been dropped from a helicopter into the surrounding landscape and for a formal approach that has won him many more admirers in Europe than in California.
OPINION
September 21, 1997 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt, a contributing editor to Opinion, is vice president and director of the Hajjar and Partners New Media Lab. He spoke with Nikolas Patsaouras over dinner at a Westside restaurant
Historian Kevin Starr calls him "the most influential transportation activist of this generation." He made an unsuccessful run for mayor in 1993. He has built a highly successful electrical engineering firm, spent long hours promoting civic projects and created strong ties to powerful political figures. Yet, few Angelenos would recognize Nikolas Patsaouras, or even know his name.
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