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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2005 | By Carla Rivera
Nearly 10 years ago, a group of Silver Lake residents began a campaign for a public library branch in their quirky community, long noted for its modern architecture, indie rock scene and general air of hipness. The long wait ends today with the grand opening of the Silver Lake branch of the Los Angeles Public Library, a $12-million facility that, with its sleek modern facade, eco-friendly design and cutting-edge technology, embodies the neighborhood zeitgeist. The branch is the first to use an automated book check-in and sorting system with a computerized conveyor belt that will speed book returns.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
After several years in the fiscal wilderness, the Los Angeles Public Library, and California libraries in general, are mounting a comeback. On Jan. 12, Sunday hours were restored at eight of the system's 72 regional branches and at the Central Library downtown. Back in the dark days of 2010, when it seemed everyone was still trying to climb out of the hole of the Great Recession, I visited a branch of the Los Angeles Public Library in East Hollywood. It was the same one where my immigrant father learned to read English in 1962.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Thirty boxes of stuff -- the kind of thing a frustrated spouse might suggest be cleared out of the garage -- is being donated to the L.A. Public Library, which has accepted the lot with much enthusiasm. The boxes belong to Dr. Melvin Schrier, a retired optometrist who now lives in Palos Verdes. Schrier was born in Brooklyn and practiced on Park Avenue in Manhattan; when he started going out on the town, he began saving souvenirs. That was back in 1944, and he kept at it for the next sixty-some years, noting the date on each item.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
There's a new way to get movies, TV shows, music and audiobooks for free on the Internet. And no, it's not piracy -- it's through public libraries.  Hoopla Digital, a Netflix-like service for library card holders, on Wednesday announced agreements with NBCUniversal, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc., National Geographic and BBC America to stream content. Launched this year, Hoopla lets library patrons access its entertainment material through a mobile app or Web browser.  Jeff Jankowski, Hoopla's founder and owner, said the service can help make libraries more convenient for people who are too busy to make the trip to a physical location and more attractive to younger patrons who want to be able to access movies and music whenever and wherever they want.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | ELSTON CARR
The Los Angeles Public Library's "Grandparents and Books" program is seeking volunteers to read to children at 16 public libraries in South and South-Central Los Angeles. The program pairs elementary school children with individuals 50 and older in informal reading tutorials. Adults read to children Monday through Friday from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. After two sessions, children receive free paperback books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1997 | SUSAN KENT, City librarian, Los Angeles
Ms. Murry's essay illustrates the complexities that public libraries all across the U.S. face regarding public access to the Internet in library facilities. Some people have made the assumption that the Internet is a source of moral corruption and that the public library is responsible for monitoring the Net to protect the community's children.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Cristy Lytal, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Although Christopher Nolan's big-budget psychological action movie "Inception" was shot in six countries, art department researcher Dominique Arcadio found much of what she needed to do her job within the aisles of the Los Angeles Public Library. "For every film I've worked on, I've gotten at least 50 books out of the L.A. Public Library," she said. "They're very good about just letting you take out books that should really be reference books. It's one of the best libraries that I've had a chance of using.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2012 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
The gig: As newly appointed city librarian of the Los Angeles Public Library, John Szabo runs the nation's largest public-funded library system, measured by population served. From his corner office atop the Central Library in downtown L.A., the 44-year-old oversees the city's 72 branches, 6.4 million volumes, 3 million photographs, 30,000 electronic volumes and 883 employees. Appointed by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa in June, he reported for duty Aug. 20. A "library person": For some, it takes decades to find their life's calling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
The discovery that real estate agent Matthew Greenberg made when he stepped inside a Mount Washington cottage will put the Los Angeles Public Library on the map. Stashed everywhere in the 948-square-foot tear-down were maps. Tens of thousands of maps. Fold-out street maps were stuffed in file cabinets, crammed into cardboard boxes, lined up on closet shelves and jammed into old dairy crates. Wall-size roll-up maps once familiar to schoolchildren were stacked in corners. Old globes were lined in rows atop bookshelves also filled with maps and atlases.
NEWS
March 23, 1986
The Beverly Hills Public Library now has books in Chinese, Hebrew, Hungarian, Polish and Russian. The collection of about 200 titles is changed every three months under an agreement with the Los Angeles Public Library.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Thirty boxes of stuff -- the kind of thing a frustrated spouse might suggest be cleared out of the garage -- is being donated to the L.A. Public Library, which has accepted the lot with much enthusiasm. The boxes belong to Dr. Melvin Schrier, a retired optometrist who now lives in Palos Verdes. Schrier was born in Brooklyn and practiced on Park Avenue in Manhattan; when he started going out on the town, he began saving souvenirs. That was back in 1944, and he kept at it for the next sixty-some years, noting the date on each item.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Your English teacher and your local librarian are as important in a crisis as a fireman or an ambulance driver. That's the message to be found inside three recent American memoirs, each written by authors whose lives were saved by literature. In these times of austerity and repeated threats of shutdowns and sequesters, it's not easy to be a teacher -- especially one who doesn't teach chemistry or calculus. In the face of reduced budgets, public and school libraries scramble to serve the young people that depend on them.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
On Saturday afternoon, I found myself (along with a crew of librarians, readers and friends of the Los Angeles Public Library) on a boat off the coast of Long Beach, looking for whales. The event was part of “What Ever Happened to Moby Dick?” - a monthlong series of events meant to highlight the relevance of Herman Melville's 1851 novel for a contemporary audience, and especially a Southern California one. “Moby-Dick,” of course, is the story of Captain Ahab and his obsessive quest for the white sperm whale that, in a previous encounter, took his leg. But it is also a white whale in its own right: labyrinthine, elliptical, digressive, a loose grab-bag of a book in which Melville reflects on everything - from cetology to whaling techniques to meditations on mortality and philosophy, all narrated by a crew member who memorably tells us to call him Ishmael in the novel's opening lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Like the nebulous boundaries of Los Angeles itself, encircling the city's musical sound can be tricky business. There are the vibrations of surf and mariachi music, the crawl of Compton G-funk and laid-back '50s cool jazz, Mexican boleros and the ladies (and men) of the canyon, along with K-town K-pop and the rush of Hollywood punk. Around every corner a new rhythm, a fresh melodic burst born under the California sun.  It's a sound that's virtually impossible to put onto one stage, but on Friday night archetypal East L.A. band Ozomatli and fellow artists at Grand Performances in downtown Los Angeles took a stab at it.  By resurrecting age-old songs about Southern California and weaving in more recent but no less revealing odes to the area -- including punk band X's "Los Angeles" and Richie Valens' "La Bamba" -- musicians illustrated the breadth of the region's experience in the open-air California Plaza.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
Another long-neglected Los Angeles landmark - the massive, century-old former May Co. flagship department store in the old movie theater district on Broadway - has hit the market as investors continue to bet on the comeback of downtown's historic center. The gritty blocks around it sport a growing number of upscale apartments, restaurants and boutiques in once run-down buildings, but most of them are small fry compared with the 1.1-million-square-foot Moby Dick that is the former May Co. store.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2013 | By Larry Harnisch, Los Angeles Times
Nick Souza doesn't remember developing the film of what he considers his most noteworthy front-page photo. He doesn't even recall printing the image. What he does remember is "standing on a giant ladder in the middle of Broadway" to photograph co-workers lined up in front of the old Herald Examiner. "I quickly snapped some photos of the editors, reporters and photographers that ended up being run six columns wide," he said, "with the headline: 'So Long, L.A.'" A generation has come of age since the death of Hearst's Los Angeles Herald Examiner on Nov. 2, 1989, a digital generation that has no memory of The Times' scrappy competitor.
NEWS
January 23, 1992
The Los Angeles Mesa branch of the Los Angeles Public Library will close Feb. 3 until reinforcement work is completed to bring it into compliance with earthquake safety codes. The branch, located at 2700 W. 52nd St., is a city cultural landmark built in 1928 with funds provided by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. A temporary location for the branch will be announced when arrangements are completed. Books that are checked out can be returned to any branch of the Los Angeles Public Library.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Susan King
  The Los Angeles County Museum of Art celebrates the 90th anniversary of the classic Harold Lloyd comedy "Safety Last!" on Thursday evening at the Leo S. Bing Theater.  One of the most popular of Lloyd's comedies, "Safety Last!" offers a fascinating look at Los Angeles in 1923 and features his iconic stunt hanging from the side of a downtown building. The presentation features a new digital restoration.  The comic's granddaughter, Suzanne Lloyd, will discuss the film and her granddad.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
What do you want from your library? The L.A. Public Library wants to know. In a brief -- very brief -- online survey, the library asks for your thoughts about the library and its future. The survey is available in English and Spanish . The Los Angeles Public Library was founded in 1872 and has 72 branches. It has an annual circulation of 18 million materials in 29 languages.  The first woman to head the city's library was Mary Foy , who served from 1880-84; she later became better known as a campaginer for women's rights.
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