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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cost of water in Los Angeles--and around the state--is expected to skyrocket in the coming decade as water agencies wrestle with the worsening problems of supply and quality, officials said Thursday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1992 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mario Ballin found something wrong with the new city recycling program for yard trimmings operating on weekends in Sun Valley. "There's a big thing wrong with this," said Ballin, 34, as he and helpers tossed a quarter ton of mustard grass, dry grass and chaparral off his large truck with pitchforks. "A program like this should have been started a few years ago," he said. "Other than that, it's great. And it's about time."
NEWS
June 25, 1995 | TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's been called a buyout, a payoff, a slush fund and a bribe. But whatever it's labeled, most residents of this eclectic area of horse ranches and blight say that taking $5 million from the city of Los Angeles in exchange for living within smelling distance of Lopez Canyon Landfill was like making a deal with the devil.
NEWS
December 14, 1994 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How good is the mail service in Los Angeles? To find out, The Times undertook an informal test of its own. The question: How long would it take letters to find their way within the basin, to other parts of California and the West, and to Washington, D.C.? The test also included a sample mailing from the Washington area to points in the Los Angeles basin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2001 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Board of Public Works on Monday gave the final go-ahead for a beautification project that is to act as a Gateway to Hollywood: a 30-foot-high glass tower and a large fountain on the median where Franklin and Wilcox avenues meet Cahuenga Boulevard. Supporters say the Gateway project, to cost an estimated $658,000 in private and public money, will help that portion of Hollywood continue its winning battle against prostitution and drug dealing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1995 | KAY HWANGBO
The Los Angeles City Council has postponed until November discussion of a proposal to build a $250-million water-filtration plant in Mission Canyon, a defunct landfill in Sepulveda Pass. The delay is the second in three months called to allow time for consideration of alternatives. Sepulveda Pass homeowner activists oppose the proposed plant, saying it would be an incompatible industrial use in the mountains and a waste of taxpayer money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1989
Santa Monica and Los Angeles have agreed to build an underground pipe to channel contaminated rainwater from one of the area's most notorious storm drains deep into the ocean. The pipe, which will run 600 feet into Santa Monica Bay, will be an extension of the Pico-Kenter storm drain, which empties onto the beach at the western end of Pico Boulevard. Pico-Kenter has long been considered one of the worst sources of pollution among the 64 storm drains that empty into the bay.
NEWS
December 16, 1995 | LORENZA MUNOZ and JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The mechanical failure that caused a fatal accident between a city trash truck and a school bus last week represents an endemic problem that could threaten not only Los Angeles' fleet, but similar trucks nationwide, according to an expert investigating the accident. Close inspection of the truck involved in the accident and others like it indicates severe problems in the design, construction and workmanship of Ontario-based manufacturer Amrep Corp., the source said in an interview Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU
Donning hard hats, Los Angeles city and law enforcement officials symbolically broke ground Monday for the new 911 emergency dispatch center being built at 23001 Roscoe Blvd. "Today we come one step closer in making Los Angeles the safest city in America," Mayor Richard Riordan said at the ceremony on the construction site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1991 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Fernando Valley fishermen will soon have a new place to look for a big catch. The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power has started construction of an underground pipeline that will eventually transport 70 million gallons of reclaimed water to fill up the now dry Balboa Lake in the Sepulveda Basin Recreation Area, said Jerry Gewe, engineer of water resources for the DWP. The park surrounding Balboa Lake has been open since August, 1990, but the 26-acre man-made lake has remained empty.
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