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Los Angeles Regional Drug And Poison Information Center

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1992
The Los Angeles Regional Poison Control Center, threatened by a severe funding shortfall last year, has been saved from closure. It has relocated to Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center to become part of the public hospital's existing drug information center for medical professionals. The combined service, called the Los Angeles Regional Drug and Poison Information Center, serves the public and professionals on its telephone hot lines.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1992
The Los Angeles Regional Poison Control Center, threatened by a severe funding shortfall last year, has been saved from closure. It has relocated to Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center to become part of the public hospital's existing drug information center for medical professionals. The combined service, called the Los Angeles Regional Drug and Poison Information Center, serves the public and professionals on its telephone hot lines.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1996 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities are investigating whether four people who became ill in a bar--two of them critically--had downed drinks spiked with a designer street drug, Huntington Beach police said Sunday. Three people, including a Covina woman, became unconscious and another complained of dizziness and an upset stomach Saturday night after having drinks at the Rhino Room, Lt. Dan Johnson said. Three of the victims knew each other.
NEWS
September 23, 1994 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is odorless, colorless and quietly lethal. It is carbon monoxide, the deadly byproduct of incomplete combustion and poor ventilation, and it is the leading cause of poisoning death in the United States. When the so-called killer gas took the life of former tennis star Vitas Gerulaitis, 40, in New York last week, public awareness of the threat got a tragic but timely boost. "It's a ubiquitous toxin, recognized since man first brought fire into the home for cooking," says Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Regional Poison Control Center, threatened by a severe funding shortfall last year, has been saved from closure by Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, where it has relocated to become part of the public hospital's existing drug information center for medical professionals. The combined service, called the Los Angeles Regional Drug and Poison Information Center, serves both the public and professionals on its telephone hot lines.
NEWS
August 8, 1995 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When 3-year-old Matthew Peters was bitten above his left ankle by a rattlesnake last week in his Glendale back yard, his family wasted no time calling for help. Within 45 minutes, the toddler was being treated in the emergency department at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles. Matthew's family serves as a textbook example of how to handle snakebite emergencies. Forget all that cut, suck and tie-a-tourniquet stuff you may have heard about. "The most important thing is to get to a hospital," says Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1996 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police are investigating whether four people who became ill in a bar--two of them critically--had downed drinks spiked with a designer street drug, Lt. Dan Johnson said Sunday. Three people became unconscious and another complained of dizziness and an upset stomach after having drinks Saturday night at the Rhino Room, police said. Three of the victims knew each other.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1995
Snakes become more active in warm weather and people who hike, mountain bike or live near canyons or open spaces are more likely to encounter them now. Types of snakes common to Orange County and tips on handling close encounters: Rattlesnakes The poisonous snakes found in Orange County are all rattlers. They are aptly named for the rattles on the end of their tails that consist of loosely attached scale segments that strike against one another when shaken.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1993 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thwarted in fund raising efforts to keep open its regional poison center, UCI Medical Center announced Thursday that starting in August all calls will be transferred to a center in Los Angeles County. The move comes as part of a state experiment to see if consolidating poison centers will save money, said Martin Honigs, spokesman for the Los Angeles County Regional Drug and Poison Information Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1994 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a lesson on Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men" last week, somebody in second-period English poisoned the teacher. And Susan C. Ennis said Sunday that she still cannot believe it. "I don't want to sound like a sap," said the 32-year-old teacher, recovering at a Palmdale hospital from Thursday's poisoning in a classroom at Littlerock High School. "But my kids love me."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1994 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a lesson on Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men" last week, somebody in second-period English poisoned the teacher. The teacher, Susan C. Ennis, said Sunday she still cannot believe it. "I don't want to sound like a sap," said the 32-year-old Littlerock High School teacher, recovering at a Palmdale hospital from Thursday's classroom poisoning. "But my kids love me."
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