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Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Board

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1999 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a long-running fight with the city of Long Beach over treatment of polluted storm water, members of the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board on Wednesday approved a far-reaching plan that could become a model for other cities in the county. The five board members unanimously approved the complex plan after a three-hour hearing in Pasadena.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
A state regulatory agency on Thursday gave the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 60 days to submit a plan for restoring 49 acres of wildlife habitat that it plowed under at two locations along the Los Angeles River without proper authorization. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board ordered the corps to mitigate the unauthorized dredge and fill operations at the Verdugo Wash in Glendale and Sepulveda Basin in the San Fernando Valley in a manner that will support the water quality, vegetation and wildlife that existed before they were graded.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1998 | DARYL KELLEY and CATHY MURILLO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With a rare criminal inquiry hanging over their heads, Thousand Oaks city officials said Wednesday that an act of God, not a violation of law, led to a massive sewage spill this month that closed 30 miles of beaches in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. "We haven't committed any crime," City Atty. Mark Sellers said. "We have had an unprecedented weather event that caused a torrent of rainwaters to break this [sewer] line. It's not a crime to be struck by an act of God."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
A state regulatory agency Wednesday said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers failed to obtain a required permit before it removed 43 acres of wildlife habitat in the Sepulveda Basin and filled in a pond used by migrating waterfowl. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board has directed the Army Corps to provide information by Feb. 11 about its decision to eliminate woodlands and potentially foul the Los Angeles River with sediment. Sepulveda Basin is an engineered flood control zone for the river.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
A state regulatory agency Wednesday said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers failed to obtain a required permit before it removed 43 acres of wildlife habitat in the Sepulveda Basin and filled in a pond used by migrating waterfowl. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board has directed the Army Corps to provide information by Feb. 11 about its decision to eliminate woodlands and potentially foul the Los Angeles River with sediment. Sepulveda Basin is an engineered flood control zone for the river.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
A state regulatory agency on Thursday gave the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 60 days to submit a plan for restoring 49 acres of wildlife habitat that it plowed under at two locations along the Los Angeles River without proper authorization. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board ordered the corps to mitigate the unauthorized dredge and fill operations at the Verdugo Wash in Glendale and Sepulveda Basin in the San Fernando Valley in a manner that will support the water quality, vegetation and wildlife that existed before they were graded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1990
Changes negotiated privately with state officials could allow the operator of an Azusa landfill to reclaim the $20.5 million it pledged to clean up San Gabriel Valley water pollution, officials of three water agencies charged Wednesday. The officials are angery about an agreement made final last month by the State Water Resources Control Board, the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Board and Browning-Ferris Industries, whose subsidiary, the Azusa Land Reclamation Co., owns the Azusa landfill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1988
The inspection and cleanup of contamination that could endanger drinking water in the San Fernando and San Gabriel valleys should be accelerated, the chief of the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board's toxic section told the board Monday. The official, Hank H. Yacoub, said that at the current pace it will take until 2000 to find and eliminate thousands of leaks from fuel tanks and storage facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2002
A metal recycler must halt all discharges of a soupy waste that has over 30 years created a 40-foot slag heap on its beachfront property. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board on Thursday gave Halaco Engineering Inc. nine months to convert to a system that would remove water from the slurry generated by its smelting plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
Dozens of San Fernando Valley residents on Wednesday challenged public assurances that their water quality won't be affected by an expansion of Sunshine Canyon Landfill into Granada Hills. "I don't believe that that water can be as clean as they're saying it is," said Fred Rennwald, 61. About 80 residents attended a public hearing held by the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board on the proposal by Browning Ferris Industries to expand landfill operations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1999 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a long-running fight with the city of Long Beach over treatment of polluted storm water, members of the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board on Wednesday approved a far-reaching plan that could become a model for other cities in the county. The five board members unanimously approved the complex plan after a three-hour hearing in Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1998 | DARYL KELLEY and CATHY MURILLO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With a rare criminal inquiry hanging over their heads, Thousand Oaks city officials said Wednesday that an act of God, not a violation of law, led to a massive sewage spill this month that closed 30 miles of beaches in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. "We haven't committed any crime," City Atty. Mark Sellers said. "We have had an unprecedented weather event that caused a torrent of rainwaters to break this [sewer] line. It's not a crime to be struck by an act of God."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2001
State officials on Wednesday took the first step to halt the flow of trash into Ballona Creek, the largest source of pollution for Santa Monica Bay. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board gave city, county and California Department of Transportation officials 14 years to eliminate all trash now being swept from storm drains into the creek, phasing in reductions of about 10% a year. The deadlines are nearly identical to those imposed on the Los Angeles River in January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Boeing Co. has paid more than $471,000 to settle a state enforcement action against the aerospace giant for scores of water quality violations at the company's Santa Susana Field Laboratory near Simi Valley. Boeing was accused of allowing excessive levels of lead, mercury and other toxins to flow from the nuclear and rocket-engine test site into surrounding canyons as well as the Arroyo Simi and Bell Creek, a tributary of the Los Angeles River.
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