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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1994 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Dunn, a Long Beach nurse-practitioner, turned a portion of the $10,000 "shopping spree" prize she won at a department store into gift certificates for 50 families who were victims of the Northridge earthquake. Students at a Pennsylvania middle school raised $440 by selling peanut butter Easter eggs and donated it to a single mother with seven children in Canoga Park whose apartment was destroyed in the Jan. 17 temblor.
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NEWS
November 6, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive earthquake that rocked houses and businesses off their foundations Jan. 17 also shook the tenuous and sometimes volatile relationship between San Fernando Valley and south Los Angeles lawmakers. The tension has been evident during a recent series of City Hall squabbles over how to divide limited recovery dollars between quake-ravaged Valley communities and south Los Angeles neighborhoods still reeling from the impact of the 1992 riots.
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NEWS
May 14, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush announced Wednesday that the government will provide $600 million in low-interest loans for South Los Angeles and other areas devastated in the violent aftermath of the Rodney King verdicts. The new loan funds, to be made available through the Federal Home Loan Bank Board system, are in addition to $600 million in emergency funds already designated for the stricken city and a host of other urban aid programs being considered by Congress and the President.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN
The Federal Emergency Management Agency announced Tuesday that it has approved $2.8 million to clean up and secure 12 clusters of vacant, crime-plagued apartments and condominiums known as "ghost towns" in the San Fernando Valley, Hollywood and Mid-City areas. The funding, which was promised in June by FEMA Director James Lee Witt, would pay to clear away debris, board up openings, erect fences and hire private security guards at about 150 vacant, quake-damaged buildings.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Seven of Southern California's leading concert promotion firms Tuesday were planning a series of benefit performances to raise upward of $1 million for victims of last week's rioting. "This is an extremely unusual occurrence," said Missy Worth, vice president of talent and acquisition for MCA Concerts, which books shows at the Universal Amphitheatre. "Concert promotion in this town is typically a very cutthroat, competitive business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN
The Federal Emergency Management Agency announced Tuesday that it has approved $2.8 million to clean up and secure 12 clusters of vacant, crime-plagued apartments and condominiums known as "ghost towns" in the San Fernando Valley, Hollywood and Mid-City areas. The funding, which was promised in June by FEMA Director James Lee Witt, would pay to clear away debris, board up openings, erect fences and hire private security guards at about 150 vacant, quake-damaged buildings.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | PAUL FELDMAN and SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The proposed congressional amendment barring illegal immigrants from receiving non-emergency earthquake aid may have more impact on election-year politics than any practical effect on providing assistance to disaster victims, federal officials and immigration activists say. For one thing, the bulk of President Clinton's $8.6-billion aid package would go toward fixing freeways, schools and other public facilities rather than assisting individuals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1992
Disaster assistance centers that were set to close last week will remain open until July 15 to give residents affected by the riots more time to apply for federal aid programs. In addition, application deadlines for most aid programs have been extended to that date. "We want to make sure that everyone who is eligible for assistance is able to apply," said Federal Emergency Management Agency spokeswoman Ruth Austen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1992
Non-English speaking riot victims will be able to receive help in applying for loans under a program sponsored by the Small Business Administration and AT&T. The telecommunications company has agreed to donate the use of its interpreters and instant conference call capabilities to assist SBA personnel and loan applicants in securing information.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES
When the Kirov Ballet of St. Petersburg dances at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles May 26-31, $5 from the sale of every ticket will be donated to organizations in the city that are helping to rebuild areas devastated during the recent civil unrest there. However, when the troupe performs at the Orange County Performing Arts Center May 19-24, there will not be any proceeds to benefit those hurt by the riots, center President Thomas A. Kendrick confirmed Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1994 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Housing Secretary Henry G. Cisneros and Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan toured San Fernando Valley "ghost towns" Thursday, drawing attention to a new strategy to jump-start repair work in apartment neighborhoods with heavy earthquake damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1994 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Housing Secretary Henry Cisneros and Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan toured San Fernando Valley "ghost towns" Thursday, drawing attention to a new strategy to jump-start repair work in apartment neighborhoods with heavy quake damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1994
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday waived the payment of business and payroll taxes for shops and companies that were forced by earthquake damage to close for at least 60 days. Without comment, the council unanimously approved an ordinance providing employers with relief from 1994 business and payroll expense taxes, which are based on 1993 gross receipts. Since the Jan. 17 Northridge earthquake, the council has been granting various forms of relief to victims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1994 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Dunn, a Long Beach nurse-practitioner, turned a portion of the $10,000 "shopping spree" prize she won at a department store into gift certificates for 50 families who were victims of the Northridge earthquake. Students at a Pennsylvania middle school raised $440 by selling peanut butter Easter eggs and donated it to a single mother with seven children in Canoga Park whose apartment was destroyed in the Jan. 17 temblor.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | PAUL FELDMAN and SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The proposed congressional amendment barring illegal immigrants from receiving non-emergency earthquake aid may have more impact on election-year politics than any practical effect on providing assistance to disaster victims, federal officials and immigration activists say. For one thing, the bulk of President Clinton's $8.6-billion aid package would go toward fixing freeways, schools and other public facilities rather than assisting individuals.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caught between the pleas of earthquake victims for billions of dollars in federal aid and the demands of party ideology to pay for it with budget cuts, California House Republicans Thursday found themselves in a classic political dilemma. How do you remain faithful to the tenets of fiscal conservatism when the devastation is in your home state? How about in your back yard? "I'm not worried about explaining it," said Rep. Howard P.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caught between the pleas of earthquake victims for billions of dollars in federal aid and the demands of party ideology to pay for it with budget cuts, California House Republicans Thursday found themselves in a classic political dilemma. How do you remain faithful to the tenets of fiscal conservatism when the devastation is in your home state? How about in your back yard? "I'm not worried about explaining it," said Rep. Howard P.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | ALAN C. MILLER and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The House on Thursday swiftly sent the $8.6-billion California earthquake relief bill to the Senate, paving the way for final congressional approval by the end of next week. "It was really a magnificent victory and it will help speed this through the Senate," said Rep. Don Edwards (D-San Jose), dean of the California delegation. The bill passed on a 337-74 vote.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | ALAN C. MILLER and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The House on Thursday swiftly sent the $8.6-billion California earthquake relief bill to the Senate, paving the way for final congressional approval by the end of next week. "It was really a magnificent victory and it will help speed this through the Senate," said Rep. Don Edwards (D-San Jose), dean of the California delegation. The bill passed on a 337-74 vote.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over opposition from the Wilson Administration, a legislative committee Thursday approved fast-track legislation authored by Assembly Speaker Willie Brown that would impose a $1.5-billion sales tax increase to help repair damage from the Northridge earthquake. Similar to a law enacted after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, the new bill would add a tax of one-quarter of a cent on the dollar starting March 1. It would expire April 30, 1996.
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