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June 22, 1987
The Citizens Coalition on Human Rights, a public-interest group affiliated with the Church of Scientology, set up a picket line outside Griffith Park, protesting alleged use of behavior-altering drugs in Los Angeles schools. About 300 adults and children, some wearing T-shirts emblazoned with such sentiments as "Psychiatry Kills," carried signs attacking the psychiatric profession and alleging its members are trying to profit from unnecessary drug treatment of the young.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Howard Blume
New York City Chancellor Carmen Farina oversees more than a million students, 1,700 schools and a budget the size of many states. Her pay: $412,193. Los Angeles Unified Supt. John Deasy has half a million students, 1,000-plus schools, a $7-billion budget - and made $393,106 last year. Supt. Jose Fernandez's South Bay school district has just 6,600 students, five high schools and a $70-million budget. His earnings: $674,559 last year. "I don't know of anybody, in any major city, who makes anything close to that, even with extra bonuses or compensation," said Michael Casserly, executive director of the Council of the Great City Schools, based in Washington.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2001
Rand Corp. will conduct an 18-month evaluation of arts curricula in the Los Angeles schools. The Santa Monica-based nonprofit research institution will examine whether arts programs have been implemented, whether they make a difference in student achievement and whether they can be replicated on a large scale. Educators and policymakers are increasingly concerned about the erosion of arts programs in the nation's schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Los Angeles schools Supt. John Deasy, who has led the nation's second-largest school system since 2011, has told some top district officials that he could be leaving in coming months. Deasy declined to discuss his intentions Thursday evening, saying that he has not submitted a letter of resignation and that he would have more to say after his job evaluation Tuesday. But the office of Board of Education President Richard Vladovic said Vladovic was among those who'd spoken with the superintendent Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2001 | From Times staff reports
Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan launched his L.A. Literacy Corps during a radio broadcast Wednesday, calling on businesses to chip in both money and employee time for schools. Under the program, employees would read to students and coach them in reading. Four companies answered the challenge during the broadcast on KFWB-AM (980) radio, beginning with the radio station.
NEWS
July 14, 1998 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Los Angeles school students scored substantially below the national average in reading at every grade level, plunging to the bottom fourth in third grade, a Times analysis of state standardized test scores shows. Reading scores improved through the eighth grade, then dipped again into the bottom quarter in the ninth and 10th grades. While the average was low, figures released Monday by the Los Angeles Unified School District showed tremendous variation between schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1991 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mike Roos, the state Assembly Speaker Pro Tem who is stepping down March 1 to head a nonprofit group aimed at improving Los Angeles schools, faces a daunting task that could boost or break his career, according to business leaders and school district insiders who tapped him for the job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1988 | LARRY GORDON, Times Education Writer
Union lawyers may advise some Los Angeles teachers not to cooperate with the planned investigation of cheating on state achievement tests and student writing competency exams, according to a union official who complained that the probe is designed to cover up administrators' wrongdoing. "Our job is to protect the legal rights of our members," Marvin Katz, vice president of United Teachers-Los Angeles, American Federation of Teachers, said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to quell a furor over traditional versus progressive math instruction, Los Angeles schools Supt. Ruben Zacarias on Thursday rescinded an order by his top staffers to eliminate textbooks used in a federally funded enrichment program for poor minority students. In an interview, Zacarias said he was unaware of the July 23 order from the office of Deputy Supt.
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assembly Speaker Pro Tempore Mike Roos (D-Los Angeles) said Tuesday that he is considering quitting the Legislature to accept a high-salaried job heading a group seeking to improve the quality of Los Angeles schools. "I am considering it," Roos told The Times, confirming a rumor that has been circulating in the state Capitol for the past several weeks.
OPINION
October 23, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Segregating young children for whom English is a new language according to their fluency levels produces the best academic results, according to most research. So the Los Angeles Unified School District has little choice in the matter. As a result of a settlement with the U.S. Department of Education, which had accused the district of doing poorly by its English learners, the district was required to submit an evidence-based plan for improvement, and that plan calls for sorting the students by English skills.
OPINION
August 28, 2013
When voters passed Proposition 39 in 2000, they surely had no idea of the headaches it would cause Los Angeles schools. Most Californians probably never even noticed the wording about providing space for charter schools, and if they did, they had little idea of what a charter school was. The chief purpose of the measure was to allow school bonds to pass with 55% of the vote rather than the two-thirds supermajority required up to that point. Schools were falling apart and classrooms were so tightly packed that many campuses operated on year-round, multitrack schedules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos
The Huntington Library this week debuted an unusual collection: The work was created on the streets of East Los Angeles and the artists have yet to graduate from high school. More than 100 photographic portraits of students from Esteban E. Torres High School will be featured on a 1,000-foot fence covering the construction of the Huntington Library's Education and Visitor Center. Three of the five academies on the Torres campus partnered with the Huntington as part of its "2nd Campus" program, which aims to use the institution's collections as a way for schools to increase awareness of the range of career paths in the arts, humanities and botanical science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2013 | By James Rainey
Eric Garcetti and Wendy Greuel ventured into school district politics Tuesday, lending support to noncontroversial actions and mostly taking a respite from their recent sniping in the Los Angeles mayoral contest. A week before voters go to the polls, Greuel addressed the Los Angeles Unified School District board in favor of a program that provides students breakfast in classrooms and for discontinuing a policy of suspending students for "willful defiance. " The school board, as expected, approved both items.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
The subject of the morning class was criminal investigation, and there was no hesitation on the part of the 17-year-old when he was asked to stand and explain aggravated assault. The boy related the story of how his father, estranged from his mother, had shown up at the house and begun pushing her around. He told of how police had come and explained to his mother the steps she would need to take to obtain a restraining order. School was in session at the Los Angeles Police Department's Ahmanson Training Center in Westchester as high school seniors dressed in brown khaki trousers and blue uniform shirts kicked off another day in an unusual law enforcement training program called the Police Orientation Preparation Program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
Half a dozen arms reached for the sky, some gently grazing a basketball as it escaped the court and thudded out of bounds at the Edward Roybal Learning Center. Despite their best efforts at trying to keep the ball in the game, both teams showed no hint of defeat, even after one was declared the winner. The Los Angeles Unified School District/Special Olympics Unified Basketball League's Eastern finals were underway, and the mood was decidedly different from that of other sports finals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1998 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an impassioned call to arms: to have Los Angeles schoolchildren, many of whom are just learning English, "Reading by Nine." After all, educators and officials at a Saturday reading conference said, it is the very future of the city that is at stake in the campaign to implement an effective reading strategy for public school students in Los Angeles. "This is life or death," said Marian Joseph, a member of the State Board of Education.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER. Times staff writer Paul Jacobs contributed to this story
A key state Assembly committee on Wednesday overwhelmingly rejected a sweeping proposal to dismantle the Los Angeles Unified School District--an action likely to prompt an initiative drive to put the issue on the ballot. After a contentious three-hour hearing and several days of intense behind-the-scenes lobbying, the bill by Sen. President Pro Tem David A. Roberti (D-Van Nuys) drew support from only four Republicans and was opposed by six Democrats, including four from Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2012 | Sandy Banks
I was prepared for the dog-and-pony show - the choreographed "reveal" of a school makeover that's been in the works for years. I didn't expect much beyond a grown-up version of show-and-tell. But I came anyway because I have a soft spot for Jordan High in Watts. I've spent a decade tracking the school's efforts to improve; watched reformers arrive with big plans and leave with broken dreams. The school's problems, they'd say, are too deep and expensive to fix; too intertwined with a neighborhood that will always be warped by dysfunction and poverty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
Students from Western Avenue Elementary's special education classes sat in the shade and counted rings on "tree cookies" taken from redwoods on a recent field trip. "This is where learning comes alive and is more meaningful," said teacher Mysie Dela Pena about the Christensen Math Science and Technology Center in San Pedro. "We talk about a lot of these elements in the classroom, but this is where they get the experience firsthand. " The interactive life science classroom is a beleaguered survivor of the Los Angeles Unified School District's budget cuts.
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