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Los Angeles Schools Overcrowding

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2000 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Los Angeles schools chief Roy Romer on Thursday said his top priorities will include shrinking the district bureaucracy, relieving overcrowding and calming the clamor for breaking up the district. "There's no issue that has caused me more concern than building more schools," Romer said at a Town Hall Los Angeles luncheon. "I don't yet see a path to get us out of that thicket." "I just want to say to you that I'm very excited to take this on," the former Colorado governor said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city's largest school secession plan would leave at least 8,000 students who are bused into the San Fernando Valley with no place to go unless schools in the Westside and Harbor areas converted to year-round schedules, a top Los Angeles school administrator said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN
The San Fernando Valley's school secession plan would leave at least 8,000 Los Angeles students with no place to go unless schools on the Westside and Harbor areas convert to year-round schedules, a top Los Angeles school administrator said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2000 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Even if every Los Angeles high school converts to a year-round schedule and the district completes nearly $2 billion in new construction, there still won't be enough seats for every high school student, school officials are warning. In the direst assessment yet of the district's facilities crisis, a report to be delivered to the Board of Education on Tuesday projects a shortfall of 2,000 to 5,000 seats in a few years even under the most optimistic scenario.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of student and parent protests, one of the preeminent high schools in the city--and the nation--will move to a year-round calendar in July, Los Angeles Unified interim Supt. Ramon Cortines announced Friday. In a letter to students, parents and teachers at North Hollywood High School, Cortines said he had no alternative but to force a switch at the campus, which has 3,500 students crammed into its classrooms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2000 | By DOUG SMITH,
The Los Angeles Dodgers told school officials Friday that a proposal to build a high school on a portion of the team's stadium parking lot in Elysian Park would be impractical. "The district's suggestion to build a 2,000-person high school . . . is fraught with extraordinary hurdles," Dodger President and Chief Operating Officer Bob Graziano said in a letter to the Los Angeles Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2000 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Los Angeles school officials have identified enough available land in the downtown area to establish five new campuses for 7,000 students--including those at the aging and overcrowded Belmont High School, they said Thursday. The sites would accommodate "smaller, better-equipped" high schools that could be completed within four years and paid for with construction bond money, said Howard Miller, the chief operating officer of the Los Angeles Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2000 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month after the Los Angeles Board of Education abandoned a much-needed school construction project for South Gate, the district's chief operating officer unveiled plans Wednesday for a new middle school and high school to ease classroom overcrowding in the city. Howard Miller's plans, drafted by a Los Angeles real estate consultant, also call for the construction of three primary centers and a permanent location for an elementary school that has been operating in a city park for 12 years.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the need to build classrooms grows in one of the nation's most densely populated and ethnically diverse communities, the Los Angeles Unified School District is considering a traumatic solution: evicting hundreds of families from their homes to create space for schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN and SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leadership changes, rising enrollment and campus construction projects dominated this year's education agenda in the San Fernando Valley's public schools. Voters elected a reform-minded school board in April with hopes of solving some of the Los Angeles Unified School District's mounting problems, such as overcrowding and the need to find uncontaminated land for new schools.
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