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Los Angeles Sewers

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January 9, 2001 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and state officials filed suit Monday against Los Angeles, demanding that the city stop its frequent sewage spills, which are occurring at a rate of almost two per day. "The high number of spills we've seen in the last few years is a serious public health problem," said Alexis Strauss, director of the EPA's regional water division. Los Angeles recently spent $1.6 billion to upgrade its Hyperion sewage treatment plant to meet environmental standards.
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NEWS
January 9, 2001 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and state officials filed suit Monday against Los Angeles, demanding that the city stop its frequent sewage spills, which are occurring at a rate of almost two per day. "The high number of spills we've seen in the last few years is a serious public health problem," said Alexis Strauss, director of the EPA's regional water division. Los Angeles recently spent $1.6 billion to upgrade its Hyperion sewage treatment plant to meet environmental standards.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1988
Arrowhead Industrial Water has offered to pay a $1-million bond to remain connected to Los Angeles sewers temporarily, and the city Board of Public Works has accepted the offer. The city had revoked Arrowhead's permit to dump in the sewers after charging the firm with repeated discharges of caustic wastes and acids. It is illegal to dump hazardous materials in the sewers, which eventually leave their waste in Santa Monica Bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1991
A London-based company was ordered Monday to pay nearly $200,000 after pleading no contest to charges that its Van Nuys electronics plant illegally dumped toxic wastes into the city's sewer system, the Los Angeles city attorney's office said. The judgment against ICI Americas includes $165,000 in court-ordered contributions to nonprofit environmental groups--the largest amount ever imposed on a company accused of illegal dumping into Los Angeles sewers, said City Atty. James K. Hahn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1987 | MICHAEL D. HARRIS, United Press International
Prosecutors consider All Valley Plating Co. one of the worst polluters they have ever encountered, allegedly dumping into Los Angeles sewers toxic materials that can produce the same poison gas used for executions. "Not only does this type of dumping pose a menace to sewer workers and the general public, but the cumulative effect can be devastating to the sewer system and our ground water supply," City Atty. James Hahn said. "These wastes literally eat away at the sewer system itself."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan and Ben Welsh
Since the day he took office in July, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has pledged heightened accountability at City Hall. For better or worse, facts began tumbling forth in the new " performance" section of the mayor's website Tuesday, Garcetti's 100th day in office. Los Angeles sewers overflowed 125 times last year, up from 116 the year before. Police reported more than 104,000 serious property and violent crimes last year, a drop from nearly 144,000 in 2005. And a little more than 5.1 million shipping containers full of goods flowed through Los Angeles Harbor, a drop from 5.4 million the year before.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
It has taken 12 years and more than $6 million worth of studies. But city engineers finally got the definitive word this week on why Los Angeles sewers overflow during rainstorms, polluting the beaches of Santa Monica Bay. The sewer pipes are not big enough. In dry weather, the 6,500 miles of sewers beneath the streets and lawns of Los Angeles work well enough, although they are filling up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Last December, Mayor Tom Bradley made headlines when he "ordered" a temporary ban on hosing of driveways and other wasteful uses of water to protect the outdated Los Angeles sewers from overflowing. In the three months since then, new construction has nudged the city's sewer system even closer to collapse, and still no water conservation controls have been imposed on Los Angeles residents.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Even as a light rain fell on the city, mandatory water conservation was tentatively imposed Tuesday on all Los Angeles residents and businesses for the first time since 1978 because of sewer troubles and the lack of winter snowpack in the High Sierra. The new water-conserving measures--ordered separately Tuesday by the City Council and the Board of Water and Power Commissioners--both require a final legislative action.
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