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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1990
As a member of the Los Angeles Student Coalition, I completely agree with Byron Dillon's sentiments that the dire problems of our own country, such as drugs, AIDS, racism and homelessness, must be dealt with immediately. But his criticism of our organization is unfair for precisely the reasons he cites (letter, Jan. 2). It is very true that compared to a sit-in at the South African Consulate, working for the homeless is unglamorous and yields little publicity. This is exactly why people such as Dillon have never heard about our efforts to help Los Angeles' homeless, such as our clothing drive to raise emergency supplies for the men and women of Skid Row who lost what little they had when the homeless arts and cultural center Another Planet burned down last summer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1990 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many of the children of Los Angeles, these are times of guns in the classroom, of gangs, drugs and disillusionment. A time of too few heroes. That was why Harold Love was so excited Friday after seeing Nelson Mandela at City Hall. "You sort of felt like you were in medieval times, seeing a king," said Love, who at 15 was born too late to know Martin Luther King Jr., and other civil rights giants as anything other than history book figures. "In a way, he is: A king for his people."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1988
In response to "Teen Coalition Conducts Anti-Apartheid Protest in 2-Mile Walk," Metro, March 29: So, South African Vice Consul Chris Liebenberg finds it "surprising that kids of that age are so politically inspired." He calls us "innocent kids" who have been duped by our teachers. What a strange statement for a representative of the South African government to make! Obviously, his nation's rulers do not agree with his assessment of teen-agers' "innocence," since they routinely imprison, torture, and murder young blacks for the crime of wishing for equality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1990
As a member of the Los Angeles Student Coalition, I completely agree with Byron Dillon's sentiments that the dire problems of our own country, such as drugs, AIDS, racism and homelessness, must be dealt with immediately. But his criticism of our organization is unfair for precisely the reasons he cites (letter, Jan. 2). It is very true that compared to a sit-in at the South African Consulate, working for the homeless is unglamorous and yields little publicity. This is exactly why people such as Dillon have never heard about our efforts to help Los Angeles' homeless, such as our clothing drive to raise emergency supplies for the men and women of Skid Row who lost what little they had when the homeless arts and cultural center Another Planet burned down last summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
A planned weeklong sit-in at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills was cut short Tuesday when a federal official placed 25 of the student protesters under citizen's arrest for obstructing access to the facility. Twenty-four juveniles and one adult member of the Los Angeles Student Coalition were arrested shortly after noon by a member of the U.S. State Department, said Beverly Hills Police Lt. Robert P. Curtis. The protesters, who began their sit-in Monday morning, were booked at the police station for investigation of misdemeanor charges of obstructing a person's access to a public place, Curtis said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1989 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-three Los Angeles high school and junior high students spent part of the first day of winter vacation in jail Monday after they were arrested at an anti-apartheid protest at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills. Ranging in age from 14 to 17, the students turned out at 6:30 a.m., blocking the doors to the consulate, demanding its closure and calling for an end to South Africa's system of legal segregation and discrimination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
They started off the morning singing the unofficial anthem of black Africa, but by noon had switched to tunes by the Sex Pistols. One student was willing to get arrested--if she could be sprung from jail in time for swim practice. And others were resigned to interrupting their civil disobedience to complete homework assignments. So it went Monday at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills, where more than 40 junior high, senior high and college students staged a sit-in to protest that country's policy of apartheid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1990 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many of the children of Los Angeles, these are times of guns in the classroom, of gangs, drugs and disillusionment. A time of too few heroes. That was why Harold Love was so excited Friday after seeing Nelson Mandela at City Hall. "You sort of felt like you were in medieval times, seeing a king," said Love, who at 15 was born too late to know Martin Luther King Jr., and other civil rights giants as anything other than history book figures. "In a way, he is: A king for his people."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1991
More than 20 university and high school students rallied in front of the state office building in Los Angeles on Friday to urge Gov. Pete Wilson to increase funding for the Los Angeles Unified School District. Facing rising expenses and a drop in state funding, the school board has been forced to reduce its budget by $274 million this year, largely by cutting employees' salaries, increasing class size and slashing campus spending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1990
Police in riot gear arrested 11 people, including anti-police brutality activist Don Jackson, during a demonstration Saturday against apartheid and racism in front of the exclusive Los Angeles Country Club, authorities said. Jackson was arrested when he tried to talk to club managers about allegedly racist membership policies, Los Angeles Police Department Officer Nelson Anderson said. He was with 100 protesters representing the Los Angeles Student Coalition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1989 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-three Los Angeles high school and junior high students spent part of the first day of winter vacation in jail Monday after they were arrested at an anti-apartheid protest at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills. Ranging in age from 14 to 17, the students turned out at 6:30 a.m., blocking the doors to the consulate, demanding its closure and calling for an end to South Africa's system of legal segregation and discrimination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
A planned weeklong sit-in at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills was cut short Tuesday when a federal official placed 25 of the student protesters under citizen's arrest for obstructing access to the facility. Twenty-four juveniles and one adult member of the Los Angeles Student Coalition were arrested shortly after noon by a member of the U.S. State Department, said Beverly Hills Police Lt. Robert P. Curtis. The protesters, who began their sit-in Monday morning, were booked at the police station for investigation of misdemeanor charges of obstructing a person's access to a public place, Curtis said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
They started off the morning singing the unofficial anthem of black Africa, but by noon had switched to tunes by the Sex Pistols. One student was willing to get arrested--if she could be sprung from jail in time for swim practice. And others were resigned to interrupting their civil disobedience to complete homework assignments. So it went Monday at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills, where more than 40 junior high, senior high and college students staged a sit-in to protest that country's policy of apartheid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1988
In response to "Teen Coalition Conducts Anti-Apartheid Protest in 2-Mile Walk," Metro, March 29: So, South African Vice Consul Chris Liebenberg finds it "surprising that kids of that age are so politically inspired." He calls us "innocent kids" who have been duped by our teachers. What a strange statement for a representative of the South African government to make! Obviously, his nation's rulers do not agree with his assessment of teen-agers' "innocence," since they routinely imprison, torture, and murder young blacks for the crime of wishing for equality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR, Times Staff Writer
Thirty high school and junior high school students spent the second day of a sit-in Saturday at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills sealed off from the outside world. Beverly Hills Police and security guards prevented supporters and parents from entering the office building on La Cienega Boulevard's Restaurant Row where the students began their anti-apartheid protest Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1988 | ANN WIENER, Times Staff Writer
About 300 students chanting anti-apartheid slogans demonstrated in front of the South African Consulate on Monday and called on the government to stop "denying blacks in that country their basic human rights." The Los Angeles Student Coalition, a group with members from more than 30 junior and senior high schools, walked 2 miles from Pan American Park in West Los Angeles to the consulate in Beverly Hills. As they walked, the students, out of school on spring break, chanted "Free South Africa . .
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