Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles Suicide Prevention Center
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Suicide Prevention Center

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 9, 1997
Some common characteristics of youths who commit suicide: * More girls make attempts, but boys are four times more likely to kill themselves; they choose more lethal methods and are less likely to seek help for depression. * Although attempts are high among some minority groups, whites are twice as likely to kill themselves. * At least half of the youths who die have experienced bouts of depression. * About 42% of boys and 12% of girls who kill themselves have abused alcohol or other substances.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2009 | Thomas Curwen
Edwin S. Shneidman, a pioneer in the field of suicide prevention and a prolific thinker and writer who believed that life is enriched by contemplation of death and dying, has died. He was 91. He died Friday afternoon at his home in West Los Angeles, according to his son, Robert. He had been in poor health for the last few months. Shneidman, one of the founders of the Los Angeles Suicide Prevention Center, believed that two simple questions -- "Where do you hurt?" and "How may I help you?"
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1988 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
The financially struggling Los Angeles Suicide Prevention Center may get a new lease on life if plans for Family Service of Los Angeles to acquire its assets go through, according to officials at the two agencies. The boards of directors are negotiating to make the suicide center a division of Family Service, a move that could take place as early as July, Tony Lufrano, president of Family Service, said this week.
NEWS
March 9, 1997
Some common characteristics of youths who commit suicide: * More girls make attempts, but boys are four times more likely to kill themselves; they choose more lethal methods and are less likely to seek help for depression. * Although attempts are high among some minority groups, whites are twice as likely to kill themselves. * At least half of the youths who die have experienced bouts of depression. * About 42% of boys and 12% of girls who kill themselves have abused alcohol or other substances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1988 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Investigators with the Los Angeles County Mental Health Department have been ordered to conduct surprise inspections at the Los Angeles Suicide Prevention Center, which has been rocked by allegations of mismanagement and a walkout by half of its crisis-line counselors. Mental health officials hope to determine whether the 24-hour suicide prevention crisis line is functioning properly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1988 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
The way Dr. Robert E. Litman sees it, the Los Angeles Suicide Prevention Center's problems could be resolved if the board of directors stopped engaging in "self-destructive" behavior. The noted psychiatrist who co-founded the pioneering center about 30 years ago claims that "useless management jerks have (squandered) all of the agency's money" in recent years. "It has been one mistake after another," Litman said of the board members. "They are incompetent."
MAGAZINE
October 13, 1991 | TOM McNICHOL, San Francisco writer Tom McNichol's work has appeared in the Washington Post Magazine, Spy, In Health and on National Public Radio's "All Things Considered." and
"THIS IS MY FINAL LOG ON. . . ." The words flashed across several Silicon Valley computer screens around dinner time one Sunday last April. Messages left on computer bulletin boards can be pretty strange sometimes, but this one had an urgency that rang terribly true to nearly everyone who read it. The note was brief, saying only that the sender had a loaded rifle and was going to kill himself. The sender typed in his name--Richard Martinez--and then logged off.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2009 | Thomas Curwen
Edwin S. Shneidman, a pioneer in the field of suicide prevention and a prolific thinker and writer who believed that life is enriched by contemplation of death and dying, has died. He was 91. He died Friday afternoon at his home in West Los Angeles, according to his son, Robert. He had been in poor health for the last few months. Shneidman, one of the founders of the Los Angeles Suicide Prevention Center, believed that two simple questions -- "Where do you hurt?" and "How may I help you?"
NEWS
August 28, 1986
The Los Angeles Suicide Prevention Center, which sponsors drug detoxification and treatment centers in Venice, Los Angeles and Wilmington, has received a $92,000 grant from the state Office of AIDS, which is part of the Deparment of Health Services. The funds will be used to design and test a counseling program for former and current intravenous drug-users to help prevent the spread of AIDS.
BOOKS
November 17, 1991
I commend Tom McNichol for his informative article, "Choosing Death," (Oct. 13). However, he states that the Los Angeles Suicide Prevention Center was absorbed by the county's Family Service agency. This is incorrect. The center ceased to exist as a separate agency in 1988 when it became a program of Family Service of Los Angeles, a private, nonprofit agency that has a diversified funding base.
MAGAZINE
October 13, 1991 | TOM McNICHOL, San Francisco writer Tom McNichol's work has appeared in the Washington Post Magazine, Spy, In Health and on National Public Radio's "All Things Considered." and
"THIS IS MY FINAL LOG ON. . . ." The words flashed across several Silicon Valley computer screens around dinner time one Sunday last April. Messages left on computer bulletin boards can be pretty strange sometimes, but this one had an urgency that rang terribly true to nearly everyone who read it. The note was brief, saying only that the sender had a loaded rifle and was going to kill himself. The sender typed in his name--Richard Martinez--and then logged off.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1988 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
The financially struggling Los Angeles Suicide Prevention Center may get a new lease on life if plans for Family Service of Los Angeles to acquire its assets go through, according to officials at the two agencies. The boards of directors are negotiating to make the suicide center a division of Family Service, a move that could take place as early as July, Tony Lufrano, president of Family Service, said this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1988 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Investigators with the Los Angeles County Mental Health Department have been ordered to conduct surprise inspections at the Los Angeles Suicide Prevention Center, which has been rocked by allegations of mismanagement and a walkout by half of its crisis-line counselors. Mental health officials hope to determine whether the 24-hour suicide prevention crisis line is functioning properly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1988 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
The way Dr. Robert E. Litman sees it, the Los Angeles Suicide Prevention Center's problems could be resolved if the board of directors stopped engaging in "self-destructive" behavior. The noted psychiatrist who co-founded the pioneering center about 30 years ago claims that "useless management jerks have (squandered) all of the agency's money" in recent years. "It has been one mistake after another," Litman said of the board members. "They are incompetent."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1987
Pending the outcome of a public hearing next week, here are the planned cutbacks in Los Angeles County health services that officials say may be necessary as a result of Gov. George Deukmejian's state budget vetoes: County-USC Medical Center General Hospital/Women's Hospital/Outpatient Divisions: - Bed reduction: 141. - Monthly outpatient visit reduction: 11,792.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|