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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2011 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
This is what one of Los Angeles Unified's most ambitious reform efforts looks like: about 30 people gathered in a Gardena school auditorium, watching a video of a teacher trying to get her young students to understand a John Updike poem. The viewers furiously type their observations into laptop computers and discuss their impressions of the lesson the next day. They ask open-ended questions — "What are some possible explanations for the lack of understanding of the vocabulary?"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
The performance ratings of individual teachers in the Los Angeles Unified School District will be kept confidential until a legal battle over them is resolved, a judge decided Tuesday. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge James C. Chalfant ruled earlier this month that the ratings must be released to the Los Angeles Times because public interest in them outweighed any teacher privacy rights under the California Public Records Act. But L.A. Unified and United Teachers Los Angeles joined to ask Chalfant to delay the release until they could appeal the ruling.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe and Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The recent groundbreaking agreement over evaluations for educators in the Los Angeles school district is a major victory for the teachers union because it limits the use of a controversial - but increasingly widespread - measurement of teacher effectiveness. The tentative pact puts the nation's second-largest school system at odds with a national trend to gauge the effect of teachers on student achievement by using a value-added analysis. That method, known in Los Angeles Unified as Academic Growth Over Time, is opposed by many teacher unions as unreliable; but it is being used in Illinois, New York, Texas, Florida, Washington, D.C., and elsewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe and Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The recent groundbreaking agreement over evaluations for educators in the Los Angeles school district is a major victory for the teachers union because it limits the use of a controversial - but increasingly widespread - measurement of teacher effectiveness. The tentative pact puts the nation's second-largest school system at odds with a national trend to gauge the effect of teachers on student achievement by using a value-added analysis. That method, known in Los Angeles Unified as Academic Growth Over Time, is opposed by many teacher unions as unreliable; but it is being used in Illinois, New York, Texas, Florida, Washington, D.C., and elsewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Members of the Los  Angeles teachers union voted overwhelmingly to approve a temporary salary reduction in exchange for sparing thousands of jobs, the union announced Saturday. The vote, which took place Thursday and Friday, means that the Los Angeles Unified School District's swollen class sizes will not increase next year and that the vast majority of teachers, nurses, librarians and magnet school coordinators — who run popular special programs — are likely to keep their jobs.
OPINION
December 6, 1992
In response to "Hard Line by Teachers Puts Some Parents Off," Nov. 23: It is about time. All parents need to take a closer look at the self-serving, self-centered and tunnel-vision tactics and propoganda of the leadership of United Teachers-Los Angeles. One of the many mottoes of UTLA is "We teach the children." The question is, just what are they teaching the children? From my perspective, they are modeling a stance of being uncooperative and very militant when they do not get their way. They expect to be paid as committed professionals yet moan and groan when an after-school faculty meeting is called that might keep them on the school site until the late hour of 4 p.m. Contractually, after-school meetings are limited to three per month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles school district and the teachers union reached a tentative agreement Friday that would prevent thousands of layoffs in exchange for 10 furlough days, which would shorten the school year by a week. Under the accord, teachers would lose pay for five instructional days plus four holidays and one training day, equivalent to about a 5% salary cut. The deal must by ratified by teachers and approved by the L.A. Board of Education. The school board is scheduled to vote on the plan at a meeting Tuesday; union members are expected to vote at schools beginning Wednesday.
NEWS
February 6, 1985
Two Los Angeles Unified School District teachers were named Bravo Award winners Monday night at a dinner held in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion at the Music Center. Chosen from 67 nominees and 10 finalists from Los Angeles area schools, the winners were Lynn Hickey of Sepulveda Junior High, an arts specialist, and Ida Rodich, a sixth-grade teacher at Carthay Center Elementary School. Bronze sculptures were presented to the winners by Nancy Olson Livingston and Garry Marshall.
SPORTS
May 11, 1989
In the event of a teachers' strike, coaches who choose not to report to their regularly assigned duties will still be allowed to work with their teams and will be paid for their extracurricular work, said Gabe Cortina, associate superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District. Los Angeles teachers are scheduled to walk out Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1989
"We just sat there. Then we started talking. Then somebody started throwing papers and everybody was throwing papers at the subs and yelling. It was complete havoc. There were about 10 teachers for 600 kids. Then, everybody started ditching." --Eighth-grader Tom Guth, describing the atmosphere in the auditorium of Walter Reed Junior High in North Hollywood on the first day of the strike by Los Angeles teachers.
OPINION
November 5, 2012 | By Linda Darling-Hammond and Edward Haertel
It's becoming a familiar story: Great teachers get low scores from "value-added" teacher evaluation models. Newspapers across the country have published accounts of extraordinary teachers whose evaluations, based on their students' state test scores, seem completely out of sync with the reality of their practice. Los Angeles teachers have figured prominently in these reports. Researchers are not surprised by these stories, because dozens of studies have documented the serious flaws in these ratings, which are increasingly used to evaluate teachers' effectiveness.
NEWS
June 22, 2012 | By Ted Rall
Los Angeles teachers agreed to shortening the school year by 10 days to 175 days, and to accept a commensurate pay cut. This is the fourth year in the row that the school year has been shortened. Is it only a matter of time before this editorial cartoon becomes a reality? ALSO: A soda ban, L.A.-style Photo gallery: Ted Rall cartoons Marijuana dispensaries: Hands off, City Hall Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall . Follow Opinion L.A. on Twitter and Facebook .  
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Members of United Teachers Los Angeles have approved a one-year labor contract that would shorten the school year and reduce pay in exchange for the preservation of more than 4,000 jobs, the union announced Saturday. The vote tally was 58% in favor of the contract and 42% opposed. Roughly two-thirds of all union members cast ballots. UTLA represents nurses, librarians, counselors, psychologists and psychiatric social workers in addition to classroom instructors. The school board approved the one-year pact Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles school district and the teachers union reached a tentative agreement Friday that would prevent thousands of layoffs in exchange for 10 furlough days, which would shorten the school year by a week. Under the accord, teachers would lose pay for five instructional days plus four holidays and one training day, equivalent to about a 5% salary cut. The deal must by ratified by teachers and approved by the L.A. Board of Education. The school board is scheduled to vote on the plan at a meeting Tuesday; union members are expected to vote at schools beginning Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2012 | By Richard Winton, Sam Allen and Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
One of two teachers accused of abusing students at Miramonte Elementary School was charged Tuesday with three felony counts and fired by the Los Angeles Board of Education. Martin Bernard Springer, 49, was arrested Friday after two students at the school accused him of fondling them. But the charges filed Tuesday - three counts of committing lewd acts - involve a single girl. A law enforcement source with knowledge of the investigation said the second girl recanted her accusation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2012
Oct. 2010: A worker at a CVS pharmacy in the South Bay notices the images of children blindfolded, with tape over their mouth while processing film belonging to teacher Mark Berndt. He alerts Redondo Beach police. Dec. 2010: Redondo Beach police turn over investigation to Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department after concluding the photos were taken at Berndt's classroom in an unincorporated section of South L.A. Jan. 3 , 2011: Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department detective Marvin Jaramilla goes to Berndt's Miramonte Elementary School classroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2012 | By Scott Gold, Richard Winton and Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
In the fall of 2010, a drugstore photo technician was running a batch of 35-millimeter film when a disturbing image tumbled out of the machine — a child, blindfolded with a white cloth and gagged with clear packing tape. From that first photograph, detectives spent the next year following a trail that led them to a South Los Angeles elementary school. They say they found acts of staggering depravity. There were more photos, it turned out — 400 more, traced to an apartment in nearby Torrance, then to a bustling schoolhouse in South Los Angeles.
OPINION
January 22, 2012
A chance on charters Re "Whistle-blowers to open a charter," Jan. 18 Congratulations to the Los Angeles teachers who are opening their own charter school. They will have the professional autonomy to do the very best they can for their students without being micromanaged from above. They can manage the school themselves or select someone to be head teacher. They will be able to make key decisions about the budget as well as curriculum, instruction and staffing.
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