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SPORTS
November 20, 1998 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Miscellany UC Irvine's Chris Chung and Chris Ma advanced with second-round singles victories at the Southern California Intercollegiates tournament at the Los Angeles Tennis Club. Chung defeated Pepperdine's Sebastien Graeff, 6-4, 7-5, and Ma defeated UCLA's Duc Nguyen, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3.
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SPORTS
July 17, 2001 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A match ending under suspicious circumstances? Indifferent explanations? Strange days on the tennis circuit have not been limited to the modern era. In 1935, spectators at the Pacific Southwest championships were left dazed and confused at the Los Angeles Tennis Club when the players left the court after the third set and never returned. Nineteen-year-old Don Budge recovered from a first-set blowout and won the second and third sets against Roderick Menzel of Czechoslovakia in their final.
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SPORTS
July 13, 1991
Oh come on, Jim Murray. Perry Jones (July 9) didn't care a twit whether Pancho Gonzalez dropped out of school. He cared only that Gonzalez had a Spanish surname. It wasn't until the very end of his reign and after some heavy criticism of his policies that Jones let Arthur Ashe play on his royal courts. In those days at the Los Angeles Tennis Club, we would probably have never seen Michael Chang play tennis. Personally, I am happy that there are no Perry Joneses left and we have come to learn that white tennis clothes and white faces do not necessarily a tennis player make.
SPORTS
July 16, 2001 | Lisa Dillman
The first couple of years of the historic Pacific Southwest tennis tournament, in 1927 and 1928, merited only the bare bones of information in the tiny Spalding Tennis Annual, the winners and scores. By the start of the next decade, it became clear the event was something special. Bill Tilden won the first year, followed by Henri Cochet, John Doeg and Ellsworth Vines.
SPORTS
July 17, 2001 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A match ending under suspicious circumstances? Indifferent explanations? Strange days on the tennis circuit have not been limited to the modern era. In 1935, spectators at the Pacific Southwest championships were left dazed and confused at the Los Angeles Tennis Club when the players left the court after the third set and never returned. Nineteen-year-old Don Budge recovered from a first-set blowout and won the second and third sets against Roderick Menzel of Czechoslovakia in their final.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1991 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "ball girls" are in their 70s. The players are in their 80s. And the chair umpire, pushing 90, has been known to snooze during a match. But it's brutally serious business on center court of the Los Angeles Tennis Club as they near the finals of the women's 80-and-over hard court championship of the United States.
NEWS
December 29, 1999 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rich, relevant, and sometimes, reactionary snapshot history of Los Angeles tennis in the 1900s, from A to Z: * A: is for Tracy Austin, who appeared on the cover of World Tennis magazine at age 4. A child prodigy coached by Vic Braden and later Robert Lansdorp, Austin grew up in Rolling Hills and became the youngest female to win the U.S. Open at 16 years 9 months in 1979. Lansdorp promised to quit smoking if she won the Open.
SPORTS
July 16, 2001 | Lisa Dillman
The first couple of years of the historic Pacific Southwest tennis tournament, in 1927 and 1928, merited only the bare bones of information in the tiny Spalding Tennis Annual, the winners and scores. By the start of the next decade, it became clear the event was something special. Bill Tilden won the first year, followed by Henri Cochet, John Doeg and Ellsworth Vines.
SPORTS
May 10, 1989 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
On one side of the net was Ken Beer, 85, a retired airline pilot from Hillsborough, Calif. On the other side was Gabe Goldstein, 9, a third-grader from Warner Avenue school in Westwood. Of all the competition on center court at the Los Angeles Tennis Club--where so many stars have played, from Bill Tilden and Elly Vines to Budge, Kramer, Gonzales, Laver, Borg and McEnroe--there has rarely been a men's (boys'?) match like this. Both players were fresh from victories. Beer, the United States 85-and-over champion, had won one for octogenarians Sunday at La Jolla.
SPORTS
December 11, 1994 | LON EUBANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1930s and early 1940s were salad days for the Los Angeles Tennis Club on Clinton Street. Bing Crosby played there. So did Errol Flynn, Gilbert Roland and others from what was the movie industry. Some of the elite of Los Angeles business also gathered there when L.A. still was a gangling, growing city. Just about everyone who played good tennis in the city in those days found their way there, regulars and occasional visitors. If you really liked the game, it was the place to be.
NEWS
December 29, 1999 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rich, relevant, and sometimes, reactionary snapshot history of Los Angeles tennis in the 1900s, from A to Z: * A: is for Tracy Austin, who appeared on the cover of World Tennis magazine at age 4. A child prodigy coached by Vic Braden and later Robert Lansdorp, Austin grew up in Rolling Hills and became the youngest female to win the U.S. Open at 16 years 9 months in 1979. Lansdorp promised to quit smoking if she won the Open.
SPORTS
November 20, 1998 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Miscellany UC Irvine's Chris Chung and Chris Ma advanced with second-round singles victories at the Southern California Intercollegiates tournament at the Los Angeles Tennis Club. Chung defeated Pepperdine's Sebastien Graeff, 6-4, 7-5, and Ma defeated UCLA's Duc Nguyen, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3.
SPORTS
December 11, 1994 | LON EUBANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1930s and early 1940s were salad days for the Los Angeles Tennis Club on Clinton Street. Bing Crosby played there. So did Errol Flynn, Gilbert Roland and others from what was the movie industry. Some of the elite of Los Angeles business also gathered there when L.A. still was a gangling, growing city. Just about everyone who played good tennis in the city in those days found their way there, regulars and occasional visitors. If you really liked the game, it was the place to be.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1991 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "ball girls" are in their 70s. The players are in their 80s. And the chair umpire, pushing 90, has been known to snooze during a match. But it's brutally serious business on center court of the Los Angeles Tennis Club as they near the finals of the women's 80-and-over hard court championship of the United States.
SPORTS
July 13, 1991
Oh come on, Jim Murray. Perry Jones (July 9) didn't care a twit whether Pancho Gonzalez dropped out of school. He cared only that Gonzalez had a Spanish surname. It wasn't until the very end of his reign and after some heavy criticism of his policies that Jones let Arthur Ashe play on his royal courts. In those days at the Los Angeles Tennis Club, we would probably have never seen Michael Chang play tennis. Personally, I am happy that there are no Perry Joneses left and we have come to learn that white tennis clothes and white faces do not necessarily a tennis player make.
SPORTS
May 10, 1989 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
On one side of the net was Ken Beer, 85, a retired airline pilot from Hillsborough, Calif. On the other side was Gabe Goldstein, 9, a third-grader from Warner Avenue school in Westwood. Of all the competition on center court at the Los Angeles Tennis Club--where so many stars have played, from Bill Tilden and Elly Vines to Budge, Kramer, Gonzales, Laver, Borg and McEnroe--there has rarely been a men's (boys'?) match like this. Both players were fresh from victories. Beer, the United States 85-and-over champion, had won one for octogenarians Sunday at La Jolla.
SPORTS
May 23, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Geoff Abrams, 14, of Newport Beach and Dodo Cheney, 75, of Santa Monica, winner of more than 200 titles, headline the "Youth vs. Experience" tennis competition Monday at the Los Angeles tennis club. The tournament features teams of youths, grouped by age, against older players.
SPORTS
May 19, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
UCLA's Eric Taino defeated Duke's Doug Root, 6-2, 6-2, in No. 1 singles Sunday as the top-seeded Bruins posted a 4-2 victory in the quarterfinals of the NCAA men's tennis team championship at the Los Angeles Tennis Club. The Stanford women's tennis team avenged its only loss of the season with a 5-1 victory over top-seeded Florida to win the NCAA women's tennis team title at Stanford.
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