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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR and DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
City officials scrambled Friday to salvage what they could from their $27-million investment in the Los Angeles Theatre Center after trustees of the insolvent company voted to cease operations. Officials expressed frustration at LATC's demise, but also determination to prevent the high-tech, four-stage facility on the fringe of Skid Row from becoming a white elephant. "We are committed to keeping the lights burning at the theater center facility," said Adolfo V.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR and DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
City officials scrambled Friday to salvage what they could from their $27-million investment in the Los Angeles Theatre Center after trustees of the insolvent company voted to cease operations. Officials expressed frustration at LATC's demise, but also determination to prevent the high-tech, four-stage facility on the fringe of Skid Row from becoming a white elephant. "We are committed to keeping the lights burning at the theater center facility," said Adolfo V.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
LATC Tenants: A list of arts organizations that might operate the former Spring Street home of the Los Angeles Theatre Center company was put before a City Council committee meeting Monday afternoon. Five groups in the proposed cooperative--Mark Taper Forum/Latino Theatre Lab, Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, Bethune Dance Company, Airshow (a sign-language company) and Music Center Opera (for educational programs)--plan to use the facility's midsize stages.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES and * "The Silken Ladder" will be repeated Wednesday and Saturday at 8 p.m. at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre, 2580 Cahuenga Blvd. $20 and $25. Information: (213) 466-1767.
Rossini wrote "La Scala de Seta" ("The Silken Ladder"), a sparkling farce, when he was 20. It was the third of five comic works he composed for Antonio Cera and the San Moise theater in Venice. Audiences considered the music inferior to "L'Inganno Felice," its immediate predecessor, however, and the opera virtually disappeared from the repertory, although the overture survived as an effervescent concert piece.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2006 | Lynne Heffley
WHEN people refer to Dakin Matthews as one of theater's most versatile figures, they aren't exaggerating. He's an actor, director, playwright, classics scholar and translator of 17th century Italian comedy. He also co-founded Los Angeles' Antaeus Theatre Company and the Andak Stage Company. And if that isn't enough, in his spare time he appears in TV and in film.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1988 | LAURIE OCHOA, Times Staff Writer
Until 10 years ago, the only opera that interested Lin White was soap opera. She played a troublesome vixen--long before Joan Collins made viciousness trendy--on the soap, "The Brighter Day," and then mellowed into more sympathetic roles on "The Guiding Light" and "As the World Turns." But now, the one-time teacher to "Dennis the Menace" (a role she played during the TV series' last year) is teaching real-life students the finer skills of acting in opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2005
HERE are some notable -- and forgettable -- productions cited by Times reviewers and writers Philip Brandes, F. Kathleen Foley, Lynne Heffley, Daryl H. Miller, David C. Nichols, Don Shirley and James C. Taylor: The true-life controversy at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia provided ripe material for Thomas Gibbons' "Permanent Collection." This glimpse into the internal struggles at an art institution took on issues of race and cultural ownership.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1995 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even at age 12, Mozart could compose pleas for forgiveness that would make angels weep. Not that these are the only beautiful or arresting passages in his rarely heard opera "La Finta Semplice," written at that tender age and sung in English as "Marriage by Stealth" on Saturday at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre by David Anglin's Los Angeles Music Theatre Company. The pleas occur when Giacinta and Ninetta implore the obdurate Cassandro to let them marry the men they love.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1993
Curt L. Allen, opera singer and professor of music at Cal State Northridge, has died at a Northridge hospital. He was 57. A North Hills resident for six years, Allen died Tuesday of pneumonia, said Joseph Givens, Allen's longtime companion. Born in Ponca City, Okla., Allen received his bachelor's degree in music from Boston's New England Conservatory of Music in 1957 and his master's degree in music from the University of Oklahoma in 1967.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2003 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Basil Langton, a British-born actor and director whose 50-year career ranged from leading roles in Shakespeare plays on the London stage to small parts in television, including "Star Trek: Voyager" in 1994, died May 29 at St. John's Hospital Health Center in Santa Monica after a brief illness. He was 91. Born in Bristol, England, in 1912, Langton was raised in Montreal and Vancouver, Canada, and began his acting career at 17 with the Vancouver Little Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1993 | TOM JACOBS, Tom Jacobs is a regular contributor to The Times
In Nick Deer's play "The Art of Success," William Hogarth refers to himself as "an artist who likes to eat." Dedicated to his work but lacking wealthy patrons, the 18th-Century painter faced the prospect of spending his life starving in a garret somewhere when he came up with a creative solution to his dilemma. In Deer's words, he became "the first artist in our culture to make his living as a businessman--to market his art."
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