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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1989 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Councilman Nate Holden, a long-shot mayoral candidate, reacted to a Los Angeles Times Poll that shows him trailing incumbent Tom Bradley by 52 points on Tuesday by saying that he does not believe in polls. Holden also declared, "If I were the mayor, we wouldn't have gangs roaming the streets killing people." Holden stepped up his campaign with a verbal broadside Tuesday, blaming Bradley for gangs, drugs, traffic and pollution.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
August 24, 2012 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
Facebook and Internet portals such as Google and Yahoo increasingly provide Americans their gateway for news, but the bulk of voters who catch up on current events daily turn to traditional sources, particularly local television stations, according to a nationwide poll. Traditional news sources on TV and in print also remain more trusted than the burgeoning alternative ecosystem of blogs, late-night comedy shows and social media outlets, the USC Annenberg/Los Angeles Times Poll on Politics and the Press found.
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BUSINESS
September 22, 1998
The Times begins a series of articles Wednesday on the state of small business in Southern California, based on a first-of-its-kind poll of 30,000 businesses from San Diego to Ventura. The poll was conducted by The Times and the USC Marshall School of Business. Among the findings: A majority of business owners do not believe critical problems that existed during the recession--government regulation, worker training and access to capital--have been addressed.
NATIONAL
August 23, 2012 | By David Lauter, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - With his running mate in place and his nominating convention looming, Republican Mitt Romney narrowly trails President Obama, according to a new nationwide poll of likely voters. Obama leads 48% to 45% among all registered voters in the survey and by 48% to 46% among those considered likely to vote, according to the USC Annenberg/Los Angeles Times poll on Politics and the Press. While those results are within the poll's margin of error, they speak to the remarkable stability of the presidential race, in which Obama has held a small lead in most polls since April.
NEWS
February 20, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Tom Bradley is not held responsible by the people for their growing disillusion about life in Los Angeles and seems certain to continue his reign as the city's longest-serving mayor by winning an unprecedented fifth term in April, the Los Angeles Times Poll has found. Bradley seems to share the same "Teflon" immunity from blame that former President Ronald Reagan enjoyed, in that Bradley escapes the public's scorn for crime, traffic and runaway growth.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most common reason Californians give for not voting in the June election is not lack of interest, nor disdain of the candidates. They were simply too busy to be bothered, the Los Angeles Times Poll found. And although most registered voters who skipped the June primary say they very likely will vote in November, the evidence is that many probably won't.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1997
In advance of Monday night's launch of the fall season, The Times surveyed 1,258 American adults for their views on the state of television. They were asked about their own viewing habits and their children's, whether there is too much sex and violence on the airwaves, whether government should take a greater role in policing programs, even how frequently they zap out commercials with their remote controls, among other questions. See A1 for the story and the numbers.
NEWS
January 24, 1995
A Majority Critical of Nation's Direction Of those Americans who believe the country is on the wrong track, crime and family breakdown are the reasons they cite most often. Do you think things in this country are generally going in the right direction or are they seriously off on the wrong track? Right direction: 35% Wrong track: 55% Don't know: 10% Why do you say things in this country are going in the right direction?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1992 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Underlining concern over San Diego's escalating violence, nearly three-quarters of city residents support the idea of a special tax to hire more police officers, a Los Angeles Times Poll found.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Ernie Kell has capitalized on his name recognition and his association with the rebuilding of downtown to forge a commanding lead over Councilwoman Jan Hall in the race for citywide elected mayor, a Los Angeles Times Poll has found. Striving to shed his figurehead appointive title and move into the newly created full-time mayor's job, Kell also has been far more successful than Hall in picking up support from voters who backed Luanne Pryor in last month's primary election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2012 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
California voters are losing faith in a proposed $68-billion bullet train project, saying the state has higher priorities, they would seldom use the service and they would halt public borrowing for construction if they could, a USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times poll found. A strong majority of voters have turned against the project just as Gov. Jerry Brown is pressuring the Legislature to green-light the start of construction in the Central Valley later this year, a major step in the plan to connect Los Angeles and San Francisco with high-speed rail service by about 2028.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2012 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Longer hours, less pay, higher costs for benefits. Those are some of the ways the workplace has changed for many Californians in the wake of the economic downturn, according to a new USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll . More than a third of those surveyed said their workplace conditions had gotten worse in the last year. More than half said they or someone they know had experienced reduced wages or hours at work. It's a natural consequence of an economic downturn - when layoffs occur, those left at work are asked to take on more responsibilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Charter schools have won over about half of California voters, but these independent, non-traditional public schools are not widely viewed as the solution to the state's education problems, according to a new poll. Among those surveyed in the USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times poll , 52% had a favorable opinion about charters; only 12% had an unfavorable impression. Asked whether charter schools or traditional schools provided a better education, 48% gave superior marks to charters; 24% considered traditional schools more effective.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2010 | By Cathleen Decker, Los Angeles Times
The road to redemption for the Republican Party in California may be even rougher than November's statewide electoral drubbing indicated, as a new Los Angeles Times/USC poll shows a deep reluctance among many voters to side with a GOP candidate and broad swaths of the state holding views on government's role that conflict with Republican tenets. California voters surveyed in the poll repudiated the party's stance on illegal immigration by endorsing a host of positions intended to make it easier for the undocumented to gain legal status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2002 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month into the campaign over secession, voters citywide are leaning against breaking the San Fernando Valley away from Los Angeles and overwhelmingly oppose independence for Hollywood, according to a Los Angeles Times poll. Secession remains popular in the Valley. After hearing a summary of arguments for and against secession, voters there said they favor a split from Los Angeles, 52% to 37%.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1998
The Times begins a series of articles Wednesday on the state of small business in Southern California, based on a first-of-its-kind poll of 30,000 businesses from San Diego to Ventura. The poll was conducted by The Times and the USC Marshall School of Business. Among the findings: A majority of business owners do not believe critical problems that existed during the recession--government regulation, worker training and access to capital--have been addressed.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
Crime and drugs--a deadly combination threatening a community in the midst of a redevelopment renaissance--are viewed by voters as the two biggest problems facing the city, according to a Los Angeles Times Poll. The growing scourge of gang warfare also ranked high on the list, indicating that personal safety issues are foremost in the minds of poll respondents. In combatting crime, the Police Department won particularly high marks.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2012 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Longer hours, less pay, higher costs for benefits. Those are some of the ways the workplace has changed for many Californians in the wake of the economic downturn, according to a new USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times Poll . More than a third of those surveyed said their workplace conditions had gotten worse in the last year. More than half said they or someone they know had experienced reduced wages or hours at work. It's a natural consequence of an economic downturn - when layoffs occur, those left at work are asked to take on more responsibilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1997
In advance of Monday night's launch of the fall season, The Times surveyed 1,258 American adults for their views on the state of television. They were asked about their own viewing habits and their children's, whether there is too much sex and violence on the airwaves, whether government should take a greater role in policing programs, even how frequently they zap out commercials with their remote controls, among other questions. See A1 for the story and the numbers.
NEWS
January 24, 1995
A Majority Critical of Nation's Direction Of those Americans who believe the country is on the wrong track, crime and family breakdown are the reasons they cite most often. Do you think things in this country are generally going in the right direction or are they seriously off on the wrong track? Right direction: 35% Wrong track: 55% Don't know: 10% Why do you say things in this country are going in the right direction?
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