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Los Angeles Times Festival

NEWS
February 26, 2014
Gwen P. Murakami was named Senior Vice President, Administration for the Los Angeles Times in February 2008 and oversees human resources, employee communications, public affairs and legal. She served as vice president/human resources from January 2004 after serving as acting director/human resources since December 2003. She was the director/employee relations from 2000 - 2004. In this role, she was responsible for guiding and developing a team of employee relations generalists assigned to internal client groups focused on various workforce issues related to key business initiatives.  Murakami joined the Times in 1999 as the senior human resources generalist for the advertising and marketing departments.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
It was a lopsided victory of winks over smirks at "With a Wink and a Smirk," a Saturday afternoon panel discussion at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books that featured comic novelists Diana Wagman, Jerry Stahl, Mark Haskell Smith and Jim Magnuson and was moderated by David Kipen. That revelation, though, didn't come until close to the end of a free-wheeling, fast-moving and very humorous chat that included each author reading just the very first page (no more, no less) from one of his or her recently published books, and touched on taboo humor topics and the source of humor in the comic novel.
FOOD
April 21, 2012
There's going to be a whole lot of cooking going on at the 17th annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on the USC campus Saturday and Sunday. In fact, there's an entire stage devoted to it. Saturday will kick off with Ink's Michael Voltaggio at 10:30 a.m., followed by "Top Chef's" Gail Simmons at 12:30 p.m. Voltaggio will return to the stage at 2 p.m., along with Mozza's Nancy Silverton, to discuss the Southern California food scene with Los Angeles Times Deputy Food Editor Betty Hallock.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
At the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Sunday, I got a chance to sit down with novelist and nonfiction writer Judith Freeman to discuss the lure of Southern California as a literary landscape, and also the influence of Raymond Chandler on the city and its cultural life. "When I moved here, one of the first writers that I started to read, through a friend of mine, was Raymond Chandler. And I thought, Wow, that's Los Angeles," Freeman said. "And I still think that he really got the city, he got underneath the city, he got everything about the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
During the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, writer Matthew Specktor sat down with L.A. Times staff writer Carolyn Kellogg to discuss his new novel, "American Dream Machine. " It's a book set in and around a fictional Hollywood talent agency, not unlike Creative Artists Agency, where Specktor's father works. He rattles off some of his favorite books about Hollywood. "I'm very fond of Michael Tolkin's 'The Player.' I'm very fond of 'Play It as It Lays.' I'm very fond of Budd Schulberg," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Alice Short
When you write a book that is titled "Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History," you probably expect a question something like this: What on Earth was the impetus for the work ... and the title? Florence Williams, the winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for science and technology, proved to be ready for the query. During a video chat at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Saturday, she explained that she had been nursing her second child and wondered about toxins in her breast milk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2013 | By Anna Gorman
Charles McKay makes a detailed spreadsheet of the authors he wants to hear during the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, typing in his first and second choices and getting tickets ahead of time. Jerry Oborn, from San Diego, said she goes about it another way: “I just wander around.” But McKay and Oborn both said they finish the festival the same way - with a long list of new books to read. MORE: The L.A. Times map of literary Los Angeles “It takes us months to get through all these books by authors who inspired us,” said McKay, who lives in the South Bay. McKay and Oborn were among 150,000 people expected to attend the 18th annual book festival this weekend at USC. Under clear and hot skies Saturday, visitors listened to poetry, watched cooking demonstrations, danced to local bands and shopped at dozens of makeshift bookstores.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Tracy Brown
Art aficionados planning to attend the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books this weekend will be able to watch artists create works live on the USC site as well as hear the many assembled writers. Artists' Row, a new feature at the festival, will house six artists who specialize in various media as they create pieces guided by the festival's theme, “Inspire Your Fire.” The artists will work throughout the weekend at the gathering at the University of Southern California; their pieces are expected to be finished by the end of the day on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Grand Park, squeezed between City Hall and other civic buildings downtown, is arguably the most beautiful new public space created in Los Angeles in many years. And since it opened in 2012, the people who run the park have been trying to encourage visitors to engage in a certain quiet and solitary activity--reading. Toward that end, Grand Park has placed four small “lending library” bookshelves at different corners of the park. And Saturday, it will host the second annual Grand Park Downtown Book Fest . “We think reading is one of the best ways to use Grand Park,” said programming director Julia Diamond.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
A Sunday morning Los Angeles Times Festival of Books panel brought together four bestselling female novelists to discuss "Fiction: Choices and Consequences," a topic that (perhaps unsurprisingly, given its general applicability) is relevant to all of their work. Warmly and humorously moderated by Leslie Schwartz, herself a novelist ("Angels Crest"), writers Lacy Crawford, Lian Dolan, Jane Green and Gigi Levangie began by summarizing their most recent books, all of which feature female protagonists and treat life crises that, to judge from the audience's rapt absorption, nods and tearful bursts of laughter, are far from inaccessible.
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