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Los Angeles Times Festival

ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Grand Park, squeezed between City Hall and other civic buildings downtown, is arguably the most beautiful new public space created in Los Angeles in many years. And since it opened in 2012, the people who run the park have been trying to encourage visitors to engage in a certain quiet and solitary activity--reading. Toward that end, Grand Park has placed four small “lending library” bookshelves at different corners of the park. And Saturday, it will host the second annual Grand Park Downtown Book Fest . “We think reading is one of the best ways to use Grand Park,” said programming director Julia Diamond.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts
Comedian Carol Burnett and author Joyce Carol Oates will be among the dozens of participants in the 18th annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books to be held this weekend on the USC campus. The popular two-day event gets underway at 10 a.m. Saturday and will include interviews with a number of authors as well as roundtable discussions with Times reporters on everything from the mayor's race to L.A. Noir. There will also be food, music and spoken word performances. Check out the full program schedule . The festival of books is only one of three major sporting and cultural events this weekend, making it a hectic one for police in Los Angeles and Long Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
It's probably safe to assume that the names Patti Smith and Dave Eggers are not uttered in the same sentence with any degree of regularity. But their appearance at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books could change all that. The rocker (whose "Just Kids" recently won the National Book Award for nonfiction) and the literary hipster (whose book "Zeitoun" won last year's Los Angeles Times Book Prize for current interest ) will appear together onstage at this year's book festival, which after 15 years at UCLA is moving to USC. The festival is scheduled for April 30 and May 1. More than 400 authors will participate in upward of 100 readings, panel discussions and, for a few — such as comedian Patton Oswalt ("Zombie Spaceship Wasteland")
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
The heroes and villains of crime novels tend to be average Joes driven into entertaining situations that are realistic enough that readers can understand, three crime authors said Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. Lee Goldberg, screenwriter for the former hit show "Monk" on USA Network and author of "Chase" and "Heist" with Janet Evanovich, was on the panel. In six months, Goldberg and Evanovich went from discussing books while having dinner to producing a New York Times bestseller.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Is it any surprise that on a warm spring day, thousands of Southern Californians went in search of a good book - and a chance to meet the person who wrote it? Not to Susan Burton, a retired school librarian from Fontana, who was among the crowds that converged Sunday morning on the USC campus for the final day of the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. "I think this is a fabulous place to be," she said as she stood in line with a friend to hear a discussion about crime writing with former L.A. Deputy Dist.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
Stephan Pastis, the former lawyer-turned-cartoonist behind the daily comic strip “Pearls before Swine,” (which runs in 650 newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times) recently made his first foray into long-form chapter books with “ Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made ”). While it should come as no surprise to anyone familiar with Pastis' irreverent sense of humor that the heavily illustrated whodunit is crammed with sly inside jokes, clueless characters and a hulking polar bear sidekick motivated by chicken nuggets and Rice Krispies Treats.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
In between some rants and caveman talk, "Divergent" trilogy author Veronica Roth explained Sunday how she came up with the female protagonist of her dystopian coming-of-age novel. Roth, 25, spoke at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books with Leigh Bardugo, whose books include "Shadow and Bone" and "Siege and Storm. " Bardugo set the stage by explaining why young adult novels such as "Divergent" are such hits. "That feeling never goes away of finding somewhere to belong," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
We have, when you think about it, always been an argumentative culture and society, even before we became a country. And we've been arguing ever since, for better or worse, and with varying degrees of skill. The nature of argument was part of the focus of the "American Arguments" panel at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Saturday moderated by L.A. Times editor-at-large Jim Newton, which drew together four history authors whose books explore some of the key formative arguments of American history.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | GINA PICCALO and LOUISE ROUG
For author E. Annie Proulx, who has lived happily in a big log house on 190 wind-swept acres in Wyoming for the last seven years, visits to Los Angeles are a vivid contrast to life in the state she's personified in her work. In conversation, and in her writing, she speaks of Wyoming with the tenderness of an old friend. "It's an extremely handsome place," she said by phone from her home last week. "Quiet. Peaceful. Windy." "The country poured open on each side ... the empty pale place and its roaring wind ... the distant antelope as tiny as mice," she writes in her 1999 book "From Close Range: Wyoming Stories" (Scribner)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts and Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
This weekend was always going to be a hectic one for police in Los Angeles and Long Beach. With hundreds of thousands of people descending on the cities for three major sporting and cultural events, authorities began preparations for security months ago. But things took on much greater weight Monday, when two bombs tore through the crowd at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The terrorist attack killed three people and wounded more than 170 others. Beyond the carnage, the bombing left Americans feeling skittish and forced U.S. law enforcement officials throughout the country to rethink their security plans for large upcoming gatherings like the marathon.
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