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Los Angeles Times Festival

ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
For B.J. Novak, whose father was an author, writing seemed like a “regular thing to do” but not necessarily a desired profession. “When I was a kid and people would ask, 'Are you going to be a writer like your dad?' I was like, 'Oh no, why would I do that dorky thing and go upstairs and write all day?' ” Novak said at his Los Angeles Times Festival of Books appearance Saturday. It wasn't until Novak, who grew up in Newton, Mass., saw Quentin Tarantino's “Pulp Fiction” that he realized “being a writer was cool and not [just]
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OPINION
July 22, 2008
As former editors of the Los Angeles Times Book Review (1975 through 2005), we are dismayed and troubled at the decision by Sam Zell and his managers to cease publishing the paper's Sunday Book Review. This step signals the end of an era begun 33 years ago when Otis Chandler, then the paper's publisher, announced the debut of the weekly section. Since then, the growth of the Los Angeles metropolitan region and the avidity of its numerous readers and writers has been palpable. For example, every year since its founding in 1996, the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books has attracted upward of 140,000 people to the UCLA campus from all walks of life throughout Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
When "Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing" first came out, publisher Dutton did not send Judy Blume around the country to talk about it. "There were no book tours!" she says. "I don't think they sent children's book writers on tour. " That was in the 1970s, when Blume had a string of hits for young readers, from small children to those grappling with adolescence. "Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret" (1970), "Then Again, Maybe I Won't" (1971), "Freckle Juice" (1971), "Deenie" (1973)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2010 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books will move its weekend-long celebration of the written word to the USC campus next spring after 15 years across town at UCLA, officials announced Wednesday. The change of venue to USC's main University Park campus south of downtown Los Angeles will offer a more central location, better access to public transportation, easier parking and the use of newly expanded university facilities for the annual event, leaders of the newspaper and USC said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts
Comedian Carol Burnett and author Joyce Carol Oates will be among the dozens of participants in the 18th annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books to be held this weekend on the USC campus. The popular two-day event gets underway at 10 a.m. Saturday and will include interviews with a number of authors as well as roundtable discussions with Times reporters on everything from the mayor's race to L.A. Noir. There will also be food, music and spoken word performances. Check out the full program schedule . The festival of books is only one of three major sporting and cultural events this weekend, making it a hectic one for police in Los Angeles and Long Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
It's probably safe to assume that the names Patti Smith and Dave Eggers are not uttered in the same sentence with any degree of regularity. But their appearance at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books could change all that. The rocker (whose "Just Kids" recently won the National Book Award for nonfiction) and the literary hipster (whose book "Zeitoun" won last year's Los Angeles Times Book Prize for current interest ) will appear together onstage at this year's book festival, which after 15 years at UCLA is moving to USC. The festival is scheduled for April 30 and May 1. More than 400 authors will participate in upward of 100 readings, panel discussions and, for a few — such as comedian Patton Oswalt ("Zombie Spaceship Wasteland")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Is it any surprise that on a warm spring day, thousands of Southern Californians went in search of a good book - and a chance to meet the person who wrote it? Not to Susan Burton, a retired school librarian from Fontana, who was among the crowds that converged Sunday morning on the USC campus for the final day of the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. "I think this is a fabulous place to be," she said as she stood in line with a friend to hear a discussion about crime writing with former L.A. Deputy Dist.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
The heroes and villains of crime novels tend to be average Joes driven into entertaining situations that are realistic enough that readers can understand, three crime authors said Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. Lee Goldberg, screenwriter for the former hit show "Monk" on USA Network and author of "Chase" and "Heist" with Janet Evanovich, was on the panel. In six months, Goldberg and Evanovich went from discussing books while having dinner to producing a New York Times bestseller.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Grand Park, squeezed between City Hall and other civic buildings downtown, is arguably the most beautiful new public space created in Los Angeles in many years. And since it opened in 2012, the people who run the park have been trying to encourage visitors to engage in a certain quiet and solitary activity--reading. Toward that end, Grand Park has placed four small “lending library” bookshelves at different corners of the park. And Saturday, it will host the second annual Grand Park Downtown Book Fest . “We think reading is one of the best ways to use Grand Park,” said programming director Julia Diamond.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
Stephan Pastis, the former lawyer-turned-cartoonist behind the daily comic strip “Pearls before Swine,” (which runs in 650 newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times) recently made his first foray into long-form chapter books with “ Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made ”). While it should come as no surprise to anyone familiar with Pastis' irreverent sense of humor that the heavily illustrated whodunit is crammed with sly inside jokes, clueless characters and a hulking polar bear sidekick motivated by chicken nuggets and Rice Krispies Treats.
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