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Los Angeles Times Festival

ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
We have, when you think about it, always been an argumentative culture and society, even before we became a country. And we've been arguing ever since, for better or worse, and with varying degrees of skill. The nature of argument was part of the focus of the "American Arguments" panel at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Saturday moderated by L.A. Times editor-at-large Jim Newton, which drew together four history authors whose books explore some of the key formative arguments of American history.
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OPINION
April 11, 2014 | Diana Wagman
Reading is such an improbable idea -- a miracle, really. Yet simple squiggles on a page, arranged just so, can convey ideas that change the way we think or introduce to us characters we love for a lifetime. In celebration of reading -- and of this weekend's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books -- we asked four readers (who also happen to be writers) to celebrate books that mattered in their lives. In 1975, when I was young, I went to hear James Baldwin speak. Afterward, I waited in a long line and finally got to stand before him. I told him that his book "Giovanni's Room" had made me want to be a writer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2010 | By Marjorie Miller, Los Angeles Times
On a typically blissful Sunday morning in Southern California, physically and figuratively about as far as you can get from eastern Afghanistan's Korengal Valley, hundreds of Angelenos have come to hear author Sebastian Junger speak about men at war on the other side of the world. Junger's latest book, "War" (Twelve: 290 pp., $26.99), has been compared to Michael Herr's Vietnam-era "Dispatches." To an audience at this year's Los Angeles Times Festival of Books at UCLA, the journalist is quick to highlight the differences between Herr's subject and his own. Vietnam, he explains, was an unpopular war fought with draftees, while the war in Afghanistan has broader public support and a force that willingly signed up to fight.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | GINA PICCALO and LOUISE ROUG
For author E. Annie Proulx, who has lived happily in a big log house on 190 wind-swept acres in Wyoming for the last seven years, visits to Los Angeles are a vivid contrast to life in the state she's personified in her work. In conversation, and in her writing, she speaks of Wyoming with the tenderness of an old friend. "It's an extremely handsome place," she said by phone from her home last week. "Quiet. Peaceful. Windy." "The country poured open on each side ... the empty pale place and its roaring wind ... the distant antelope as tiny as mice," she writes in her 1999 book "From Close Range: Wyoming Stories" (Scribner)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein and Joel Rubin
Authorities plan to beef up security at major events such as this weekend's Long Beach Grand Prix and the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing. Officials stressed there have been no threats made. The Los Angeles Police Department has already increased patrol at Dodger games. Large-scale outdoor events and venues present law enforcement with one of its greatest challenges, LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other security experts said. With thousands of people often spread over large areas, protest marches, road races, festivals and the like offer would-be attackers myriad opportunities to hide explosives among densely packed crowds.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2011 | Nicole Sperling
Years ago when Megan McDonald, the now-52-year-old author of the popular children's series "Judy Moody," was writing picture books for the 2- to 4-year-old set, a grandmother came through her signing line at an event in Florida. Clutched to the elderly woman's chest was a waterlogged, tattered copy of McDonald's debut, "Is This a House for Hermit Crab?" The woman proceeded to tell McDonald that because of her modest means, the book, which tells the simple story of a crustacean on a quest to find the perfect home, was the only one she owned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
A cannabis grower who courts trouble, a fictional Chinese detective who inevitably solves the puzzle and an actress whose navel stoked nationwide controversy — noir and Hollywood hold a special place in the Los Angeles mythos and were among the myriad subjects explored Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. The weekend event drew throngs of booklovers young and old and provided plenty of conundrums: Could one drop in on the panel discussing Hollywood icons at 2:30 p.m. and still catch an interview with author Maxine Hong Kingston at 3 p.m.?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Since background-check legislation was voted down in the Senate on Thursday, Adam Winkler, author of "Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America," expects a "lively" conversation at his panel on guns in America at the 18th annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. "This is a hot-button issue, and we have a collection of some of the leading scholars on guns and gun politics on this panel," he says. "Sometimes things can get heated. But I find that people are really hungering for a balanced, non-emotional discussion.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
When "Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing" first came out, publisher Dutton did not send Judy Blume around the country to talk about it. "There were no book tours!" she says. "I don't think they sent children's book writers on tour. " That was in the 1970s, when Blume had a string of hits for young readers, from small children to those grappling with adolescence. "Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret" (1970), "Then Again, Maybe I Won't" (1971), "Freckle Juice" (1971), "Deenie" (1973)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
A Sunday morning Los Angeles Times Festival of Books panel brought together four bestselling female novelists to discuss "Fiction: Choices and Consequences," a topic that (perhaps unsurprisingly, given its general applicability) is relevant to all of their work. Warmly and humorously moderated by Leslie Schwartz, herself a novelist ("Angels Crest"), writers Lacy Crawford, Lian Dolan, Jane Green and Gigi Levangie began by summarizing their most recent books, all of which feature female protagonists and treat life crises that, to judge from the audience's rapt absorption, nods and tearful bursts of laughter, are far from inaccessible.
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