Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles Times Festival
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Times Festival

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Is it any surprise that on a warm spring day, thousands of Southern Californians went in search of a good book - and a chance to meet the person who wrote it? Not to Susan Burton, a retired school librarian from Fontana, who was among the crowds that converged Sunday morning on the USC campus for the final day of the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. "I think this is a fabulous place to be," she said as she stood in line with a friend to hear a discussion about crime writing with former L.A. Deputy Dist.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
When "Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing" first came out, publisher Dutton did not send Judy Blume around the country to talk about it. "There were no book tours!" she says. "I don't think they sent children's book writers on tour. " That was in the 1970s, when Blume had a string of hits for young readers, from small children to those grappling with adolescence. "Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret" (1970), "Then Again, Maybe I Won't" (1971), "Freckle Juice" (1971), "Deenie" (1973)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
We have, when you think about it, always been an argumentative culture and society, even before we became a country. And we've been arguing ever since, for better or worse, and with varying degrees of skill. The nature of argument was part of the focus of the "American Arguments" panel at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Saturday moderated by L.A. Times editor-at-large Jim Newton, which drew together four history authors whose books explore some of the key formative arguments of American history.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Evan Kindley
"Authors who write personal material tend to get a bad rap," moderator Meghan Daum said at the start of Saturday's panel "Nonfiction: The Art of the Personal Story" at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. Personal writing is often seen, by literary and journalistic types alike, as embarrassing and narcissistic, less about craft than naked self-expression. But the four highly accomplished writers assembled here - Pico Iyer, author of "The Man Within My Head," a book about his complex relationship with Graham Greene; Leo Braudy, USC professor and author of "Trying To Be Cool: Growing Up in the 1950s"; Dinah Lenney, author of "The Object Parade," an autobiography in inanimate objects; and Leslie Jamison, author of the highly praised new essay collection "The Empathy Exams" - were nothing if not devoted to craft, and they could hardly be called navel-gazers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
A Sunday morning Los Angeles Times Festival of Books panel brought together four bestselling female novelists to discuss "Fiction: Choices and Consequences," a topic that (perhaps unsurprisingly, given its general applicability) is relevant to all of their work. Warmly and humorously moderated by Leslie Schwartz, herself a novelist ("Angels Crest"), writers Lacy Crawford, Lian Dolan, Jane Green and Gigi Levangie began by summarizing their most recent books, all of which feature female protagonists and treat life crises that, to judge from the audience's rapt absorption, nods and tearful bursts of laughter, are far from inaccessible.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Jasmine Elist
The author behind award-winning YA novels (including "The Au Pairs" series), fantasy novels (the "Blue Bloods" series, among others) and cheeky handbooks (including "How to Become Famous in Two Weeks or Less), is now delving into another literary genre: historical fantasy. Melissa de la Cruz's new novel, "The Ring and the Crown" (Disney-Hyperion, $17.99), is the first in a series of books that explores palace life within a British-Franco empire, during a time when social calendars, social climbing and magic were crucial elements in a girl's life.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | GINA PICCALO and LOUISE ROUG
For author E. Annie Proulx, who has lived happily in a big log house on 190 wind-swept acres in Wyoming for the last seven years, visits to Los Angeles are a vivid contrast to life in the state she's personified in her work. In conversation, and in her writing, she speaks of Wyoming with the tenderness of an old friend. "It's an extremely handsome place," she said by phone from her home last week. "Quiet. Peaceful. Windy." "The country poured open on each side ... the empty pale place and its roaring wind ... the distant antelope as tiny as mice," she writes in her 1999 book "From Close Range: Wyoming Stories" (Scribner)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Since background-check legislation was voted down in the Senate on Thursday, Adam Winkler, author of "Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America," expects a "lively" conversation at his panel on guns in America at the 18th annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. "This is a hot-button issue, and we have a collection of some of the leading scholars on guns and gun politics on this panel," he says. "Sometimes things can get heated. But I find that people are really hungering for a balanced, non-emotional discussion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
A cannabis grower who courts trouble, a fictional Chinese detective who inevitably solves the puzzle and an actress whose navel stoked nationwide controversy — noir and Hollywood hold a special place in the Los Angeles mythos and were among the myriad subjects explored Sunday at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. The weekend event drew throngs of booklovers young and old and provided plenty of conundrums: Could one drop in on the panel discussing Hollywood icons at 2:30 p.m. and still catch an interview with author Maxine Hong Kingston at 3 p.m.?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts and Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
This weekend was always going to be a hectic one for police in Los Angeles and Long Beach. With hundreds of thousands of people descending on the cities for three major sporting and cultural events, authorities began preparations for security months ago. But things took on much greater weight Monday, when two bombs tore through the crowd at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The terrorist attack killed three people and wounded more than 170 others. Beyond the carnage, the bombing left Americans feeling skittish and forced U.S. law enforcement officials throughout the country to rethink their security plans for large upcoming gatherings like the marathon.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|