Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles Times Festival
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Times Festival

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
T.C. Boyle will publish two upcoming novels with Ecco, the publisher announced. As NPR noted , Boyle has been at Viking for three decades. Ecco's president and publisher, Dan Halpern, said in a statement Monday that “[f]or forty years now I've admired Tom's work -- and early on published him in my magazine, Antaeus -- so it's with real excitement that I welcome him to Ecco, where we can't wait to expand his already wonderful readership and introduce him to a new generation of readers.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Grand Park, squeezed between City Hall and other civic buildings downtown, is arguably the most beautiful new public space created in Los Angeles in many years. And since it opened in 2012, the people who run the park have been trying to encourage visitors to engage in a certain quiet and solitary activity--reading. Toward that end, Grand Park has placed four small “lending library” bookshelves at different corners of the park. And Saturday, it will host the second annual Grand Park Downtown Book Fest . “We think reading is one of the best ways to use Grand Park,” said programming director Julia Diamond.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
Gwen P. Murakami was named Senior Vice President, Administration for the Los Angeles Times in February 2008 and oversees human resources, employee communications, public affairs and legal. She served as vice president/human resources from January 2004 after serving as acting director/human resources since December 2003. She was the director/employee relations from 2000 - 2004. In this role, she was responsible for guiding and developing a team of employee relations generalists assigned to internal client groups focused on various workforce issues related to key business initiatives.  Murakami joined the Times in 1999 as the senior human resources generalist for the advertising and marketing departments.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
If Los Angeles can have a book festival -- the just-concluded Los Angeles Times Festival of Books -- and even the suburb of nearby Duarte (pop. 21,000) can have one, why not Pasadena? Pasadena is famous for the Rose Parade, Caltech and Jackie Robinson, among other things, but the city of 137,000 also has its own proud literary tradition, as the writer Larry Wilson recently reminded us. “From James M. Cain's 'Mildred Pierce' to Raymond Chandler's 'The High Window,' from John Ball's Virgil Tibbs mysteries including 'In the Heat of the Night' to Meggs Brown's macabre murder mystery 'Saturday Games,'… plenty of novels and short stories have been set in Pasadena,”  Wilson wrote recently in the Pasadena Star News.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
During the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, writer Matthew Specktor sat down with L.A. Times staff writer Carolyn Kellogg to discuss his new novel, "American Dream Machine. " It's a book set in and around a fictional Hollywood talent agency, not unlike Creative Artists Agency, where Specktor's father works. He rattles off some of his favorite books about Hollywood. "I'm very fond of Michael Tolkin's 'The Player.' I'm very fond of 'Play It as It Lays.' I'm very fond of Budd Schulberg," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Bestselling author Maureen Johnson stopped in at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books video booth to talk with me about her new book, "The Madness Underneath," the second in the series that began with "The Name of the Star. " The popular young-adult series features an American girl in London who tries to figure out who -- or what -- is behind a series of Jack the Ripper copycat murders, as she explains using her hands. VIDEO: AUTHOR INTERVIEWS FROM FESTIVAL OF BOOKS "Because they are mysteries, because the world is structured in the way it is, I knew all the rules -- and I've put a little bomb at the end of each book," she warned.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
"The amazing thing about James Brown, for me," says R.J. Smith, "is you can't figure him out. " That's not uncommon for a music journalist, but it reveals just how complex Brown was -- Smith was his biographer. Smith, the author of 2012's "The One: The Life and Music of James Brown," dropped by our video booth at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books to talk about his book and about James Brown, the godfather of soul. "He was a civil rights arbiter, and he was a Republican," Smith tells L.A. Times features editor Alice Short.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
At the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Sunday, I got a chance to sit down with novelist and nonfiction writer Judith Freeman to discuss the lure of Southern California as a literary landscape, and also the influence of Raymond Chandler on the city and its cultural life. "When I moved here, one of the first writers that I started to read, through a friend of mine, was Raymond Chandler. And I thought, Wow, that's Los Angeles," Freeman said. "And I still think that he really got the city, he got underneath the city, he got everything about the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Is it any surprise that on a warm spring day, thousands of Southern Californians went in search of a good book - and a chance to meet the person who wrote it? Not to Susan Burton, a retired school librarian from Fontana, who was among the crowds that converged Sunday morning on the USC campus for the final day of the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. "I think this is a fabulous place to be," she said as she stood in line with a friend to hear a discussion about crime writing with former L.A. Deputy Dist.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Before he started his latest book,  Demetri Martin  got a really nice pen. It wasn't a regular pen, he said, but "a really fancy pen to do the drawings," Martin, the stand-up comedian, writer and actor, said Sunday afternoon at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books . "I bought like 40 different little nibs," lots of special ink and a wide variety of paper, Martin said. "That was probably two or three weeks, I spent $500 to $600.... I was just procrastinating. " FULL COVERAGE: FESTIVAL OF BOOKS But "it doesn't look any different after all that," he lamented.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|