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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1993
The U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee approved $244 million Wednesday for an array of Los Angeles transportation projects, including subway construction and design of a high-tech bus. The funding is part of a $4.5-billion bill that includes transportation projects nationwide, said Michael Bustamante, spokesman for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. The bill is expected to reach the Senate floor next week, he said. The measure includes: * $69.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2011 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
Moving to address problems in Los Angeles' embattled Transportation Department, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa on Friday nominated one of his closest deputies to lead the agency and installed a top police commander to oversee reform. The department has come under intense scrutiny in recent months, including sharply critical audits and inquiries into a little-known parking ticket appeals operation. Two city traffic officers were placed on leave recently after allegations that they participated in a pornographic film involving use of a city vehicle and city uniforms.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1992 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commuters riding the Metrolink train to downtown will have to take a shuttle bus to the Van Nuys train stop for at least six months after the service begins Oct. 26 due to lack of parking space there, Los Angeles city transportation officials said Tuesday. The shuttle bus from a lot half a mile away will operate for up to a year because the city has yet to purchase land for a parking lot next to the stop, they said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2003 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
It has been 40 years since the last clang-clang-clang of a trolley in Los Angeles. The Yellow Car -- the city's local electric-car line -- made its final run March 31, 1963, a farewell tour on the "V" Line from Los Angeles City College on Vermont Avenue to Pico Boulevard. Two years earlier, the interurban Red Cars that once ran from Redlands to Santa Monica for a penny a mile had made their last runs. Once both were gone, so was the golden age of mass transit in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1988
The 20 longest streets within Los Angeles city limits: STREET: MILES 1. Sepulveda Boulevard: 25.4 2. Mulholland Drive: 23.8 3. Figueroa Street: 22.2 4. Sunset Boulevard: 20.2 5. Western Avenue: 20.0 6. Vermont Avenue: 19.8 7. Victory Boulevard: 17.9 8. Vanowen Street: 17.0 9. Roscoe Boulevard: *16.4 10. Foothill Boulevard: 16.4 11. Ventura Boulevard: 16.1 12. Sherman Way: 15.9 13. Laurel Canyon Boulevard: 15.3 14. San Fernando Road: **15.1 15. Burbank Boulevard: 15.1 16. Oxnard Street: 15.0 17.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1999 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' Metro Blue Line trains had more accidents involving pedestrians last year than any other light rail system in the state, the Public Utilities Commission reported Thursday.
NEWS
May 23, 1985
The City Council, concerned about a proposed Los Angeles transportation plan that calls for widening Lincoln Boulevard from four to six lanes, voted to ask the staff to evaluate and comment on the plan. Council members said they were concerned that the Los Angeles environmental impact report does not include Santa Monica.
NEWS
April 6, 1994 | NORA ZAMICHOW and VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Less than three months after the Northridge earthquake knocked down two sections of the world's busiest thoroughfare, Gov. Pete Wilson announced Tuesday that the Santa Monica Freeway will reopen next week, ending frustrating delays and bottlenecks for thousands of commuters. State officials hope the final cleanup of construction work can be completed early April 12 in time to let rush-hour traffic inaugurate the two new freeway bridges at La Cienega and Washington boulevards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1993 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Transportation Commission on Wednesday expanded a free taxi ride program formerly restricted to residents of riot-torn areas to include needy residents throughout the county. The program, dubbed Operation Food Basket because it provided transportation in neighborhoods where markets had been burned, will now offer residents from Pacoima to El Monte free taxi rides to doctors' offices, food banks, battered women's shelters and other locations 24 hours a day.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | JOHN HURST and RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Joining the Cherokee Nation has been worth millions of dollars in construction work to Jon McGrath. The blue-eyed, fair-skinned contractor from Tulsa, Okla., who is 1/64 American Indian, has obtained $19 million in minority subcontracts on the rapid transit system in Los Angeles--more than any other "disadvantaged" firm. McGrath's Cherokee ancestry is the equivalent of having a great-great-great-great-grandparent who was a full-blooded Indian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City Council adopted a plan Wednesday to accommodate 611,000 more people in Los Angeles by 2010, and agreed to conduct six-month reviews of whether transportation improvements are keeping pace with population growth. The reviews were approved to address complaints by slow-growth advocates that the plan does not protect neighborhoods if growth overwhelms freeways, streets and commuter rail lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2001 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that small things can make a big difference, Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn announced Wednesday that more than two dozen of the city's most dangerous intersections would be improved to ease congestion and make them safer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2001 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traffic-weary motorists who try to get around freeway congestion by cutting through residential streets will face a bumpy road if many Los Angeles homeowners get their way. Frustrated with increased speeding through their neighborhoods, homeowners throughout the city requested speed humps on 350 streets in the last 12 months, nearly 50% more applications than in the previous fiscal year, according to city officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2001
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority will hold a workshop to brief its board members on a preliminary environmental impact report for the San Fernando Valley east-west busway project, agency officials said Monday. The session will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday in the third-floor board room of MTA headquarters, One Gateway Plaza downtown, agency officials said. Public comment will be included. The board will not take formal action on the report before July 26.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2001 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the third time in a century, Los Angeles and state planners are trying to reshape Glendale Boulevard in Echo Park to meet Southern California's evolving transportation needs. And they are not finding it easy going. Before World War II, Glendale was a main thoroughfare for Red Car trolleys serving downtown, entering or leaving a tunnel at Beverly Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mandeville Canyon is taking its lumps over controversial new speed bumps. Residents living at the bottom of the 1,200-home neighborhood persuaded Los Angeles traffic engineers to install a pair of asphalt bumps a month ago to put the brakes on speeders. But those living at the upper end of 5-mile-long Mandeville Canyon Road say that speeding was never a problem and that the bumps are safety hazards, which dangerously delay ambulances and firetrucks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1993
Los Angeles County transportation officials gave preliminary approval Wednesday for free rides aboard the city's newest subway line between MacArthur Park and Union Station. The Los Angeles County Transportation Commission's Planning and Mobility Improvement Committee voted Wednesday for free fares on the Metro Red Line--whose first leg is scheduled to open Jan. 30--for the first two months of operation. The LACTC board is expected to vote on the committee's recommendation later this month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1987
The Southern California Assn. of Governments on Monday began a $500,000, 18-month study of traffic problems in a wide area northeast of downtown Los Angeles. Announcing the study, Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre said he hoped that it would show the need for new forms of mass transportation, such as a light-rail line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2001
Staying in Los Angeles on a holiday weekend offers a rare chance to sample the city that its streets and freeways were built for. You can breeze from the San Fernando Valley to the Westside so quickly you might think you'd drifted back 40 years. Traffic zips along even at the infamously congested junction of the San Diego and Ventura freeways--at least until the holiday horde begins inching back to the city like an elephant through a python.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A trio of projects planned for the notoriously congested 101-405 freeway interchange won't eliminate congestion and will provide only temporary relief to one of the state's most reviled traffic quagmires, transit officials said. The junction of the Ventura and San Diego freeways is way past its prime, they added. Replacement is unrealistic because of the restricted space, the number of homes and businesses that would have to be condemned, and a price tag exceeding $1 billion.
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