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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1992
Rail mass transit has not been an easy sell in the car culture of Southern California. That has begun to change with the success of the Long Beach-to-Los Angeles Blue Line. But the willingness to pay for rail is undermined when there are suggestions that someone is playing fast and loose with the public's money. That's why the Los Angeles Transportation Commission had better get a handle, and fast, on questions being raised about the financial propriety of spending on projects.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1995 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the chagrin of ethics watchdogs, Los Angeles city officials twice this week have softened the blow of fines levied against firms for laundering campaign money to City Hall politicians. On Thursday, the Los Angeles Transportation Commission voted 6-0 to permit Bell Cab Cooperative to expand its operations by absorbing 250 "bandit cabs" into its fleet--only months after Bell agreed to pay $85,000 in fines for disguising the source of campaign contributions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991
The article by Laura Lake on Mobil Oil's M-70 replacement pipeline (Commentary, April 28) gives the impression that citizens can do nothing more to control the activities concerning construction of this line. This is simply not true. The Los Angeles Transportation Commission, in a knee-jerk reaction, did certify the environmental impact report and approve the project, but a new procedure initiated by homeowners could allow for further public input. For the Board of Public Works must observe state environmental law by requiring a public hearing before allowing that department's bureau of engineering to issue a discretionary permit for pipeline construction under city streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1992
Rail mass transit has not been an easy sell in the car culture of Southern California. That has begun to change with the success of the Long Beach-to-Los Angeles Blue Line. But the willingness to pay for rail is undermined when there are suggestions that someone is playing fast and loose with the public's money. That's why the Los Angeles Transportation Commission had better get a handle, and fast, on questions being raised about the financial propriety of spending on projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1995 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the chagrin of ethics watchdogs, Los Angeles city officials twice this week have softened the blow of fines levied against firms for laundering campaign money to City Hall politicians. On Thursday, the Los Angeles Transportation Commission voted 6-0 to permit Bell Cab Cooperative to expand its operations by absorbing 250 "bandit cabs" into its fleet--only months after Bell agreed to pay $85,000 in fines for disguising the source of campaign contributions.
NEWS
September 12, 1987 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
A bill to do away with Los Angeles County's principal transportation agencies and place bus, commuter rail and highway authority under a superagency run by a board of high-level local officials cleared the Legislature on Friday and was sent to the governor. The new agency would take over all present operations and future planning and construction projects of the RTD and the county Transportation Commission within the next one-year period.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Dozens of irate bus riders, concerned about possible massive cuts in transit service, disrupted a Los Angeles County Transportation Commission meeting Wednesday after the chairman tried to limit their public comments. Chanting "No Cuts! No Cuts!" and "Sit In! Sit In!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1991 | RONALD L. SOBLE and MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Now that Los Angeles has settled the political questions of where rapid transit trains will run, roughly how much they should cost and who will pay to build them, the Southern California Rapid Transit District faces an equally sticky decision: Will its transit police be able to police its transit?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1988
Two city commission members out of about 200 appointed by Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley will resign because they cannot assure their own attendance at meetings, Deputy Mayor Mike Gage said Monday. Robert Hannay, who sits on the Social Service Commission, will resign because he expects conflicts with his job, Gage said. The second commissioner will resign from the Transportation Commission, but Gage would not identify the individual.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1992 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commuters riding the Metrolink train to downtown will have to take a shuttle bus to the Van Nuys train stop for at least six months after the service begins Oct. 26 due to lack of parking space there, Los Angeles city transportation officials said Tuesday. The shuttle bus from a lot half a mile away will operate for up to a year because the city has yet to purchase land for a parking lot next to the stop, they said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1991 | RONALD L. SOBLE and MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Now that Los Angeles has settled the political questions of where rapid transit trains will run, roughly how much they should cost and who will pay to build them, the Southern California Rapid Transit District faces an equally sticky decision: Will its transit police be able to police its transit?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991
The article by Laura Lake on Mobil Oil's M-70 replacement pipeline (Commentary, April 28) gives the impression that citizens can do nothing more to control the activities concerning construction of this line. This is simply not true. The Los Angeles Transportation Commission, in a knee-jerk reaction, did certify the environmental impact report and approve the project, but a new procedure initiated by homeowners could allow for further public input. For the Board of Public Works must observe state environmental law by requiring a public hearing before allowing that department's bureau of engineering to issue a discretionary permit for pipeline construction under city streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1988
Two city commission members out of about 200 appointed by Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley will resign because they cannot assure their own attendance at meetings, Deputy Mayor Mike Gage said Monday. Robert Hannay, who sits on the Social Service Commission, will resign because he expects conflicts with his job, Gage said. The second commissioner will resign from the Transportation Commission, but Gage would not identify the individual.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Dozens of irate bus riders, concerned about possible massive cuts in transit service, disrupted a Los Angeles County Transportation Commission meeting Wednesday after the chairman tried to limit their public comments. Chanting "No Cuts! No Cuts!" and "Sit In! Sit In!"
NEWS
September 12, 1987 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
A bill to do away with Los Angeles County's principal transportation agencies and place bus, commuter rail and highway authority under a superagency run by a board of high-level local officials cleared the Legislature on Friday and was sent to the governor. The new agency would take over all present operations and future planning and construction projects of the RTD and the county Transportation Commission within the next one-year period.
NEWS
April 4, 1991
A workshop to get ideas from the public on proposed designs for the Claremont Depot commuter train and bus transit center will be held Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Claremont Library, 208 Harvard Ave. Claremont is planning to refurbish an old train depot to become a stop on a commuter rail line proposed by the Los Angeles Transportation Commission. It would also serve local and regional bus lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1992
Privately run Foothill Transit has taken over two bus lines, 486 and 488, formerly run by the Southern California Rapid Transit District, officials said Monday. Foothill Transit began servicing the lines Sunday, completing a 1988 Los Angeles Transportation Commission plan for them to take over 14 RTD lines. The two lines run from Puente Hills Mall and Glendora/West Covina to downtown Los Angeles. Foothill Transit regularly serves the Pomona and San Gabriel valleys.
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