Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLos Angeles Transportation Federal Aid
IN THE NEWS

Los Angeles Transportation Federal Aid

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1998 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for Latino leaders, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's board of directors put off a vote Thursday on its recovery plan in hopes that two weeks of additional study will find transit alternatives to a subway extension into the Eastside. "They're making progress," said Rep.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1998
President Clinton signed a spending bill Wednesday that allocates $62 million to keep the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's Hollywood-to-North Hollywood subway extension on track to open in two years. "We are delighted," MTA chief executive Julian Burke said. The spending bill includes $8 million to study mass transit alternatives for Los Angeles' Eastside and Mid-City, where subway extensions have been put on hold, and $3 million for bus purchases.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 18, 1998 | JIM NEWTON and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a stark demonstration of the high-stakes, ethnically charged debate over the future of Los Angeles' subway, a group of influential Latino legislators on Friday privately demanded that Mayor Richard Riordan deliver more mass transit to East Los Angeles or face a concerted effort to cut off federal money for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, whose board the mayor chairs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1998 | RICHARD SIMON and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a potentially serious setback for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, a key congressional panel recommended Wednesday that the Los Angeles subway receive $30 million in the next fiscal year--far less than the $100 million sought to continue building the Metro Rail project to North Hollywood. If approved by Congress, the recommendation of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1998 | RICHARD SIMON and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a potentially serious setback for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, a key congressional panel recommended Wednesday that the Los Angeles subway receive $30 million in the next fiscal year--far less than the $100 million sought to continue building the Metro Rail project to North Hollywood. If approved by Congress, the recommendation of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1998
President Clinton signed a spending bill Wednesday that allocates $62 million to keep the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's Hollywood-to-North Hollywood subway extension on track to open in two years. "We are delighted," MTA chief executive Julian Burke said. The spending bill includes $8 million to study mass transit alternatives for Los Angeles' Eastside and Mid-City, where subway extensions have been put on hold, and $3 million for bus purchases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1997 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adding to the MTA's litany of woes, the chairman of a key House spending committee suggested Tuesday that Los Angeles emphasize busways rather than the problem-plagued subway as a better solution to the city's clogged freeways. Rep. Frank Wolf (R-Va.), chairman of the transportation appropriations subcommittee, told Metropolitan Transportation Authority officials: "Your project is controversial out there and back here . . . and I wonder if maybe you should put more money toward busways."
NEWS
March 21, 1997 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sharply escalating their pressure on Los Angeles transit administrators, U.S. officials on Thursday said they have determined that the city, in defiance of Congress, continued to improperly divert funds from its airports to its municipal coffers, jeopardizing $70 million in critically needed subway construction money. Joyce N. Fleischman, acting inspector general of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1996
The $1.8-billion Alameda Corridor project cleared another legislative hurdle in Washington on Tuesday when a Senate subcommittee vetted plans for federal seed money for the 20-mile Los Angeles rail cargo artery. Sen. Mark Hatfield (R-Ore.), the chairman of the subcommittee that oversees transportation spending, backed a section of the bill that calls for $59 million to be given to the California Infrastructure Bank.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1996
After months of lobbying by local and state officials, Congress approved $59 million Monday for the planned Alameda Corridor route. The funding was included in the Omnibus Appropriations Bill, which President Clinton is expected to sign. The money is to be used to leverage a $400-million federal loan to help pay for construction of the 20-mile road-and-rail thoroughfare, which officials say will open in 2001. The final price tag is expected to top $1.8 billion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1998 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for Latino leaders, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's board of directors put off a vote Thursday on its recovery plan in hopes that two weeks of additional study will find transit alternatives to a subway extension into the Eastside. "They're making progress," said Rep.
NEWS
April 18, 1998 | JIM NEWTON and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a stark demonstration of the high-stakes, ethnically charged debate over the future of Los Angeles' subway, a group of influential Latino legislators on Friday privately demanded that Mayor Richard Riordan deliver more mass transit to East Los Angeles or face a concerted effort to cut off federal money for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, whose board the mayor chairs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key congressional panel Tuesday cut back federal funding for Los Angeles subway construction to its lowest annual level this decade, allocating $61.5 million--short of the $100 million sought by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. But MTA officials said they should be able to keep the Hollywood-to-San Fernando Valley subway extension on track by dipping into reserve funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key congressional panel Tuesday cut back federal funding for Los Angeles subway construction to its lowest annual level this decade, allocating $61.5 million--short of the $100 million sought by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. But MTA officials said they should be able to keep the Hollywood-to-San Fernando Valley subway extension on track by dipping into reserve funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An influential congressman visited Los Angeles on Monday to assess the region's traffic problems. But because the lawmaker's time is valuable and L.A.'s chronically congested streets and freeways make scheduling problematic, his survey was conducted from a helicopter, high above the immobile lines of bright red taillights. Like car salesmen descending on a customer with cash in hand, local transportation officials--including Mayor Richard Riordan--lobbied Rep. Bud Shuster (R-Pa.
NEWS
June 25, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON and HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority appeared to have put one battle behind it Tuesday by ending a dispute with the city of Los Angeles, and then gained ground in another fight when a key congressional panel recommended a $76-million federal appropriation for the Metro Rail subway project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1996
Stepping up his bitter cross-country feud with Mayor Richard Riordan, a Virginia congressman called on the U.S. Transportation Department inspector general Wednesday to investigate Los Angeles' transfer of $31 million in airport funds to the city treasury. Frank Wolf (R-Va.), chairman of the House Transportation Appropriations Subcommittee, also sent a letter to Transportation Secretary Federico Pena urging him to "act swiftly to stop the blatant illegal actions of the city of Los Angeles."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Led by angry San Fernando Valley lawmakers, the Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to freeze $200 million in contributions to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority because of proposed delays to a long-sought Valley rail line. The 9-2 vote--following nearly an hour of often-emotional debate--blocks the payments until city and MTA officials rewrite a regional "recovery plan" to move up the start of construction of the east-west line across the Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1997 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backing down in the face of federal threats to withhold $70 million in subway construction funds, Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan ordered repayment Thursday of nearly $1.1 million in airport revenues that an audit determined was improperly diverted to the city's general fund. The move came only days after federal transportation officials formally notified the city that auditors had found an improper diversion of airport funds to finance city operations.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|