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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
After one of the most divisive periods since busing for integration ended in the early 1980s, the Los Angeles Board of Education heads into a new year today facing several challenges, not the least of which will be to heal the wounds of a teachers' strike that turned the school district into a battleground. This morning, the board will elect a new president to succeed Roberta Weintraub, the veteran east San Fernando Valley representative who presided over a year dominated by labor troubles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 14, 1999
Caprice Young, District No. 3 1) Yes. I think the No. 1 reason why the district is in the mess that it's in is that, for the last 15 years, parents and businesses, then significant numbers of people who ought to be stakeholders in the district, have given up and not participated. I think that has meant that the unions and the people who are impacted every day--teachers, predominately, and the different employee unions--have really run the district.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1998 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to improve the performance of its lowest-achieving students, the Los Angeles Unified School District has embarked on a $10-million project with five private firms that will offer teacher training and oversee tutoring on 83 campuses. "The idea here is to provide whatever assistance these children need to improve their literacy," Supt. Ruben Zacarias said at a news conference Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1998 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to improve the performance of its lowest-achieving students, the Los Angeles Unified School District has embarked on a $10-million project with five private firms that will offer teacher training and oversee tutoring on 83 campuses. "The idea here is to provide whatever assistance these children need to improve their literacy," Supt. Ruben Zacarias said at a news conference Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1990 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rough corner of South-Central Los Angeles, where thugs rule the streets with their drugs and their guns, David Huff long ago made a promise to himself: If he accomplished anything as a father, it would be to give his daughter a chance to break out of the ghetto. Education, he thought, was the way. So he sat by her side as she did her homework at night. He bought her a secondhand piano in the hope that she might develop an interest in music.
OPINION
March 14, 1999
Caprice Young, District No. 3 1) Yes. I think the No. 1 reason why the district is in the mess that it's in is that, for the last 15 years, parents and businesses, then significant numbers of people who ought to be stakeholders in the district, have given up and not participated. I think that has meant that the unions and the people who are impacted every day--teachers, predominately, and the different employee unions--have really run the district.
SPORTS
July 13, 1985
We were shocked when El Camino Real baseball forfeits were rescinded. This was compounded by the reseeding that made El Camino a fourth-place team. Athletics are governed by rules. One of the values of athletics is to learn to play by the rules. You break the rules, and you pay the penalty. No team wants to forfeit a game, but if a rule is broken, the team must pay the consequences. Penalizing the team for an individual mistake may not be fair, but how can you change a policy during the season?
BUSINESS
December 1, 1989
The Times is to be commended for the recent article (Part A, Nov. 21) and editorial detailing the critical educational problems facing our so-called "receiver" schools. As you reported, 20,000 students are bused every day from overcrowded schools to schools that lack the teachers, aides, and other materials needed for effective bilingual instruction. The Westside communities I represent on the Los Angeles Board of Education are confronted with this problem daily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1993 | JONATHAN ALCORN / For The Times, Times Researcher CATHERINE GOTTLIEB
When the school day ends at least 100,000 children who attend kindergarten through the sixth grade in the Los Angeles Unified School District fend for themselves until their working parents get home. LA's Best, an after-school program established in 1988, offers 3,800 of these children a supervised place to go at 19 elementary schools in areas identified by the district as most vulnerable to drug, gang and crime activity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2000 | RANDY ROSS, Randy Ross is vice president of the Los Angeles Annenberg Metropolitan Project (LAAMP)
Low standards do cheat students, but a motion set to be heard today by the Los Angeles Unifed School District board misses the mark. Board member David Tokofsky's motion seeks to retain any second- or eighth-grade student whose Stanford 9 reading score is ranked at the lowest 5% nationally (that is, below the fifth percentile). Closer inspection reveals that a fifth-percentile threshold for student retention is both too low and too high.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1990 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rough corner of South-Central Los Angeles, where thugs rule the streets with their drugs and their guns, David Huff long ago made a promise to himself: If he accomplished anything as a father, it would be to give his daughter a chance to break out of the ghetto. Education, he thought, was the way. So he sat by her side as she did her homework at night. He bought her a secondhand piano in the hope that she might develop an interest in music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
After one of the most divisive periods since busing for integration ended in the early 1980s, the Los Angeles Board of Education heads into a new year today facing several challenges, not the least of which will be to heal the wounds of a teachers' strike that turned the school district into a battleground. This morning, the board will elect a new president to succeed Roberta Weintraub, the veteran east San Fernando Valley representative who presided over a year dominated by labor troubles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1996
As a new school year begins, parents may find themselves in a quandary about what to do with their children after school. For working parents, this may mean leaving them home alone. But what is it proper to leave a child alone? What can a parent do to ensure the child is safe, and what are some of the alternatives? Latchkey children are a cause of concern for many parents, child welfare advocates and law enforcement officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1998 | DIANNE WEDNER
An alliance of computer software manufacturers is seeking $300,000 from the Los Angeles Unifed School District to settle the trade group's allegations that a Woodland Hills school violated federal copyright laws by illegally copying software programs. Although school officials have denied wrongdoing, the school board is prepared to settle with the computer industry giants and to establish a team of technicians to seek out and replace pirated software, at a cost of about $5 million.
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