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NEWS
March 30, 1995 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The contest for the seat on the Los Angeles Unified School District board that represents the South Bay and part of Watts is widely viewed as a tossup. So much so that the powerful teachers' union has made no endorsement in the four-way race, choosing instead to save its strength for a likely runoff. "They all have strengths in different areas," said Inola F. Henry, who is head of United Teachers Los Angeles' political arm--the Political Action Council of Educators.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Richard Winton
A Bell High school drama teacher was charged Tuesday with multiple felony sex crimes involving two students a decade or more ago at a Los Angeles high school, and police suspect there may be other possible victims. Peter Christoph Gomez, 48, of La Habra, was teaching at Benjamin Franklin High School in Highland Park when authorities allege he sexually abused two students, who were 14 to 18 years old, between June 1999 and September 2003. Gomez, a popular and well-known drama and history teacher at Los Angeles Unified's Bell High School, made a brief appearance in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom Tuesday and pleaded not guilty to 26 felony counts.
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NEWS
March 24, 1994 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The group working to see Lomita secede from the Los Angeles Unified School District and manage its own schools has submitted a petition to county officials with enough signatures to require the county to either reject or endorse the effort. The Committee to Unify Lomita's Schools delivered a petition with 3,099 signatures to Los Angeles County officials last week. At least 2,400 signatures were required as a first step toward gaining educational autonomy for the city.
OPINION
October 23, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Segregating young children for whom English is a new language according to their fluency levels produces the best academic results, according to most research. So the Los Angeles Unified School District has little choice in the matter. As a result of a settlement with the U.S. Department of Education, which had accused the district of doing poorly by its English learners, the district was required to submit an evidence-based plan for improvement, and that plan calls for sorting the students by English skills.
NEWS
August 3, 1995 | HENRY CHU and BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a ringing triumph for longtime critics of the mammoth Los Angeles Unified School District, Gov. Pete Wilson signed into law Wednesday a bill that will ease the way for dissatisfied voters to carve up the nation's second-largest school system. At an afternoon ceremony in his office, Wilson brought closer to fruition a campaign dating back at least a quarter of a century, when detractors of the 708-square-mile district first suggested splintering it into smaller units.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
No sooner had Marshall High School senior Kyu Lee ducked out of an ethics and career course a few minutes early than his classmates began hollering for justice. "They wanted consequences," said Maggie Lapre, who instructs the experimental "Life Skills for the 21st Century" course designed to teach students right from wrong. "So I asked Lee for an apology, an hour of detention and for him to meet with a counselor." At first, Lee protested: "What did I do wrong? I didn't hurt anybody."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Motivated by falling test scores and the loss of high-achieving students, 18 schools--three times the number that typically apply--want to become part of the highly prized magnet system in the L.A. Unified School District. The schools hope to offer specialized courses ranging from Latin music to journalism and media technology. Magnets--considered the gems of the school system--offer smaller classes, more money for special activities and facilities and a handpicked faculty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2009 | By Jason Felch, Jessica Garrison and Jason Song
Altair Maine said he was so little supervised in his first few years of teaching at North Hollywood High School that he could "easily have shown a movie in class every day and earned tenure nonetheless." Before second-grade teacher Kimberly Patterson received tenure and the ironclad job protections it provides, she said, "my principal never set foot in my classroom while I was teaching." And when Virgil Middle School teacher Roberto Gonzalez came up for tenure, he discovered there was no evaluation for him on file.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1995
Grade 4 Reading Top 10 Schools School (District): % Passing Bay Laurel Elementary (Las Virgenes Unified): 65 Palm Crest Elementary (La Canada Unified): 61 Jefferson Elementary (Burbank Unified): 58 White Oak Elementary (Las Virgenes Unified): 56 Welby Way Elementary (Los Angeles Unified): 54 Emelita Street Elementary (Los Angeles Unified): 51 Sumac Elementary (Las Virgenes Unified): 50 Carpenter Avenue Elementary (Los Angeles Unified): 50 Balboa Gifted/High Ability Magnet (Los Angeles Unified):
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Richard Winton
A Bell High school drama teacher was charged Tuesday with multiple felony sex crimes involving two students a decade or more ago at a Los Angeles high school, and police suspect there may be other possible victims. Peter Christoph Gomez, 48, of La Habra, was teaching at Benjamin Franklin High School in Highland Park when authorities allege he sexually abused two students, who were 14 to 18 years old, between June 1999 and September 2003. Gomez, a popular and well-known drama and history teacher at Los Angeles Unified's Bell High School, made a brief appearance in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom Tuesday and pleaded not guilty to 26 felony counts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
Learn Civil War history by performing a play? Study fractions through exploration of musical scores? After five years of brutal cuts in arts education, Los Angeles Unified is gearing up to bring more music, dance, theater and visual arts into core academic classes under a three-year, $750,000 initiative to be announced Thursday by the Los Angeles nonprofit group funding the effort. The Los Angeles Fund for Public Education plans to announce the first grant of $150,000 to the Music Center, which will train 20 teachers how to integrate the arts into classrooms at five L.A. middle schools: Sun Valley, San Fernando, Adams, Berendo and South Gate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
The subject of the morning class was criminal investigation, and there was no hesitation on the part of the 17-year-old when he was asked to stand and explain aggravated assault. The boy related the story of how his father, estranged from his mother, had shown up at the house and begun pushing her around. He told of how police had come and explained to his mother the steps she would need to take to obtain a restraining order. School was in session at the Los Angeles Police Department's Ahmanson Training Center in Westchester as high school seniors dressed in brown khaki trousers and blue uniform shirts kicked off another day in an unusual law enforcement training program called the Police Orientation Preparation Program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Unified School District has hired more than 750 of the 1,000 security aides it decided to employ after the mass shooting last year at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn. The aides, equipped with radios, keep watch during school hours, reporting potential threats and other problems to administrators, district spokesman Tom Waldman said. The district announced in January that it would spend about $4 million to hire 1,087 aides. The move followed the December shooting deaths of 26 people, including 20 first-graders, at Sandy Hook Elementary School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
Half a dozen arms reached for the sky, some gently grazing a basketball as it escaped the court and thudded out of bounds at the Edward Roybal Learning Center. Despite their best efforts at trying to keep the ball in the game, both teams showed no hint of defeat, even after one was declared the winner. The Los Angeles Unified School District/Special Olympics Unified Basketball League's Eastern finals were underway, and the mood was decidedly different from that of other sports finals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
Students from Western Avenue Elementary's special education classes sat in the shade and counted rings on "tree cookies" taken from redwoods on a recent field trip. "This is where learning comes alive and is more meaningful," said teacher Mysie Dela Pena about the Christensen Math Science and Technology Center in San Pedro. "We talk about a lot of these elements in the classroom, but this is where they get the experience firsthand. " The interactive life science classroom is a beleaguered survivor of the Los Angeles Unified School District's budget cuts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
At Gault Street Elementary, waves of parents flow through the campus daily. Sometimes the tide is stronger, said parent center director Rosalva Waterford, but they are always there. Volunteers make copies for the teachers using one of the center's three copy machines - including the one they call la viejita (the old woman) a decades-old, yellowing behemoth that frequently gets passed over for the newer models. Parents sometimes help move classroom furniture for an activity or clean up afterward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2000
With the prospect of rewards and punishments looming, California schools dug in last spring to boost results on the Stanford 9 basic skills test. Here are the schools posting the biggest gains since statewide testing began in 1998. The first column lists the percentage of students at each school who scored at or above the 50th percentile (the national average) in 2000. The final column shows the percentage point increase over two years in the number of students attaining that benchmark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2000
An Aug. 20 chart on schools that posted the biggest gains on the Stanford 9 test was prepared before scores were available for Long Beach Unified School District. Three Long Beach campuses rank among schools posting the biggest gains since statewide testing began in 1998. The third column lists the percentage of students at each school who scored at or above the 50th percentile (the national average) in 2000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles school district's popular magnet program has a new deadline for applications this year - Nov. 16 - due to the early start of the school year. "Everything got moved up a month," said Felipe Echávarri, a coordinator for L.A. Unified's Student Integration Services. "We want parents to be aware. " Officials said families will receive automated phone reminders and an alert by postcard, but magnet-program brochures and applications are no longer mailed out. Those mailings ended last year, when the district switched to an online system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2012 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
For the second year in a row, Granada Hills Charter High School won the California Academic Decathlon as Los Angeles Unified schools continued to dominate at the battle of wits that is at risk of being cut by the district in next year's budget. Los Angeles Unified on Sunday schools claimed five of the top 10 spots in the competition in Sacramento consisting of 65 teams and more than 550 students, with El Camino Real and Marshall taking second and third places, respectively. Franklin took fifth place and Taft 10th, while Torrance's West High School came in eighth.
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