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NEWS
September 6, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years into a historic push to organize the region's multiethnic work force, Los Angeles labor unions have begun to see results, adding more than 85,000 members this year alone and building a network of political and community allies that is paying off in new laws and public support. Perhaps more than anywhere in the nation, unions here have embraced the more aggressive, sophisticated approach to organizing promoted by AFL-CIO President John J. Sweeney.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles school district and the teachers union reached a tentative agreement Friday that would prevent thousands of layoffs in exchange for 10 furlough days, which would shorten the school year by a week. Under the accord, teachers would lose pay for five instructional days plus four holidays and one training day, equivalent to about a 5% salary cut. The deal must by ratified by teachers and approved by the L.A. Board of Education. The school board is scheduled to vote on the plan at a meeting Tuesday; union members are expected to vote at schools beginning Wednesday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2000 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flush with success from the biggest union organizing drive since the 1930s, Los Angeles' labor leaders are setting ambitious political goals for the new year, including winning local, state and national electoral races, securing top-dollar contracts for unprecedented numbers of workers, and adding even more low-wage employees to their ranks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2009 | Phil Willon
The union representing Metrolink engineers filed a federal lawsuit Tuesday to halt the video-surveillance systems recently installed in all the commuter rail line's locomotives. Metrolink installed cameras as a direct response to the deadly 2008 Metrolink crash in Chatsworth that killed 25 people and apparently involved an engineer who had been text messaging on his cellphone. Metrolink officials said the purpose of the video recording system, which cost $1 million to install in all locomotives, was to ensure that engineers adhered to agency bans on cellphones, text messaging and allowing unauthorized passengers in the cab. However, Paul T. Sorrow, acting president of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen, called the cameras an "invasion of privacy" that violated federal law as well as the terms of the union's contract with Metrolink.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The protracted labor dispute at the New Otani Hotel & Garden in Los Angeles eluded resolution Monday, as the hotel's Tokyo management--in a long-awaited meeting with two of its L.A.-based employees--rejected requests to rehire three fired workers and meet directly with union officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1995
Sporting a suit and tie, Larry G. Williams stood before an attentive crowd. Homeless just five months ago, he told the story of his downward spiral, from family life to drug addiction and the streets. "I thought I was lost for the rest of my life," Williams, 45, said after his speech during the dedication this week of a $300,000 learning center at the Union Rescue Mission in Downtown Los Angeles.
NEWS
January 1, 1995
The Los Angeles County Federation of Labor donated a motor home to the East Los Angeles Health Task Force last month to improve programs for substance abuse and community outreach. The motor home sleeps six to eight people and has a fully equipped kitchen so patients can take it camping, said Jim Wood of the labor group. "I know most of the residents in the substance abuse and alcohol programs have never had an opportunity to go camping and just enjoy the benefits of getting away," Wood said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1993
A proposal to build a new headquarters for the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California next to Union Station in Downtown Los Angeles received a major boost with the endorsement of an MWD site selection task force. The full MWD board is scheduled to vote Dec. 14 on the recommendation to start formal talks with Catellus Development Corp., which proposed a 14-story MWD building just south of the transit center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1994
Angered by what they say is the prospect of an impasse in labor negotiations by Monday, a Police Protective League official said Friday that the union is preparing a new campaign that will include a search for embarrassing information about City Council members. "We are going to be soliciting adverse information on City Council members," said Geoffrey Garfield, union spokesman. "You'd be surprised at what cops know about people."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1993
A veteran police officer was elected interim president of the Police Protective League to replace the union's outgoing leader, William C. Violante, who was named deputy mayor in charge of public safety. Dave Zeigler, 48, was elected Tuesday by the union's board of directors. He pledged to continue existing policies and focus on contract negotiations. "I'm looking forward to it," Zeigler said of his new job. "There aren't going to be any major changes; everything is in place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2004 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
An East Los Angeles nonprofit organization known as a prolific low-income housing developer with political ties to high-ranking Latino lawmakers has launched an aggressive expansion into the fast-growing Inland Empire. The East Los Angeles Community Union, an economic development corporation that includes profit-making subsidiaries, already has opened three senior housing projects in San Bernardino and Riverside counties and is planning to build four more in the near future.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2003 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
Led by the Rev. Jesse Jackson and a host of political, religious and community leaders, more than 1,000 workers marched to Pershing Square in downtown Los Angeles on Wednesday for a boisterous, labor-sponsored rally -- one of dozens of actions staged across the country to promote the right to organize unions. Marchers ranged from private security guards to newspaper reporters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2000 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flush with success from the biggest union organizing drive since the 1930s, Los Angeles' labor leaders are setting ambitious political goals for the new year, including winning local, state and national electoral races, securing top-dollar contracts for unprecedented numbers of workers, and adding even more low-wage employees to their ranks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1999 | KELLY CANDAELE and PETER DREIER, Kelly Candaele, president of the Los Angeles Community College Board of Trustees, taught labor history at Los Angeles Trade-Tech College for many years. Peter Dreier is a professor of politics at Occidental College
Will historians look at the AFL-CIO's national convention, meeting in Los Angeles this week, as a turning point in the labor movement's revival or as the swan song of a political dinosaur? Most of the hoopla surrounding the meeting has centered on whether the delegates will endorse a Democratic presidential candidate or remain neutral until Vice President Al Gore and former Sen. Bill Bradley duke it out in the early primaries.
NEWS
September 6, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years into a historic push to organize the region's multiethnic work force, Los Angeles labor unions have begun to see results, adding more than 85,000 members this year alone and building a network of political and community allies that is paying off in new laws and public support. Perhaps more than anywhere in the nation, unions here have embraced the more aggressive, sophisticated approach to organizing promoted by AFL-CIO President John J. Sweeney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The protracted labor dispute at the New Otani Hotel & Garden in Los Angeles eluded resolution Monday, as the hotel's Tokyo management--in a long-awaited meeting with two of its L.A.-based employees--rejected requests to rehire three fired workers and meet directly with union officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1993
The Los Angeles Police Protective League, whose president was chosen this week to be Mayor Riordan's deputy mayor for public safety, reacted to critics of that appointment Thursday by releasing a statement pledging the union's commitment to LAPD reform. Some department critics--including the local American Civil Liberties Union's legal director, Paul Hoffman--expressed concern over Riordan's appointing union President William C. Violante to the post.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1994
The Los Angeles Police Protective League on Wednesday filed a labor grievance against the Police Department's second highest-ranking official, accusing him of engaging in a "concerted and coercive effort" to force promotions of women and minorities at the expense of qualified white male candidates. The claim, signed by league general counsel Hank Hernandez, accuses Assistant Chief Bernard C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1995
Sporting a suit and tie, Larry G. Williams stood before an attentive crowd. Homeless just five months ago, he told the story of his downward spiral, from family life to drug addiction and the streets. "I thought I was lost for the rest of my life," Williams, 45, said after his speech during the dedication this week of a $300,000 learning center at the Union Rescue Mission in Downtown Los Angeles.
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