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NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Alissa Walker
With condo buildings sprouting from vacant lots and talk of lifting height restrictions on its high-rises, Hollywood offers one of the best illustrations of Los Angeles' push toward population density. In the heart of this quickly changing neighborhood, in an appropriately tiny storefront gallery, two exhibitions show the direction of L.A. through studies of micro apartments and multifamily apartments. "How Small Is Too Small" and "By-Right/By-Design," running until Aug. 4 at the WuHo Gallery, examine a future that, the exhibits propose, is already partially here.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2009 | Richard Rayner
In the late 1960s, a tall and ungainly Englishman named Peter Reyner Banham brought his shaggy beard and wonky teeth to Los Angeles and declared that he loved the city with a passion. It helped that, as a visiting architecture professor (Banham was teaching at USC), he was given some pretty fancy digs: He stayed in Greene & Greene's Gamble house in Pasadena, one of the most beautiful and romantic houses in America. So Banham had a privileged base from which to explore.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2013 | By Celine Wright
With his hair tousled and aviator sunglasses resting on a table, Matt Bristol seemed like your typical Angeleno on a recent afternoon for lunch in Brentwood.  But Bristol is a cast member on the TLC series “Breaking Amish: Los Angeles,” which dropped him in Venice Beach, a long way - literally and figuratively - from his home in Lancaster County, Penn., where he lives as a Mennonite. “Breaking Amish: Los Angeles” premiered on July 21 to about 2 million viewers. The series is a spinoff from "Breaking Amish: New York,” which followed five young adults (four Amish, one Mennonite)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Before we begin, a moment of silence please for all the brick and mortar that made the ultimate sacrifice for "Battle: Los Angeles. " Sob. Let me just grab a tissue. Sorry. Let us not forget the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air either. The pyrotechnics are patriotic, sizable, and clearly the star of "Battle: Los Angeles," so don't let the tight shots of Aaron Eckhart's chiseled jaw and cleft chin fool you. The movie, directed by Jonathan Liebesman, is very much in the tradition of those old World War II films you find on late-night cable with rickety fighter planes engaged in long skirmishes that you can't follow all that well except you know a few good men are trying to save the day. But with less story and instead of Germans or Japanese for hostiles, we get hordes of vengeful aliens, their monstrous UFOs choking the L.A. skies like rush hour on the 405. Chris Bertolini's script is totally predictable from the first few moments when Eckhart's Marine staff sergeant signs his discharge papers only to have them put on hold.
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