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Lost And Found

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The lowbrow comedy "Lost and Found in Armenia" so shamelessly wallows in its broad humor, silly contrivances and retrograde stereotypes it almost dares you to be annoyed. Mission accomplished. A kind of pale, reverse twist on "The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming," the movie finds Bill (Jamie Kennedy), a lovelorn American vacationing in Turkey, crash-landing across the border in Armenia after, let's just say, a highly improbable parasailing fiasco. The nuttiness escalates once the hapless Bill wakes up amid a group of hostile, dim-witted villagers absurdly convinced he's a Turkish spy (the film offers a slapdash history lesson on Armenian-Turkish rancor)
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld
A bit of lost Los Angeles lives for now in a Pomona warehouse. Glimpse it and get goose bumps, even on a sticky summer day. The soft curve of the Brown Derby's hat. The dragon that danced outside Grauman's Chinese. The worn characters above a prewar beauty salon in Little Tokyo. These are the signs that used to light up this town. Plug in the oldest ones and they clickety-clack, clickety-clack, bringing to mind rumble seats and RCA Victor 78s. For more than 30 years, those behind the Museum of Neon Art have searched for signs - scouting out demolitions, digging in Dumpsters, peering into dusty old garages.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1990
A suitcase containing more than $300,000 in cash, believed to be drug money, was found near the belongings of a man who was shot four times in Studio City on Monday night, Los Angeles police said Tuesday. The victim, Tony James Holmes, 42, of Acton, denied that the money was his, police said. Officers responding to a report of shots fired in the 4200 block of Vineland Avenue found Holmes lying wounded in the courtyard of an apartment complex, said Commander William Booth. Holmes was taken to St.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2013 | David Lazarus
Katherine Gould recently enjoyed a thrilling ride on Magic Mountain's fast-zooming, forward-and-backward-rotating, face-down-plunging X2 roller coaster. Then she underwent a frustrating experience trying to recover from Magic Mountain's lost-and-found department the smartphone that had gone flying from her pocket at some point during all that zooming, rotating and plunging. "I honestly didn't think I'd get my phone back," Gould, 45, told me. "But I did expect at least an attempt at customer service.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A valuable Renoir stolen from Sweden's National Museum in December was found during an unrelated drug bust. Police found Renoir's "Conversation" in a bag as they were detaining three drug suspects. "It wasn't expected that they should have the painting; it just happened," police said. Another Renoir and a Rembrandt are still missing.
OPINION
December 25, 2011 | By Nina Burleigh
I had traveled a lot in the Middle East, but never before to Beirut, the "Paris of the Orient. " I went just before Christmas last year, to interview a famous, beautiful woman, and I had a half-day to see the sights. Out on the Corniche, beyond the ruined art deco beachfront high-rises — lodging rats now, not VIPs — you can rent a bike. No one seemed to have a map, but the mid-December sun was warm and it seemed a shame not to pedal along the seashore on my free afternoon. Seeking the bike shop, I encountered two boys on a bench by the sea. One was smoking, holding his cigarette between flesh stumps where his hands had been cut or burned off at the wrists.
MAGAZINE
August 24, 1986
No one likes to dwell on the idea that his or her pet might disappear, but there is no harm in being prepared. A good addition to your animal library is a 24-page instruction manual titled "Pet Recovery Kit," written by Michael and Michelle Trunko. It tells you, step-by-step, what to do if you discover that your pet is missing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2009 | Geoff Boucher
It's one thing to be drenched in dinosaur urine or chased across the desert by a giant, clawed carnivore, but the true test of the modern action-comedy star is whether he can play through pain -- the unscripted variety. That was clear while watching Will Ferrell limp across the sun-scorched set of "Land of the Lost" on a badly sprained ankle. "It's the hazards with this kind of terrain," the grimacing star said during one of the harsher days on the set of the film that opens June 5.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Sarah Weinman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The comeback: Publishing as a whole is affected by this particular scourge, but genre fiction in particular suffers from this plight in the most obvious way. It's when a writer appears, sometimes with considerable fanfare, with a new series, garnering an audience with each successive volume. The problem is, if the audience isn't big enough, or the money paid out to said writer doesn't produce expected sales, the publisher may cancel the series after just two or three books (or, in truly worst-case scenarios, after just one)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The lowbrow comedy "Lost and Found in Armenia" so shamelessly wallows in its broad humor, silly contrivances and retrograde stereotypes it almost dares you to be annoyed. Mission accomplished. A kind of pale, reverse twist on "The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming," the movie finds Bill (Jamie Kennedy), a lovelorn American vacationing in Turkey, crash-landing across the border in Armenia after, let's just say, a highly improbable parasailing fiasco. The nuttiness escalates once the hapless Bill wakes up amid a group of hostile, dim-witted villagers absurdly convinced he's a Turkish spy (the film offers a slapdash history lesson on Armenian-Turkish rancor)
WORLD
March 2, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
ALLAHABAD, India - Saraswati Devi shivers in the dirt near a small fire, tears streaming down her face, her tattered sari wrapped tightly around her small frame. The 73-year-old farmer from a small village in the central state of Madhya Pradesh had arrived earlier in the day with her younger sister-in-law at the Kumbh Mela, a massive Hindu religious festival on the edge of the sacred Ganges River. But in the crush of the crowd, which is expected to number about 100 million this year, they had become separated.
WORLD
January 18, 2013 | By Alexandra Sandels and Maher Abukhater, Los Angeles Times
RAMTHA, Jordan - As a child and young adult, the woman now known as Umm Riaan kept the worn photo carefully tucked away. Maybe the fading snapshot of her as a newborn, cradled in her mother's arms, would help unravel her life's central mystery: What had become of her mother? She never quite believed her father's account, that her mother was a "bad" person, had abandoned the family in Syria when Umm Riaan was an infant and later died in a car crash. Umm Riaan had no memory of her mother, but her resolve to find her deepened last spring as clashes raged outside her home in a suburb of Damascus, the Syrian capital, and she faced a defining personal moment: At 22, she was pregnant with her first child.
NATIONAL
October 17, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
TUCSON - She probably never imagined things would go so wrong - that she'd end up here, on a scuffed metal gurney in a coroner's office far from home. Still, at age 22, she was old enough to know the dangers of stealing across the U.S. border from Mexico onto a lethal desert landscape, where she would have to take crazy chances amid the heat, cold and rattlesnakes to avoid capture by la migra , the U.S. Border Patrol. Her body was found in early 2009 near a service road, a two-day walk from the border.
NATIONAL
October 17, 2012 | By Tina Susman
A painting by American artist Roy Lichtenstein of a large electric cord, valued at some $4 million, is back with its rightful owner 42 years after it vanished while in the hands of an art restorer. Officials from the FBI and the U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan handed the work over to a smiling Barbara Bertozzi Castelli on Tuesday, ending a mystery that began in 1970 when Castelli's late husband, art dealer Leo Castelli, sent the painting out for cleaning. Castelli had acquired the painting in the 1960s for about $750 and had displayed it at his New York City gallery.
SPORTS
October 1, 2012 | Sam Farmer
Who says Tom Brady isn't a great scrambler? The Patriots quarterback was scrambling all over the New England sideline Sunday in Buffalo, frantically searching for his missing helmet before his team's first possession of the third quarter. He couldn't just grab a teammate's helmet, because his is outfitted with a coach-to-quarterback earpiece. Brady finally found what he was looking for, and so did his team. The Patriots erased a 14-point second-half deficit by scoring touchdowns on six consecutive second-half drives on the way to a 52-28 blowout.
HOME & GARDEN
March 10, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
It was on a smoking patio in Echo Park that an older woman named Annie shattered my illusions about finding a suitable boyfriend in my 30s. "Tell them, 'If you don't have jack, don't call back,'" she said, while I fiddled guiltily with an American Spirit (I had "quit" two weeks earlier). I nodded, thinking I understood. "J.A.C.," she said again, holding up three fingers. "Job, apartment or car. " Had it come to this? Was my baseline for dating in Los Angeles really a guy's possession of J.A.C.?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2012 | By Chris Barton, Los Angeles Times
Though this year's Grammy nominations in jazz are without any Earth-rippling surprises à la last year's new-artist breakthrough by Esperanza Spalding, L.A.-born singer-songwriter Gretchen Parlato could've been considered a solid bet to follow in her footsteps if ours was the sort of world where lightning could strike twice. Though Parlato's 2011 album, "The Lost and Found," was overlooked by the Recording Academy, it was a fixture on many best-of lists at the end of the year, including Rhapsody's inaugural Jazz Critics' Poll (formerly hosted at the Village Voice)
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