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Lotta Crabtree

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1998 | TRUDY TYNAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
She was the "Golden Girl" of California's Gold Rush, "La Petite Lotta," possessor of "the most beautiful ankle in the world" when a glimpse was still shocking. Nearly 150 years later, the gold the 49ers tossed onstage when Lotta Crabtree danced is still staking young farmers to a start in the rocky soil of New England. The little girl with strawberry-blond curls, singing so sweetly in such mining camps as "You Bet" and "Port Wine," grew into the most glamorous stage star of her time.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2005 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Between them they were bigger than Britney Spears and more daring than Janet Jackson. They were as much a part of 19th century California history as gold and guns. Though they are largely forgotten today, one woman is devoted to keeping their memory alive -- well, at least the memory of one of them. Lotta Crabtree and Lola Montez, protegee and teacher, became rivals for the informal title of "San Francisco's Favorite" in Gold Rush California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2005 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Between them they were bigger than Britney Spears and more daring than Janet Jackson. They were as much a part of 19th century California history as gold and guns. Though they are largely forgotten today, one woman is devoted to keeping their memory alive -- well, at least the memory of one of them. Lotta Crabtree and Lola Montez, protegee and teacher, became rivals for the informal title of "San Francisco's Favorite" in Gold Rush California.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2000 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The first time that actor Roberto Garza affixed a beard to his chin and adopted the swagger of Pio Pico, the last Mexican governor of California, it was just another acting job. He didn't know anything of Pico's history--that he was born a Spaniard at the San Gabriel Mission on Cinco de Mayo in 1801, that he became rich as a Mexican businessman during the Gold Rush or that he died a poor American at age 94.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2000 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The first time that actor Roberto Garza affixed a beard to his chin and adopted the swagger of Pio Pico, the last Mexican governor of California, it was just another acting job. He didn't know anything of Pico's history--that he was born a Spaniard at the San Gabriel Mission on Cinco de Mayo in 1801, that he became rich as a Mexican businessman during the Gold Rush or that he died a poor American at age 94.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2008 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
Max Ophuls' 1955 "Lola Montes" was a box office flop, butchered by its producers, then restored as much as possible by producer Pierre Braunberger in 1968. And, now, 40 years later, his daughter Laurence has overseen a superb state-of-the-art restoration. Ophuls' last film and first in color is the most baroque of his sumptuous period pictures -- and to many critics, his greatest.
NEWS
August 30, 1987 | Zan Thompson
The Maroon Bells are three matching mountains at the 10,000-foot elevation--about four miles up the hill from Aspen Highlands in Colorado. Above the timberline, they are a softened red, the color of corundum or burnt sienna. As evening climbs the mountains, they are back-lit by the sinking sun, as if there were a spot stage left, lighting the folds and crevices. My friend from Houston, Jean Erck, and I took our sundown drinks to a spot at the foot of the Maroon Bells and listened to the silence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1998 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Judith Helton performs her one-woman show based on the life of Laura Ingalls Wilder, who wrote the beloved children's book "The Little House on the Prairie," her aim is to take kids into the past. Saturday afternoon at Glendale Central Library, kids may join her on a trip to the Great Plains of America 100 years ago--when folks lived in homes dug into wilderness riverbanks and worried that oxen would wander onto the roof and crash into the sitting room.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | Zan Thompson
The great, billowing Romanesque pile that is the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County still sits like Queen Victoria, parceling out creme mints after tea to very good boys and girls. The museum is always worth an afternoon, even if there were nothing to look at but the dinosaur skeletons. Then most of the time, they have a special exhibit, too, which makes a trip a delightful afternoon. Right now and until May 17, they have one of the largest collections of gold ever assembled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1986 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Alfred Mirande remembers the day as if it were yesterday--and at 100 years old, he has enjoyed a lot of yesterdays. "Hoo-boy, the earthquake," he said Friday, his sluggish voice belying a sharp memory. "That sure woke us up, all right. It shook us up pretty bad." Jack Downey, who was only four months old at the time, has murkier memories of that day 80 years ago Friday when a devastating earthquake knocked this city on it backside and sparked 52 separate fires to burn over what remained.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1998 | TRUDY TYNAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
She was the "Golden Girl" of California's Gold Rush, "La Petite Lotta," possessor of "the most beautiful ankle in the world" when a glimpse was still shocking. Nearly 150 years later, the gold the 49ers tossed onstage when Lotta Crabtree danced is still staking young farmers to a start in the rocky soil of New England. The little girl with strawberry-blond curls, singing so sweetly in such mining camps as "You Bet" and "Port Wine," grew into the most glamorous stage star of her time.
NEWS
July 3, 1988 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
A red, white and blue atmosphere, protocol-free, prevails Monday for Les Dames de Champagne (International Hostesses) and the Young Californians "Happy Birthday U.S.A." party at the William Ahmanson Calabasas Ranch. It's the groups' seventh annual salute to the Southern California consular corps families. The rolling hills and ancient oaks (just an echo away from the Ventura Freeway) provide the setting.
TRAVEL
November 8, 1987 | MICHELE GRIMM and TOM GRIMM, The Grimms of Laguna Beach are authors of "Away for the Weekend," a travel guide to Southern California.
Forget about your Big Macs and Whoppers in Grass Valley. Nothing pleases folks here more than a Cornish pastie. That's because the meat pies have been a traditional meal here since the 1850s, when miners left Cornwall, England, to work the hard-rock gold claims in California's Mother Lode. At one time the population of Grass Valley was reported to be 85% Cornish, and their descendants are still around.
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