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Lotteries England

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NEWS
January 7, 1996 | From Times Wires Services
A record lottery jackpot of $65.3 million inspired a betting frenzy Saturday by an estimated 90% of British adults that briefly shut down lottery ticket machines. Cher drew the winning numbers live on television Saturday night. But the lottery's operator, Camelot Group, said the huge number of contestants--more than 100 million--meant winners will not be identified at least until today.
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NEWS
November 14, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Something has finally gone right for Conservative Party leader William Hague: His aunt has scooped the jackpot in Britain's National Lottery. The organizers of the game said Marjorie Longdin, 73, from near Doncaster in south Yorkshire was one of four people who each won $1.43 million. Hague, struggling to revive the Conservatives' political fortunes, said he was delighted for his aunt but did not expect her to help bail out the debt-ridden party with her newfound wealth.
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NEWS
November 14, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Something has finally gone right for Conservative Party leader William Hague: His aunt has scooped the jackpot in Britain's National Lottery. The organizers of the game said Marjorie Longdin, 73, from near Doncaster in south Yorkshire was one of four people who each won $1.43 million. Hague, struggling to revive the Conservatives' political fortunes, said he was delighted for his aunt but did not expect her to help bail out the debt-ridden party with her newfound wealth.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | From Times Wires Services
A record lottery jackpot of $65.3 million inspired a betting frenzy Saturday by an estimated 90% of British adults that briefly shut down lottery ticket machines. Cher drew the winning numbers live on television Saturday night. But the lottery's operator, Camelot Group, said the huge number of contestants--more than 100 million--meant winners will not be identified at least until today.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As its popularity far outpaces expectations, Britain's new National Lottery is proving to be an unexpected bonanza for everyone entitled to a share of its earnings. But the vast funds suddenly available for "good causes" have provoked disputes involving the many organizations designated to receive the windfall benefits.
NEWS
August 30, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For generations, Britain's national pastime has been neither cricket nor soccer--but gambling. Gamblers of all stripes have found the country a Mecca, with dozens of racecourses and dog tracks, thousands of bingo parlors and hundreds of thousands of slot machines. Legalized casinos, card clubs and bookmakers have long been a feature of the British scene. Almost every pub in the land has a slot machine--called a fruit machine after the apples, lemons and oranges on the dials.
NEWS
November 22, 1994 | Reuters
Queen Elizabeth II was among the winners in the first draw of Britain's new national lottery, Today newspaper reported in its Monday editions. Britain's richest woman won 10 pounds ($15.70), but she will have to share it with the other members of a 20-member royal syndicate including her husband, Prince Philip, and the Queen Mother, it said. They will each get 50 pence (80 cents). The royal punters were among 1.
NEWS
November 19, 1994 | Reuters
So many hope to beat the 14 million-to-1 odds against winning Britain's first lottery draw today that the pot has brimmed beyond expectations to nearly $11 million. Betting experts say the likelihood of winning the jackpot is about as good as Elvis Presley landing a UFO on top of the Loch Ness Monster. Camelot, the operator of the first British lottery since 1826, said Friday that the response had been phenomenal, and hundreds of thousands of people will be richer by this weekend.
NEWS
August 30, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For generations, Britain's national pastime has been neither cricket nor soccer--but gambling. Gamblers of all stripes have found the country a Mecca, with dozens of racecourses and dog tracks, thousands of bingo parlors and hundreds of thousands of slot machines. Legalized casinos, card clubs and bookmakers have long been a feature of the British scene. Almost every pub in the land has a slot machine--called a fruit machine after the apples, lemons and oranges on the dials.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As its popularity far outpaces expectations, Britain's new National Lottery is proving to be an unexpected bonanza for everyone entitled to a share of its earnings. But the vast funds suddenly available for "good causes" have provoked disputes involving the many organizations designated to receive the windfall benefits.
NEWS
November 22, 1994 | Reuters
Queen Elizabeth II was among the winners in the first draw of Britain's new national lottery, Today newspaper reported in its Monday editions. Britain's richest woman won 10 pounds ($15.70), but she will have to share it with the other members of a 20-member royal syndicate including her husband, Prince Philip, and the Queen Mother, it said. They will each get 50 pence (80 cents). The royal punters were among 1.
NEWS
November 19, 1994 | Reuters
So many hope to beat the 14 million-to-1 odds against winning Britain's first lottery draw today that the pot has brimmed beyond expectations to nearly $11 million. Betting experts say the likelihood of winning the jackpot is about as good as Elvis Presley landing a UFO on top of the Loch Ness Monster. Camelot, the operator of the first British lottery since 1826, said Friday that the response had been phenomenal, and hundreds of thousands of people will be richer by this weekend.
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