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NEWS
December 13, 1990 | Associated Press
The state Lottery Commission, which once had excess money for operations, cut 50 jobs Wednesday as part of a $59-million, 15%-budget cut this fiscal year to offset sluggish game sales. The policy-setting board voted 4 to 0 to approve the latest round of nearly $19 million in reductions, effective Jan. 1, including elimination of 50 vacant positions. None of the agency's 1,100 workers will be fired but a freeze will continue on the hiring of replacements for departing workers.
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NEWS
July 26, 1994 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One week after an auditor's report found that the lottery stifled competition for a $600-million computer contract, two Georgia companies formally demanded Monday that the state cancel its contract with the winning bidder. Automated Wagering International argued that the lottery's contract with GTECH Corp. of Rhode Island to install and run a central computer system to take bets was invalid, contending that the transaction last year violated California law by squeezing out competing bidders.
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NEWS
March 18, 1992 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the introduction of an array of games designed to bring players back, sales of California Lottery tickets have remained flat and forced officials to cut another $5 million from the administrative payroll. "The situation is very, very difficult," Lottery Director Sharon Sharp said Tuesday. "It's crazy. We're bringing out new products and we have almost no money to advertise them."
NEWS
March 18, 1992 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the introduction of an array of games designed to bring players back, sales of California Lottery tickets have remained flat and forced officials to cut another $5 million from the administrative payroll. "The situation is very, very difficult," Lottery Director Sharon Sharp said Tuesday. "It's crazy. We're bringing out new products and we have almost no money to advertise them."
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dwindling player interest in California's games of chance and a faltering economy have caused a dramatic 14% plunge in state lottery sales this year that is producing the lowest return for education since 1987. With sales of all games except Lotto well below projections, the California Lottery ended the fiscal year June 30 with revenues of $2.133 billion as compared to $2.479 billion last year. No other state experienced as large a percentage drop in sales.
NEWS
December 8, 1990 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The failure of a new Lotto game to produce a record-breaking jackpot combined with a softening economy has caused a sales slump at the California Lottery that officials predicted Friday could reduce the game's contribution to education next year by as much as $280 million. Officials said the lower than expected sales already have forced them to cut $59 million from their administrative budget by severely reducing advertising, declaring a hiring freeze and postponing equipment purchases.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With fewer and fewer players taking a chance on California's lottery, state officials are proposing to eliminate dozens of middle-management jobs and reduce the agency's promotions budget to avert a financial crisis. But Gov. Pete Wilson said Thursday that all major decisions at the lottery should remain on hold for the time being.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The state lottery said it may recover more than $780,000 lost in developing a lotto game that was killed by a legal dispute which erupted shortly before the game began. Lottery spokeswoman Joanne McNabb said it was inaccurate that the game, Pronto, "cost untold millions" when officials continued development "despite repeated warnings that the game was illegal," as reported by the Sacramento Union. Managing editor Ken Harvey said the newspaper "stands by the story as it was printed."
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Lottery holds its first drawing today in a new game of chance that officials hope will help reverse a prolonged decline in ticket sales and renew player interest in the state's lottery games. Officials have launched Fantasy Five, a scaled-down version of Lotto, which offers smaller prizes but better odds than previous games. It made its official debut Saturday as the second installment in a new lineup that is the core of Director Sharon Sharp's strategy to revitalize the lottery.
NEWS
July 26, 1994 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One week after an auditor's report found that the lottery stifled competition for a $600-million computer contract, two Georgia companies formally demanded Monday that the state cancel its contract with the winning bidder. Automated Wagering International argued that the lottery's contract with GTECH Corp. of Rhode Island to install and run a central computer system to take bets was invalid, contending that the transaction last year violated California law by squeezing out competing bidders.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Lottery holds its first drawing today in a new game of chance that officials hope will help reverse a prolonged decline in ticket sales and renew player interest in the state's lottery games. Officials have launched Fantasy Five, a scaled-down version of Lotto, which offers smaller prizes but better odds than previous games. It made its official debut Saturday as the second installment in a new lineup that is the core of Director Sharon Sharp's strategy to revitalize the lottery.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With fewer and fewer players taking a chance on California's lottery, state officials are proposing to eliminate dozens of middle-management jobs and reduce the agency's promotions budget to avert a financial crisis. But Gov. Pete Wilson said Thursday that all major decisions at the lottery should remain on hold for the time being.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dwindling player interest in California's games of chance and a faltering economy have caused a dramatic 14% plunge in state lottery sales this year that is producing the lowest return for education since 1987. With sales of all games except Lotto well below projections, the California Lottery ended the fiscal year June 30 with revenues of $2.133 billion as compared to $2.479 billion last year. No other state experienced as large a percentage drop in sales.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | Associated Press
The state Lottery Commission, which once had excess money for operations, cut 50 jobs Wednesday as part of a $59-million, 15%-budget cut this fiscal year to offset sluggish game sales. The policy-setting board voted 4 to 0 to approve the latest round of nearly $19 million in reductions, effective Jan. 1, including elimination of 50 vacant positions. None of the agency's 1,100 workers will be fired but a freeze will continue on the hiring of replacements for departing workers.
NEWS
December 8, 1990 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The failure of a new Lotto game to produce a record-breaking jackpot combined with a softening economy has caused a sales slump at the California Lottery that officials predicted Friday could reduce the game's contribution to education next year by as much as $280 million. Officials said the lower than expected sales already have forced them to cut $59 million from their administrative budget by severely reducing advertising, declaring a hiring freeze and postponing equipment purchases.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The state lottery said it may recover more than $780,000 lost in developing a lotto game that was killed by a legal dispute which erupted shortly before the game began. Lottery spokeswoman Joanne McNabb said it was inaccurate that the game, Pronto, "cost untold millions" when officials continued development "despite repeated warnings that the game was illegal," as reported by the Sacramento Union. Managing editor Ken Harvey said the newspaper "stands by the story as it was printed."
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