Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLotteries Russia
IN THE NEWS

Lotteries Russia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few weeks ago, she was an unemployed factory worker scraping by with her equally jobless husband and two sons in a three-room apartment in the rump end of the Russian federation. Today, she might well be the wealthiest woman in all of the republic of Bashkortostan. And, unlike many seriously rich "new Russians" nowadays, Nadezhda Mukhametzyanov can say she came by her money honestly.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few weeks ago, she was an unemployed factory worker scraping by with her equally jobless husband and two sons in a three-room apartment in the rump end of the Russian federation. Today, she might well be the wealthiest woman in all of the republic of Bashkortostan. And, unlike many seriously rich "new Russians" nowadays, Nadezhda Mukhametzyanov can say she came by her money honestly.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 23, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His fur hat was moth-eaten and his trouser cuffs were ratty, but Sergei Arukonovich figured the 10-ruble note in his pocket wasn't worth saving. It wouldn't even buy a pair of shoelaces. So he spent it on hope instead. Hunched over against the blustery wind, Arukonovich, a grizzled, 70-year-old retiree, traded his faded red bank note for a crisp lottery ticket and the chance to win a jackpot of several million rubles.
NEWS
November 23, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His fur hat was moth-eaten and his trouser cuffs were ratty, but Sergei Arukonovich figured the 10-ruble note in his pocket wasn't worth saving. It wouldn't even buy a pair of shoelaces. So he spent it on hope instead. Hunched over against the blustery wind, Arukonovich, a grizzled, 70-year-old retiree, traded his faded red bank note for a crisp lottery ticket and the chance to win a jackpot of several million rubles.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|