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Lou Dantzler

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2006 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Lou Dantzler did not learn the importance of filling the empty places in a kid's life from reading a book. That was a lesson Dantzler learned as a young child, growing up on a farm in South Carolina without a father and with a future that held few prospects, aside from toiling in cotton fields.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2006 | Jean Merl, Times Staff Writer
In a spirited service punctuated by nearly as much laughter as tears, hundreds of people packed the gymnasium of the Challengers Boys & Girls Club in South Los Angeles on Saturday to pay last respects to the club's beloved founder. Lou Dantzler, who started the club with 12 boys in 1968 and nurtured it into a nationally acclaimed organization that has served nearly 35,000 youths, died July 6 of complications from a stroke.
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NEWS
December 14, 1990 | PAUL MANNING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three years ago, when Inaliel Lisbey was in the third grade, he was in constant trouble for fighting and vandalizing at his South-Central Los Angeles elementary school. Then he stopped going to class altogether. "He was leaving the school with gang members as soon as I dropped him off," said his mother, Leilani Pettiford, a single parent with three other young children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2006 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Lou Dantzler did not learn the importance of filling the empty places in a kid's life from reading a book. That was a lesson Dantzler learned as a young child, growing up on a farm in South Carolina without a father and with a future that held few prospects, aside from toiling in cotton fields.
NEWS
March 30, 1999 | SANDY BANKS
There was no master plan, no grand design that served as Lou Dantzler's guide. He was simply a school custodian with a new pickup truck and a dozen neighborhood kids clamoring for a ride. "So I loaded them up in the back of my truck and took them over to Centinela Park in Inglewood. And we played ball." That day's game led to another, and Dantzler wound up spending most every Saturday at the park, hiking and playing ball with "his" kids, most of them young boys without fathers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2006 | Jean Merl, Times Staff Writer
In a spirited service punctuated by nearly as much laughter as tears, hundreds of people packed the gymnasium of the Challengers Boys & Girls Club in South Los Angeles on Saturday to pay last respects to the club's beloved founder. Lou Dantzler, who started the club with 12 boys in 1968 and nurtured it into a nationally acclaimed organization that has served nearly 35,000 youths, died July 6 of complications from a stroke.
SPORTS
September 11, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A week of activities to celebrate Los Angeles' African-American sports history, entitled "Seven Days of Glory," begins Sunday and culminates next Saturday with the second group to be inducted into the Black Sports Hall of Fame. Those who will be honored in ceremonies Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1985
Mayor Tom Bradley announced Tuesday that a total of $75,000 in private funds has been donated to a southwest Los Angeles elementary school for a gang prevention program that may be expanded citywide. The money will be used by Challengers Boys and Girls Club to operate an after-school program of tutoring, arts and crafts and sports at Cienega Elementary School near Adams and LaBrea boulevards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2006 | Steve Lopez
I'm not going to mess up Father's Day for Lou Dantzler by talking about the odds against his kids or the war outside his door at 51st and Vermont in South Los Angeles. He knows what's out there as well as anyone. But why talk about it, Dantzler says, instead of doing something about it? Way back in the 1960s, he did. The son of a South Carolina sharecropper, Dantzler settled in Los Angeles after a tour in the Air Force, married a local beauty named Ruby, and raised 30,000 children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1992 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A commission set up by President Bush to study the decline of the American family sparred with members of the Hollywood community Thursday over the country's most controversial single mom--fictional television anchor Murphy Brown. Commission member Alphonso Jackson, who heads the Housing Authority in Dallas, set off a fierce exchange when he accused the television networks of setting a double standard.
NEWS
March 30, 1999 | SANDY BANKS
There was no master plan, no grand design that served as Lou Dantzler's guide. He was simply a school custodian with a new pickup truck and a dozen neighborhood kids clamoring for a ride. "So I loaded them up in the back of my truck and took them over to Centinela Park in Inglewood. And we played ball." That day's game led to another, and Dantzler wound up spending most every Saturday at the park, hiking and playing ball with "his" kids, most of them young boys without fathers.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | PAUL MANNING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three years ago, when Inaliel Lisbey was in the third grade, he was in constant trouble for fighting and vandalizing at his South-Central Los Angeles elementary school. Then he stopped going to class altogether. "He was leaving the school with gang members as soon as I dropped him off," said his mother, Leilani Pettiford, a single parent with three other young children.
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | ELSTON CARR
At the East 60th Street Community Youth Center, Kenny Jones has created a safe place for children and teen-agers to have fun. Jones, 49, transformed a gang hangout to one of the only community meeting places for area youth. And this year the center received an award for excellence in community service from the city. "When I came here, people who lived in the immediate community would not allow their kids to come here," said Jones, who began volunteering at the center in 1985.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2007 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
The Inner City Education Foundation announced Thursday that it had received more than $4 million in grants and would open four new charter schools in South Los Angeles this fall. With the new middle and high schools, the Inner City group will have nine charter campuses operating within the Los Angeles Unified School District. When full enrollment is reached, the nine schools will serve 4,000 K-12 students; the group's five existing charter schools have waiting lists that exceed 5,000 students.
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