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Lou Papan

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NEWS
June 21, 1998 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-four years after Californians approved the nation's toughest political reform law, an unlikely pair of allies are gearing up to give the Watergate-era initiative a tune-up. They want to make the law friendlier for state and local politicians, chiefly by allowing the minimum levels of campaign contributions, personal wealth and gifts to at least double in size before they must be made public.
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NEWS
June 21, 1998 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-four years after Californians approved the nation's toughest political reform law, an unlikely pair of allies are gearing up to give the Watergate-era initiative a tune-up. They want to make the law friendlier for state and local politicians, chiefly by allowing the minimum levels of campaign contributions, personal wealth and gifts to at least double in size before they must be made public.
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BUSINESS
April 29, 1998 | Capitol Alert News Service
An Assembly committee approved legislation to grant users of debit cards protections similar to those enjoyed by credit cardholders. AB 1638 by Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa (D-Los Angeles) and Assemblywoman Valerie Brown (D-Kenwood) had failed in a legislative committee last week when Assembly Banking Committee Chairman Lou Papan (D-Millbrae) inadvertently closed the vote before fellow lawmaker Kerry Mazzoni (D-San Rafael) could register her support.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1999
Re "Limiting Term Limits," editorial, June 21: No. No. No. You still don't get it. Those of us who voted for term limits don't feel that members of the Legislature now "are forced to plot their next move, often a run for the state Senate or other office." We don't want them spending time seeking money for future political spots so that they can "serve for decades, relishing the trappings and benefits of power." Those folks were elected to represent us for a specific time (and probably a specific reason)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2000
Re "Bill to Erase Robbins' Name OKd," Aug. 8, Assemblyman Lou Papan (D-Millbrae) should get with the times. Revisionist historians went out with the old Soviet Union. It's true that former state Sen. Alan Robbins "did the crime and served the time," but he also authored significant legislation that bears his name. Papan should drop his efforts to strip Robbins' name from those laws. Robbins is yesterday's news. Of concern today are the countless politicians (of both political parties)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2000
Who does Assemblyman Lou Papan (D-Millbrae) think he is, trying to wipe former state Sen. Alan Robbins' name off the bills he sponsored, including the landmark Robbins Rape Evidence Law, which became a national model (June 26-27)? Robbins went to prison for his misdeeds, while most politicians get away with theirs. His name will be forgotten in 50 years, but his legislation will continue to help rape victims. For Papan's information, the California Legislature has a far worse reputation now than when Robbins was in it. This Legislature refuses to lower the highest state income tax in America despite huge tax surpluses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2000
Thanks to Kenneth Reich (Aug. 17) we see that a cowardly committee in the Legislature shot down two pro-consumer bills, whose need had been more than adequately described in The Times. The Banking and Finance Committee headed by Lou Papan killed both of them. The first, by Sen. Don Perata, would have put some controls on the now legal loan-sharking "payday" industry. It did not even get a second. The second bill, by Sen. Debra Bowen, would have offered some protection against identity theft.
OPINION
March 15, 1998
Speed kills! The use of radar by the California Highway Patrol to catch speeding trucks (March 1) is long overdue. In 1986 our 27-year-old son was killed by a speeding, out-of-control tractor-trailer. In 1987 state Sen. Daniel Boatwright (D-Concord) introduced a pilot program (SB 756) to crack down on speeding trucks and buses. The bill passed the Senate and was defeated in the Assembly Ways and Means Committee. The California Trucking Assn. supported radar legislation; the Teamsters opposed it. According to the CHP, speed is the primary collision factor in accidents where truck drivers are at fault.
NEWS
August 8, 2000 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assemblyman Lou Papan, known for his pit bull-style tenacity, brought back from the dead Monday a bill to erase the name of former state Sen. Alan Robbins from every law "tombstoned" in his memory. Without discussion or debate, the Senate Rules Committee reversed course and sent the unusual bill by Papan to the full Senate, where approval is expected.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS, Robin Fields covers consumer issues for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7810 and at robin.fields@latimes.com
A local controversy may prevent a head-on collision between two opposing legislative proposals for regulating public auto auctions in the state. Auctions are a popular alternative to traditional lots for buying used cars, but California regulators have criticized them, citing hundreds of complaints from buyers about defective vehicles, missing titles and oversized fees. This spring, state Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2002 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After months of negotiations following the Sept. 11 attacks, the California Legislature on Tuesday sent Gov. Gray Davis a measure that would allow undocumented immigrants to obtain state driver's licenses. Davis, speaking to reporters in San Francisco, indicated that he expects to sign the bill, in part because he believes separate legislation will address security implications raised by making licenses easier to obtain.
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