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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1989
Sure, the writing on shows such as "Growing Pains" and "Who's the Boss?" hovers between mediocre and insufficient ("Tales of Two Sitcoms," Feb. 26). But if I had kids, I wouldn't mind them spending one hour per week with a couple of "loud, dumb relatives" if it meant lessons in societal values and human decency. JOE DUNGAN Van Nuys
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
If the clang and clutter of summer superhero movies and action behemoths aren't for you - or even if you just want a break - there are still plenty of options in the months ahead, both at the art house and the far corners of the multiplex. Which isn't to say that even these movies don't have some of the same features as their louder, bigger cousins. There's the end credits stinger of "Calvary," which instead of teasing a sequel hauntingly shows the locations from the movie without people, or the microbudget action sequence of "Happy Christmas," when a frozen pizza forgotten in the oven sets off smoke alarms and panic.
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OPINION
December 16, 2009
Television viewers are a notoriously dissatisfied bunch, complaining often about lousy programming, foul language, superficiality and assorted other irritations. Although most of these shortcomings are matters of individual taste, on one point viewers are unified: TV commercials are too loud. That complaint has been voiced almost since the dawn of advertiser-supported TV, yet neither broadcasters nor advertisers have put a stop to the volume surges. On Tuesday, the House approved a bill to turn down the advertisers' volume.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Depending on your viewpoint, the horror film "The Quiet Ones" is either about a 1970s band of fearless experimenters (led by Jared Harris) who come face to face with paranormal evil, or about a mentally ill foster child (Olivia Cooke) held in captivity by cruel, smirking researchers in the English countryside. Mostly, though, it's a junky, unscary genre piece with a misleading title, because director and co-writer John Pogue jacks up the decibels so often to manufacture frights that you fear a punctured eardrum more than anything else.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1990
This is about courtesy and the people who are up at the crack of dawn every day, weekends and holidays included. They put on their quiet walking shoes that wouldn't wake a soul, and then they proceed to carry on loud conversations all over the neighborhood as they walk. If the conversation doesn't awaken you, the chain reaction of barking dogs does. I respect the walkers' quests for good health, and they should respect mine. That means letting me get a good night's sleep. JO HICKS, Santa Ana
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2009 | Steve Appleford
There's a moment in the documentary "It Might Get Loud" when Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page, while sitting with fellow guitarists Jack White and the Edge, reaches for his Gibson Les Paul to play a thundering "Whole Lotta Love." The solid-body guitar remains the model of choice for Page and many of rock's leading players, and is the enduring legacy of the late guitarist and inventor Les Paul. "It was like a throwdown," director Davis Guggenheim said of that moment in his film. "It was like, 'I'm done talking.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989
Lawrence Christon's article "Kim, the Savant Who Came to Hollywood," Jan. 8), while showing great knowledge of and sensitivity toward autistic people, also shows great ignorance about and insensitivity toward toastmasters. Toastmasters are members of the international, nonprofit Toastmasters International. The steps of our program include getting over nervousness, speaking with sincerity, varying one's voice, using body language, organizing thoughts, working with words, persuading people, speaking with credibility and inspiring people.
MAGAZINE
January 9, 2000
Thanks for allowing Heather King to share her appalling ignorance and racism with the Los Angeles Times' readership ("Of Pizzas and Peacemaking," Nov. 28). Perhaps King does not have enough experience with children in general to know that all children are loud. They laugh and they play. If the children had not been Korean would she have so ignorantly asked them if they ate dogs? Would she like it if the children asked if she came from an "inbreeding hillbilly" family? I doubt it. Amy Yang Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Band: The Buck Pets. Personnel: Andy Thompson, vocals and guitar; Chris Savage, lead guitar; Ian Beach, bass; Tony Alba, drums. History: Dallas high school pals Alba, Savage and Thompson started the Buck Pets in 1985 in classic American rock fashion: jamming in a bedroom at Alba's house. The trio went public that New Year's Eve at a Dallas club and eventually went around the country in a van on a catch-as-catch-can tour that gave the group a reputation for loud and loose shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
When it's nearing midnight and some amazing maniac is shredding through a guitar solo on stage, eyes closed, sweat flying, vibrations rumbling through the house like a northbound freight train, it's easy to forget just how much art and craft and science is involved in creating that sound. Director Davis Guggenheim, who brought us Al Gore's "An Inconvenient Truth," reminds us of this in his very fine documentary about the electric guitar and the men who play it best, "It Might Get Loud."
SPORTS
April 23, 2014 | By Broderick Turner
During the regular season, the Clippers haven't had much success against the Golden State Warriors in Oakland, having lost their last five consecutive games at Oracle Arena. Now the Clippers will be back in Oakland on Thursday for Game 3 of the Western Conference first-round playoff series knowing they need to win at least one of the two games there -- Game 4 is Sunday -- to get home-court advantage back. The best-of-seven series is tied at 1-1. “It's going to be exciting,” the Clippers' Blake Griffin said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | by Greg Braxton
Fred Armisen hasn't been on "Saturday Night Live" for quite a while, but he seems to be everywhere else. He's just started the fourth season of the quirky IFC sketch comedy show "Portlandia," which features him and Carrie Brownstein poking subtle fun at the people and rituals of Portland, Ore. He's taken on a major gig as a bandleader, with his 8G Band, for NBC's "Late Night with Seth Meyers," and he's making the rounds at other events. He was even a presenter at last week's Independent Spirit Awards.
WORLD
March 4, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
PRETORIA, South Africa -- A neighbor of Olympian Oscar Pistorius testified in his murder trial Tuesday that she thought she heard a woman loudly arguing with someone the night the athlete shot and killed his girlfriend, model Reeva Steenkamp. Estelle Van der Merwe, who lives less than 100 yards from Pistorius' house, said she was was awoken by the sound at 1:06 a.m. on Valentine's Day last year. She said she was irritated by the loud voice, and tried to get to sleep by putting a pillow on her head.
SPORTS
February 15, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
SOCHI, Russia - They had spent nearly three hours pouring their hearts across the sticky floor of the smoky basement bar. They had cheered, groaned, cursed, crushed empty cigarette packs in frustration, danced past empty vodka bottles with glee, and chanted in baritone for their beloved Russia. Then they lost. When American T.J. Oshie scored in the eighth round of a shootout to give the U.S. a 3-2 victory over Russia in a first-round Olympic hockey game Saturday night, it was a devastating ending for the several dozen fans crowding into the So Leone sports bar in downtown Sochi.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
The jury in the murder trial of Michael Dunn, accused of shooting an unarmed teenager to death during a dispute over loud music, has reached verdicts on four charges but said on Saturday it could not agree on the top count of first-degree murder. The jury, which is in the fourth day of weighing Dunn's fate, announced its status in a note to  Judge Russell L. Healey late Saturday afternoon. The judge read the jury the so-called dynamite charge, urging them to return to their deliberations and try to resolve their differences.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A jury in Florida returned a split verdict in the case of Michael Dunn, accused of killing an unarmed teenager in a dispute over loud music - a decision that will put the software engineer in prison for the rest of his life but leaves unanswered lingering questions about race, guns and self-defense law. In its fourth day of deliberation Saturday, the jury convicted Dunn, 47, of four charges. But the jury, which included two African American women, one Latino man, an Asian American woman and eight white people, couldn't reach a decision on the charge of first-degree murder in the killing of Jordan Davis, who would have celebrated his 19th birthday Sunday.
WORLD
May 24, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Cops stormed in and shut the place down. Up the stairs and out into the warm spring night the tipsy customers stumbled, along with a gaggle of ladies of the night, various shady characters, the singer and his band. A rustle of umbrage. What's the meaning of this? The police almost apologized. Orders from the Interior Ministry, they said, one of the higher-ups. But one of the customers was also in the Interior Ministry. He pulled out his cellphone and called someone, an even higher higher-up.
BOOKS
September 17, 1995 | Robert Rodi, Robert Rodi is the author of four novels: "Fag Hag," "Closet Case," "What They Did to Princess Paragon" and the forthcoming "Drag Queen" (all Dutton/Plume)
I'm often asked, with regard to gay humor, "Why now?"--as if Oscar Wilde, F. Benson and Noel Coward had been great tragedians. But today I'll choose to interpret the question thus: Why, after so many decades of being famously witty about everything else, are gay people finally pointing satiric fingers at ourselves? The answer, of course, is post-Stonewall liberation. Once Oscar Wilde's "love that dare not speak its name" got double-dared to do so and did, it was only a matter of time before we started making fun of ourselves.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A jury has found Michael Dunn, the Florida man accused of shooting an unarmed teenager to death during a dispute over loud music, guilty of four charges, but the jury was unable to reach a decision on the top count, first-degree murder. Dunn, who is white, fired 10 shots into an SUV, killing Jordan Davis, 17, who was black. The shooting in a convenience store parking lot in Jacksonville erupted after Dunn asked the teenagers in the vehicle to turn down their music. Dunn was charged with first-degree murder, three counts of attempted second-degree murder and one count of firing into a vehicle in the Nov. 23, 2012, shooting.
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