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September 3, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Maybe it's the ongoing success of "Lee Daniels' The Butler," or perhaps just the start of soulful autumnal nights, but something has put us in a jazzy, Louis Armstrong kind of mood. All of which is enough to make one wonder if "Something Wonderful," a long-gestating movie about Louis Armstrong from "Butler" star Forest Whitaker, still has a shot of getting off the ground. The man at the controls says it does. PHOTOS: Forest Whitaker: Career retrospective Whitaker tells The Times that he'd still like to direct and act in the independent production, and that he's been working to develop the script with the veteran screenwriter Ron Bass ("Rain Man," "The Joy Luck Club")
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Maybe it's the ongoing success of "Lee Daniels' The Butler," or perhaps just the start of soulful autumnal nights, but something has put us in a jazzy, Louis Armstrong kind of mood. All of which is enough to make one wonder if "Something Wonderful," a long-gestating movie about Louis Armstrong from "Butler" star Forest Whitaker, still has a shot of getting off the ground. The man at the controls says it does. PHOTOS: Forest Whitaker: Career retrospective Whitaker tells The Times that he'd still like to direct and act in the independent production, and that he's been working to develop the script with the veteran screenwriter Ron Bass ("Rain Man," "The Joy Luck Club")
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Trumpeter Louis Armstrong is universally considered to be the great progenitor of jazz. Stepping out of the collective sound of King Oliver's New Orleans-style ensemble, he established the importance of the soloist, was one of the creators of the notion of improvising new melodies on existing chord changes and virtually invented the elements of jazz singing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2013
New Orleans-based trumpeter Nicholas Payton describes his music under the umbrella of Black American Music (or #BAM for short), in a break from the term "jazz. " But for anyone with an interest in the sound of the genre past, present or future, his talents remain required viewing. A recent turn at the Hollywood Bowl enlivened a night-long tribute to Louis Armstrong, and his 2013 album "#BAM: Live at Bohemian Caverns" shows him in excellent, uncompromisingly inventive form. The Mint, 6010 West Pico Blvd., Los Angeles, 9 p.m. $25, http://www.themintla.com .
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is the Times' jazz writer
Tony Bennett once referred to Louis Armstrong in a way that perfectly encapsulated the importance of Satchmo to American culture. "The bottom line of any country," said Bennett, "is, 'What did we contribute to the world?' We contributed Louis Armstrong." That may seem like a powerful bit of hyperbole to anyone who only envisions Armstrong in his sweating, mugging, super-entertaining persona.
NEWS
January 20, 1991
Cladys (Jabbo) Smith, 82, jazz trumpeter considered a rival of Louis Armstrong's in the 1920s and 1930s. A native of Pembroke, Ga., Smith joined Charlie Johnson's Paradise Band at the age of 17. He recorded with Fats Waller and later for the Brunswick label with a Chicago group, directly competing with Armstrong. He retired from music in the 1950s to work in a car rental agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Danny Barcelona, the longtime drummer with Louis Armstrong and His All Stars, who traveled the world with the legendary jazz trumpeter and played on scores of recordings, including Armstrong's 1964 hit "Hello, Dolly!" has died. He was 77. Barcelona, a resident of Monterey Park, died April 1 of cancer in a convalescent home in San Gabriel. He was surrounded by his family, they said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER, Leonard Feather is The Times' jazz critic
Louis Armstrong is jazz. Not was--is. More than any other artist he has become a synonym for an entire century of an American art form. As trumpeter and no less as singer, he exerted an influence that has carried through to this day. Yet as a human being he was both idolized as a creative genius and reviled as a musical sellout and an Uncle Tom. A complex and enigmatic figure beneath the clowning surface, he drew no arbitrary line between artistry and entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2001 | HOWARD REICH, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
To people around the world, he was the perpetually grinning black jazzman who brought comic relief to films such as "Hello, Dolly" and "High Society." To many jazz musicians who admired his art but loathed his public persona, he was at best a "clown," as trumpeter Miles Davis once called him, and at worst a promoter of a "plantation image," in the words of Dizzy Gillespie. But as the world celebrates the centennial of Louis Armstrong's birth (the actual date was Aug.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
For lovers of early jazz, the discovery of six previously unknown performances by trumpeter Louis Armstrong is akin to the discovery of King Tut's tomb. "A find like this comes along once in a lifetime," said producer Michael Brooks, who ran across the Armstrong sessions serendipitously earlier this year. "Nothing new from this period has been found in 50 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Chris Barton
The Louis Armstrong House and Museum took a step toward further raising its profile by hiring its first curator in David L. Reese. A humble home on 107th Street in Queens, the house was first purchased by the jazz great and his wife when they were newlyweds in 1943, and it was where he died on July 6, 1971. The house was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976, and it was given to the city of New York in 1986 by the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation after his widow, Lucile, died in 1983.  The house was declared a New York City landmark in 1988, and it has been open daily for guided tours since 2003, when it was reborn as a museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2011
George Kirby Kirby excelled as Nat King Cole, Count Basie, Louis Armstrong and even Ella Fitzgerald. Marilyn Michaels Impressions of singers Connie Francis, Judy Garland, Barbra Streisand and Ethel Merman are her forte. Frank Gorshin Gorshin was the first impressionist to become a headliner imitating such stars as Burt Lancaster and George Burns.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2009 | By Scott Martelle
In 1947, jazz great Louis Armstrong got himself a new gadget -- a tape recorder, fresh out on the consumer market. It was a big, boxy machine that he set up in concert halls and jazz joints to record his six-piece All Stars so he could listen to each show in his hotel room and thin out the weak spots for the next gig. Before long, however, this work tool became a plaything -- and, a couple of generations later, a treasure trove for Terry Teachout,...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2008 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Gerald Wiggins, a jazz pianist whose long career embraced numerous recordings with his trio, performances with Louis Armstrong, Benny Carter, Roy Eldridge, Zoot Sims, accompaniment for Lena Horne and Nat "King" Cole, and vocal coaching for Marilyn Monroe, has died. He was 86. Wiggins died Sunday morning at Encino-Tarzana Medical Center, where he had spent the last six weeks. According to his wife, Lynn, Wiggins had been in poor health for months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Danny Barcelona, the longtime drummer with Louis Armstrong and His All Stars, who traveled the world with the legendary jazz trumpeter and played on scores of recordings, including Armstrong's 1964 hit "Hello, Dolly!" has died. He was 77. Barcelona, a resident of Monterey Park, died April 1 of cancer in a convalescent home in San Gabriel. He was surrounded by his family, they said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
For 40 years, from 1947 to 1987, Floyd Levin owned a downtown Los Angeles textile manufacturing company that made tablecloths, aprons, toaster and barbecue covers, and other housewares. But Levin also had an abiding passion for jazz, and for nearly two decades longer than the four he spent at Parvin Manufacturing Co. he had a second career as a jazz journalist and historian.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few years ago, the week of July 4, 2000, was a much anticipated event--the 100th anniversary of the birth of Louis Armstrong. As it turned out, the traditional patriotic image of Satchmo as a Fourth of July baby was a bit off-base. The first slip in accuracy occurred when the commonly accepted birth date of July 4, 1900, turned out to be a year too soon.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1995 | OWEN MCNALLY, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Bing Crosby once called Louis Armstrong "the beginning and the end of music in America." * Crosby's summation of the great cornetist, trumpeter and singer has the ring of Ernest Hemingway's famous statement on Mark Twain: "All modern literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called 'Huckleberry Finn.' " Crosby and Hemingway speak, of course, with some degree of hyperbole, but there is a rich kernel of metaphoric truth in what they say.
NEWS
June 29, 2006
I was appalled, but not surprised, to find Bobby Bland's appearance at Leimert Park listed under the Jazz category on Page E3 [Weekend Forecast, June 22]. Perhaps if the Los Angeles Times assigned writers who knew something about the subject -- jazz in particular -- we readers would get better and more informative coverage of that genre. But, as Louis Armstrong once said when asked "What is jazz?" by a neophyte journalist, he answered, "If you have to ask that question you'll never know what it is!"
NEWS
January 6, 2005
Roy Haynes' 50-plus-year career cuts a broad swath across jazz history. It's been noted that the 78-year-old might be the only drummer alive who can say he's performed with Louis Armstrong, Lester Young, Billie Holiday, John Coltrane and Charlie "Bird" Parker as well as Herbie Hancock, Kenny Garrett and many other artists of today. Not surprisingly then, Haynes' current Grammy- nominated CD is titled "Fountain of Youth." Catalina Bar & Grill 6725 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 8:30 and 10:30 p.m.
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