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Louis Barajas

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NEWS
April 30, 1992 | GEORGE RAMOS
"They call me a hero, but I'm not sure," said Cristal Anguiano. Others, however, have no difficulty in calling the 12-year-old's actions in February heroic. She somehow managed to carry her brother Rafael, 2, to safety after she was shot in the heart outside her family's modest home in South-Central Los Angeles. The bullet was fired in a gun battle between gangs. Now, Cristal is back to playing with her friends and getting ready to return to school.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1994
Louis Barajas has proved author Thomas Wolfe wrong. You can go home again. The 32-year-old tax and financial consultant was uncomfortable with a secure, well-paying job in Newport Beach that came with a nicely appointed office and a view of the Pacific and the benefits of handling the financial portfolios of some of Orange County's wealthy and powerful. He wanted to come back to his old neighborhood in East L.A. and help the working-class folks he grew up with.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1994
Louis Barajas has proved author Thomas Wolfe wrong. You can go home again. The 32-year-old tax and financial consultant was uncomfortable with a secure, well-paying job in Newport Beach that came with a nicely appointed office and a view of the Pacific and the benefits of handling the financial portfolios of some of Orange County's wealthy and powerful. He wanted to come back to his old neighborhood in East L.A. and help the working-class folks he grew up with.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | GEORGE RAMOS
"They call me a hero, but I'm not sure," said Cristal Anguiano. Others, however, have no difficulty in calling the 12-year-old's actions in February heroic. She somehow managed to carry her brother Rafael, 2, to safety after she was shot in the heart outside her family's modest home in South-Central Los Angeles. The bullet was fired in a gun battle between gangs. Now, Cristal is back to playing with her friends and getting ready to return to school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1992 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Louis Barajas had it all: a loving family, nice suburban home and a job at a prestigious firm that paid him handsomely to help wealthy people with their investment portfolios. He worked out of a well-appointed Newport Beach office with a spectacular view of the ocean. But Barajas, 30, was a kid from East Los Angeles who never quite got over a bad case of homesickness. "I missed the tortillas," he said only half-jokingly.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1998
Investing for small-business owners is the topic of a special panel at The Times' second annual Investment Strategies Conference. "Investing and Retirement Issues for Small Business Owners and Entrepreneurs" is scheduled for 10:45 a.m. to noon Feb. 8 at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Times small-business columnist Vicki Torres will moderate.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1999
SATURDAY, MAY 22 7:30 a.m. Exhibit Hall opens, on-site registration begins 8:45 to 10:15 a.m. General Session/Keynote Speaker: Andy Grove, co-founder and chairman, Intel Corp. Hall A 10:45 a.m. to noon Panel 1A: Maximizing 401(k) and IRA Plans Moderator: Paul J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2000 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now, according to the U.S. Postal Service, almost everyone in L.A. is a star--or at least has the address of one. At the behest of supporters of Hollywood, which they say is the most popular part of the city, postal officials on Thursday changed the Los Angeles postmark on letters and packages to Los Angeles/Hollywood. Instead of the customary squiggly postal cancellation lines, five stars with the words "Home of the Stars" will now be used to cancel the postage.
NEWS
February 22, 1999 | IRENE LACHER
Everyone to your corners. The fight for glossy Prada ads is on. Even though we enjoy being a girl, this is the kind of fight we like, which is fortunate because it comes around every few years. It's the battle among magazines duking it out for advertising dollars in L.A., which can only mean one thing--new magazines. After a recent dry spell for L.A. glossies, Los Angeles magazine is finally facing some competition.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2007 | Cyndia Zwahlen, Special to The Times
Every small-business owner wants to be a financial success, but most would balk if they knew the eventual price could be their health and happiness. Unfortunately, that's the bill that comes due for too many. Swamped by endless to-do lists and juggling multiple roles, business owners typically can't seem to find enough hours in the day to get it all done.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1992 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Louis Barajas had it all: a loving family, nice suburban home and a job at a prestigious firm that paid him handsomely to help wealthy people with their investment portfolios. He worked out of a well-appointed Newport Beach office with a spectacular view of the ocean. But Barajas, 30, was a kid from East Los Angeles who never quite got over a bad case of homesickness. "I missed the tortillas," he said only half-jokingly.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1999 | SUZY HAGSTROM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Certified financial planner Louis Barajas of Los Angeles will never forget the 64-year-old dentist who couldn't retire. The dentist had no personal savings because he had always spent surplus income on equipment, training and other improvements. Selling the practice wasn't a feasible option because other dentists weren't interested in acquiring a sole proprietorship based on one man's rapport with his patients.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1998 | VICKI TORRES
It's official. The city of Los Angeles no longer requires home-based businesses to register and pay a $25 fee. The City Council last week rescinded a regulation that had outraged many business owners and spawned two lawsuits. Councilwoman Laura Chick is to be commended for pushing to make it legal to operate a home-based business in the city. And she deserves praise for recognizing that the controversial registration provision served no purpose and for persuading the council to ditch it.
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