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Louis Craine

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June 27, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports and
An unemployed construction worker was sentenced to death today for strangling four women, including two of the 18 Southside Slayer victims. Superior Court Judge Janice Claire Croft imposed the sentence in Compton on Louis Craine, 32, who attorneys portrayed as an illiterate man with a fourth-grade education and an IQ of 69. He was convicted April 26 and jurors at the penalty phase of his trial recommended the death sentence.
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NEWS
November 7, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Convicted killer Louis Craine, who faced death in the gas chamber for the strangulation murders of four women in Los Angeles, died in a hospital in San Rafael. San Quentin Prison officials reported that the 32-year-old illiterate former construction worker died in Marin General Hospital of an undisclosed ailment. Craine was convicted in April and sentenced to death in June for four murders. Two of his victims were counted among 18 Southside Slayer victims.
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NEWS
November 7, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Convicted killer Louis Craine, who faced death in the gas chamber for the strangulation murders of four women in Los Angeles, died in a hospital in San Rafael. San Quentin Prison officials reported that the 32-year-old illiterate former construction worker died in Marin General Hospital of an undisclosed ailment. Craine was convicted in April and sentenced to death in June for four murders. Two of his victims were counted among 18 Southside Slayer victims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1989 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
An illiterate construction worker convicted of four murders, including two "Southside Slayer" killings of prostitutes in South-Central Los Angeles, was sentenced Tuesday to die in the gas chamber at San Quentin. Louis Craine, 32, stared ahead in glum silence as Compton Superior Court Judge Janice Claire Croft rejected a defense plea that would have allowed him to serve life in prison without the possibility of parole. Bodies Discarded Acting on the recommendation of a Superior Court jury that in May recommended capital punishment, Croft said that Craine's "victims fought frantically for their lives . . . and he manually strangled each of them to death and discarded their bodies in abandoned houses, vacant lots and an alley like so much trash."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1989
A jury announced it was deadlocked Wednesday over whether to recommend the death sentence or life in prison without parole for a man convicted of strangling four women, including two of the 18 Southside Slayer victims. But Superior Court Judge Janice Clair Croft refused to declare a mistrial in the penalty phase of the murder trial of Louis Craine, and ordered the jury to resume its deliberations. The jury is trying to decide whether to recommend a death sentence or life in prison without parole for Craine, 32, an unemployed construction worker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1989
A Watts man went on trial for a second time Monday in the murders of five women, including three counted among the 18 Southside Slayer serial killings. A mistrial was declared in August at Louis Craine's first trial after a clerk inadvertently gave deliberating jurors portions of a witness statement they were not supposed to see. In an opening statement Monday in Compton Superior Court, Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1988 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
An unemployed construction worker already facing trial in three murders was charged Friday with two of the much-publicized Southside Slayer killings of young prostitutes in the predominantly black areas of Los Angeles, Police Chief Daryl F. Gates announced. Louis Craine, 31, has been in custody since May 29 after a woman was found slain in Southeast Los Angeles. Evidence gathered in that killing led police to link Craine to the two Southside Slayer deaths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
A Compton Superior Court judge reluctantly declared a mistrial Friday in the case of a Watts man accused of three so-called "Southside Slayer" murders after it was revealed that an exhibit that was not admitted into evidence was mistakenly sent into the jury's deliberation room and seen by six jurors. The error was made by a clerk who included the exhibit, containing remarks made by the suspect's brother, with evidence sent into the jury room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
An unemployed Watts construction worker suspected of three of the so-called Southside Slayer killings testified Tuesday that he confessed to the murders because that is what homicide detectives "wanted to hear."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
The murder trial of a prime suspect in three of the much-publicized Southside Slayer killings began Wednesday with the prosecution telling the jury that the defendant, Louis Craine, had confessed to the murders last year in lengthy interrogations by detectives. The prosecutor, Deputy Dist. Atty.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports and
An unemployed construction worker was sentenced to death today for strangling four women, including two of the 18 Southside Slayer victims. Superior Court Judge Janice Claire Croft imposed the sentence in Compton on Louis Craine, 32, who attorneys portrayed as an illiterate man with a fourth-grade education and an IQ of 69. He was convicted April 26 and jurors at the penalty phase of his trial recommended the death sentence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Jurors on Tuesday recommended the death penalty for convicted serial killer Louis Craine. Two of the murders for which Craine was convicted on April 26 had been linked to the so-called Southside Slayer killings of prostitutes in South-Central Los Angeles. Craine, 31, also had been found guilty on several counts of sexual assault in connection with the strangulation murders. He was acquitted on a fifth count of first-degree murder. Called Relatives 'Liars' An unemployed construction worker from Watts, Craine had confessed to police shortly after his 1988 arrest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1989
A jury announced it was deadlocked Wednesday over whether to recommend the death sentence or life in prison without parole for a man convicted of strangling four women, including two of the 18 Southside Slayer victims. But Superior Court Judge Janice Clair Croft refused to declare a mistrial in the penalty phase of the murder trial of Louis Craine, and ordered the jury to resume its deliberations. The jury is trying to decide whether to recommend a death sentence or life in prison without parole for Craine, 32, an unemployed construction worker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
An unemployed construction worker was convicted on four counts of first-degree murder Wednesday by a Superior Court jury. Two of the murders for which Louis Craine was convicted had been linked to the so-called Southside Slayer killings of prostitutes in South-Central Los Angeles. Craine, 31, was also found guilty on several counts of sexual assault in the strangulation murders. He was acquitted on a fifth count of first-degree murder. Compton Superior Court Judge Janice Claire Croft ordered the jury of six men and six women to return May 8 to decide whether Craine should be given the death penalty or life in prison without parole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
When Louis Craine confessed last year to three murders linked to the Southside Slayer killings of prostitutes, it hardly seemed likely that things could get much gloomier for the unemployed construction worker with an IQ of 69. But that was before his own parents and siblings began talking to police, providing information that could undermine the main thrust of Craine's defense as he seeks to avoid the gas chamber. Their testimony as prosecution witnesses in his serial-murder trial is likely to figure prominently in jury deliberations, expected to begin today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1989
A Watts man went on trial for a second time Monday in the murders of five women, including three counted among the 18 Southside Slayer serial killings. A mistrial was declared in August at Louis Craine's first trial after a clerk inadvertently gave deliberating jurors portions of a witness statement they were not supposed to see. In an opening statement Monday in Compton Superior Court, Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
A Compton Superior Court judge reluctantly declared a mistrial Friday in the case of a Watts man accused of three so-called "Southside Slayer" murders after it was revealed that an exhibit that was not admitted into evidence was mistakenly sent into the jury's deliberation room and seen by six jurors. The error was made by a clerk who included the exhibit, containing remarks made by the suspect's brother, with evidence sent into the jury room.
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