Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLouis D Rubin
IN THE NEWS

Louis D Rubin

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | JOCELYN McCLURG, The Hartford Courant
When eminent Southern literary critic and writing teacher Louis D. Rubin decided to start his own publishing company seven years ago, he did not adopt any airs. The woodshed in his back yard would do just fine. A hand-painted sign on the shed door said: "Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill Editorial Offices: Please Keep Gate Closed Against Dog." What Rubin cared about was helping good young writers--writers who did not have agents, who did not have New York connections--get published.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | JOCELYN McCLURG, The Hartford Courant
When eminent Southern literary critic and writing teacher Louis D. Rubin decided to start his own publishing company seven years ago, he did not adopt any airs. The woodshed in his back yard would do just fine. A hand-painted sign on the shed door said: "Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill Editorial Offices: Please Keep Gate Closed Against Dog." What Rubin cared about was helping good young writers--writers who did not have agents, who did not have New York connections--get published.
Advertisement
BOOKS
December 22, 1991 | Chris Goodrich
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY: A Book About the Building of a Boat by Louis D. Rubin Jr. (Atlantic Monthly Press: $21.95; 394 pp.). In "The Wind and the Willows," Water Rat tells Mole, new to the riverside, that "There is nothing--absolutely nothing --half so much worth doing as simply messing around in boats."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2004 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Frederick R. Karl, a literary scholar known for his mammoth biographies of William Faulkner, Joseph Conrad and other figures, died of kidney disease April 30 in New York City. He was 77. Karl, a professor emeritus of both City College of New York and New York University, wrote or edited more than a dozen books, including major reference volumes on modern English and American fiction and a novel set during World War II.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | ELIZABETH KASTOR, THE WASHINGTON POST
Victims of a too-warm winter and a too-late frost, the peaches were injured again, so last fall Dori Sanders did as she had done before. She left South Carolina and came north to set up tables for Christmas parties and arrange chairs for wedding receptions. It always goes like that. When bad weather hits York County, S.C., you can find her at this small motel near Andrews Air Force Base, Md., in her solid shoes and pink polo shirt with the restaurant logo, saving her farm by lugging furniture.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|