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Louis Dell Olio

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NEWS
February 22, 1993 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES FASHION EDITOR
Who ever thinks about Anne Klein, really? In the mid-'70s, the company introduced mix-and-match sportswear, a concept that changed the development of American designer labels. Like every brilliant idea, this one was simple. Each Anne Klein collection included jackets, skirts and pants that could be worn interchangeably--and virtually all of her New York counterparts adapted the concept as their own.
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NEWS
February 22, 1993 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES FASHION EDITOR
Who ever thinks about Anne Klein, really? In the mid-'70s, the company introduced mix-and-match sportswear, a concept that changed the development of American designer labels. Like every brilliant idea, this one was simple. Each Anne Klein collection included jackets, skirts and pants that could be worn interchangeably--and virtually all of her New York counterparts adapted the concept as their own.
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NEWS
October 30, 1986
Ponytails have always been thought of as casual, but now they're dressing up and going out. And why not? This simple off-the-face style adds a youthful freshness to all kinds of party clothes. Its easy charm makes obviously styled hair for evening look positively stuffy. Ponytails are on fashion runways. At the California Mart's press preview of spring '87 fashions last month, long-haired models in the evening-wear collections tied their hair back with sleek, black ribbons.
NEWS
June 28, 1991 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dazzling fall collection that Louis Dell'Olio designed for Anne Klein was born, he says, out of despair. "I started it when everything in the world was horrid. We had a recession. We were about to go to war in the Persian Gulf. There was no good news," he explains during a day of good news at I. Magnin, Beverly Hills. His bright and beautifully constructed collection receives a huge ovation from the 400-plus invited guests. As he talks, many rush to the dressing rooms to try on the samples.
NEWS
April 25, 1986 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, Times Fashion Editor
Do new clothes have to look new? Do they have to be last word, up to the minute, full of flash and dash? The current thinking is no. Judging from the preview photos of fall fashions to be shown in New York next week, Old Money styles are more bankable than those freshly minted. And good bloodlines in design are as important as in British family trees. Perry Ellis' walking suit, for example, is an update of a standard that was first seen on upper class fashion plates in 1901.
NEWS
January 31, 1986 | ROSE-MARIE TURK
Louis Dell'Olio has produced three Anne Klein collections since his former design partner, Donna Karan, left the firm to go out on her own. Now that he holds the reins by himself, he finds life both changed and unchanged. "The work is the same. You know, the everyday routine, the fitting of the clothes. But doing it on my own is exciting because I make all the decisions. It's never a compromise." Karan's departure, Dell'Olio says, " wasn't like a divorce, it was like leaving home."
NEWS
June 28, 1991 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dazzling fall collection that Louis Dell'Olio designed for Anne Klein was born, he says, out of despair. "I started it when everything in the world was horrid. We had a recession. We were about to go to war in the Persian Gulf. There was no good news," he explains during a day of good news at I. Magnin, Beverly Hills. His bright and beautifully constructed collection receives a huge ovation from the 400-plus invited guests. As he talks, many rush to the dressing rooms to try on the samples.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | SALLY CLARK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
He is one of Seventh Avenue's top designers. But you won't catch him lunching at New York's glamour restaurants. A tuna sandwich at his desk is more like it. The woman next door covets his clothes. So do celebrities whose first names telegraph instant recognition: Oprah and Candice. Yet his name is not as well known as Ralph's (as in Lauren) or Calvin's (as in Klein). He is Louis Dell'Olio, the designer behind the Anne Klein label.
NEWS
February 3, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
Louis Dell'Olio, designer for Anne Klein, was wrapped in a navy cashmere double-breasted suit and Ray-Ban sunglasses, sitting by the pool of the Bel-Air Hotel, contemplating First Ladies. "Barbara Bush made a great first impression. She's put my mother--and everybody's mother--back in style. She's concerned about clothing, but not overly concerned. People like that about her," observed the man whose designs have made the Anne Klein label one of the most financially successful in America. "Mrs.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES FASHION EDITOR
Seventh Avenue saved the best for last, ending a week of fall fashion shows with Geoffrey Beene's collection. His clothes are the place where art meets reality in a balancing act that works better some seasons than others. This time it was just about perfect. The daywear was typically futuristic feeling, with leather-belted jumpsuits under long, hooded coats, and long, body-molded gray tweed jackets over short, deeper gray tweed skirts.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | SALLY CLARK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
He is one of Seventh Avenue's top designers. But you won't catch him lunching at New York's glamour restaurants. A tuna sandwich at his desk is more like it. The woman next door covets his clothes. So do celebrities whose first names telegraph instant recognition: Oprah and Candice. Yet his name is not as well known as Ralph's (as in Lauren) or Calvin's (as in Klein). He is Louis Dell'Olio, the designer behind the Anne Klein label.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES FASHION EDITOR
Seventh Avenue saved the best for last, ending a week of fall fashion shows with Geoffrey Beene's collection. His clothes are the place where art meets reality in a balancing act that works better some seasons than others. This time it was just about perfect. The daywear was typically futuristic feeling, with leather-belted jumpsuits under long, hooded coats, and long, body-molded gray tweed jackets over short, deeper gray tweed skirts.
NEWS
February 3, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
Louis Dell'Olio, designer for Anne Klein, was wrapped in a navy cashmere double-breasted suit and Ray-Ban sunglasses, sitting by the pool of the Bel-Air Hotel, contemplating First Ladies. "Barbara Bush made a great first impression. She's put my mother--and everybody's mother--back in style. She's concerned about clothing, but not overly concerned. People like that about her," observed the man whose designs have made the Anne Klein label one of the most financially successful in America. "Mrs.
NEWS
October 30, 1986
Ponytails have always been thought of as casual, but now they're dressing up and going out. And why not? This simple off-the-face style adds a youthful freshness to all kinds of party clothes. Its easy charm makes obviously styled hair for evening look positively stuffy. Ponytails are on fashion runways. At the California Mart's press preview of spring '87 fashions last month, long-haired models in the evening-wear collections tied their hair back with sleek, black ribbons.
NEWS
April 25, 1986 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, Times Fashion Editor
Do new clothes have to look new? Do they have to be last word, up to the minute, full of flash and dash? The current thinking is no. Judging from the preview photos of fall fashions to be shown in New York next week, Old Money styles are more bankable than those freshly minted. And good bloodlines in design are as important as in British family trees. Perry Ellis' walking suit, for example, is an update of a standard that was first seen on upper class fashion plates in 1901.
NEWS
February 21, 1986 | ROSE-MARIE TURK
When Emma Channing turned romantic on CBS's "Falcon Crest," costume supervisor Shirley Cunningham went looking for jump suits. "She's in love with a truck driver," Cunningham says. "She's spreading her wings, blossoming out." Margaret Ladd (a. k. a. Emma Channing), who had to trade in her delicate, lacy garments for something more sophisticated, "is quite dainty but not thin-thin and not tall," Cunningham observes. "I wanted something that would make her look taller, more statuesque.
NEWS
February 21, 1986 | ROSE-MARIE TURK
When Emma Channing turned romantic on CBS's "Falcon Crest," costume supervisor Shirley Cunningham went looking for jump suits. "She's in love with a truck driver," Cunningham says. "She's spreading her wings, blossoming out." Margaret Ladd (a. k. a. Emma Channing), who had to trade in her delicate, lacy garments for something more sophisticated, "is quite dainty but not thin-thin and not tall," Cunningham observes. "I wanted something that would make her look taller, more statuesque.
NEWS
May 5, 1993
Richard Tyler made Los Angeles fashion history on Monday, becoming the first local designer to be named head of a major New York fashion house. Tyler replaces Louis Dell'Olio as designer of the Anne Klein collection. He will show his first line, for spring '94, in New York next fall.
NEWS
January 31, 1986 | ROSE-MARIE TURK
Louis Dell'Olio has produced three Anne Klein collections since his former design partner, Donna Karan, left the firm to go out on her own. Now that he holds the reins by himself, he finds life both changed and unchanged. "The work is the same. You know, the everyday routine, the fitting of the clothes. But doing it on my own is exciting because I make all the decisions. It's never a compromise." Karan's departure, Dell'Olio says, " wasn't like a divorce, it was like leaving home."
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