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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
Actor-singer Larry Riley has come up with one of the more fascinating nightclub ideas of recent memory. Best known for his award-winning performance in "A Soldier's Story" and "Dreamgirls," Riley steamed into the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel's Cinegrill on Tuesday night with a vigorously energetic tribute to the late rhythm-and-blues great Louis Jordan, perfectly titled "Let the Good Times Roll."
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NEWS
June 22, 2008 | Peggy Harris, Associated Press
Is you is or is you ain't a Louis Jordan fan? The famed 1940s vocalist, band leader and saxophonist from Arkansas gave the world a "jumpin' jive" sound that influenced Ray Charles, B.B. King, Chuck Berry, James Brown and others. Jordan's mix of jazz and blues, playful lyrics and strong rhythms excited audiences and made him among the first black performers to have crossover appeal with whites. Called the "King of Rhythm and Blues," Jordan was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987 and celebrated in the Broadway hit "Five Guys Named Moe."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1990 | JEFF KAYE, Jeff Kaye is a free-lance writer based in London
Nomax, a '90s fellow in blue jeans and white T-shirt, sits hunched over in his chair, drinking and ruminating over a romance gone sour. Old R&B spills out of his modern radio. The deejay reports it's 4:45 a.m. Flash, blam, puff of smoke from the radio, and suddenly five hipsters appear, all spruced in '40s finery. Nomax needs a lesson in the mysteries of life and love, they say, and they're here to give it to him. They break into song as they introduce themselves. They're five guys named Moe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
B.B. King is the first to tell you he's livin' the blues no more. The singer-songwriter-guitarist has sold millions of records and toured all over the world. He's won numerous Grammy and W.C. Handy Awards. Heck, he even owns a chain of nightclubs proudly bearing his name in stylish neon lights. The King of the Blues--who plays with his band Friday at the Galaxy Concert Theatre and Saturday at the Coach House--has paid his dues, and at 74, he could just swing back in an easy chair and relax.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1993 | ROBERT PALMER, Robert Palmer, a contributing editor with Rolling Stone, is based in New Orleans.
Pay attention, this is a quiz: Who holds the all-time record for Top 10 rhythm and blues hits (55) and R&B No. 1s (18)? James Brown? Ray Charles? Fats Domino? Aretha Franklin? Michael Jackson? No way. The envelope, please . . . and the winner is . . . Louis Jordan? Yes, Louis Jordan. You may not know his music, but you probably know the work of some of his fans--Chuck Berry, B. B.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1993
I'm writing to comment about the July 16 review, "Five Guys Named Moe: Thin Book, Huge Party." I've had the pleasure of working with Louis Jordan (1948-1950) in Los Angeles and other cities, and the music I heard and the show I saw that evening was the authentic music from that period, and the show was very complete. When you have a show from the '40s and '50s with that much talent, singing and dancing and a great band doing a superb job playing Jordan's music, well it shouldn't be called "Thin Book, Huge Party."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1993
Regarding "A Guy Named Louis," by Robert Palmer (July 11): I enjoyed Palmer's story about Louis Jordan and the revival of his music in "Five Guys Named Moe." As Louis' manager for eight years, I thought I might clear up a few observations. Chick Webb asked Jordan to leave the band because he thought that Louis had a romantic interest in his young girl singer, Ella Fitzgerald. Jordan went to work with Walter Martin's band at the Elks RendezVous. Walter was a drummer who played the timpani and asked Louis to front the band; that's where the Tympany in the band's name, the Tympany Five, came from.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
B.B. King is the first to tell you he's livin' the blues no more. The singer-songwriter-guitarist has sold millions of records and toured all over the world. He's won numerous Grammy and W.C. Handy Awards. Heck, he even owns a chain of nightclubs proudly bearing his name in stylish neon lights. The King of the Blues--who plays with his band Friday at the Galaxy Concert Theatre and Saturday at the Coach House--has paid his dues, and at 74, he could just swing back in an easy chair and relax.
NEWS
June 22, 2008 | Peggy Harris, Associated Press
Is you is or is you ain't a Louis Jordan fan? The famed 1940s vocalist, band leader and saxophonist from Arkansas gave the world a "jumpin' jive" sound that influenced Ray Charles, B.B. King, Chuck Berry, James Brown and others. Jordan's mix of jazz and blues, playful lyrics and strong rhythms excited audiences and made him among the first black performers to have crossover appeal with whites. Called the "King of Rhythm and Blues," Jordan was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987 and celebrated in the Broadway hit "Five Guys Named Moe."
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for The Times.
Question: What do you call a band that sounds like a mixture of Count Basie, Charlie Parker, Tito Puente, NRBQ and Cab Calloway, but plays with the power and energy, if not the volume, that you might associate with a rock group like Led Zeppelin? Answer: The Royal Crown Revue, a Los Angeles-based septet that offers its own take on what was called Jump Jive. That's a musical style that was popular in the 1940s and was typified by people such as Louis Jordan.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for The Times.
Question: What do you call a band that sounds like a mixture of Count Basie, Charlie Parker, Tito Puente, NRBQ and Cab Calloway, but plays with the power and energy, if not the volume, that you might associate with a rock group like Led Zeppelin? Answer: The Royal Crown Revue, a Los Angeles-based septet that offers its own take on what was called Jump Jive. That's a musical style that was popular in the 1940s and was typified by people such as Louis Jordan.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1993
I'm writing to comment about the July 16 review, "Five Guys Named Moe: Thin Book, Huge Party." I've had the pleasure of working with Louis Jordan (1948-1950) in Los Angeles and other cities, and the music I heard and the show I saw that evening was the authentic music from that period, and the show was very complete. When you have a show from the '40s and '50s with that much talent, singing and dancing and a great band doing a superb job playing Jordan's music, well it shouldn't be called "Thin Book, Huge Party."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1993
Regarding "A Guy Named Louis," by Robert Palmer (July 11): I enjoyed Palmer's story about Louis Jordan and the revival of his music in "Five Guys Named Moe." As Louis' manager for eight years, I thought I might clear up a few observations. Chick Webb asked Jordan to leave the band because he thought that Louis had a romantic interest in his young girl singer, Ella Fitzgerald. Jordan went to work with Walter Martin's band at the Elks RendezVous. Walter was a drummer who played the timpani and asked Louis to front the band; that's where the Tympany in the band's name, the Tympany Five, came from.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1993 | ROBERT PALMER, Robert Palmer, a contributing editor with Rolling Stone, is based in New Orleans.
Pay attention, this is a quiz: Who holds the all-time record for Top 10 rhythm and blues hits (55) and R&B No. 1s (18)? James Brown? Ray Charles? Fats Domino? Aretha Franklin? Michael Jackson? No way. The envelope, please . . . and the winner is . . . Louis Jordan? Yes, Louis Jordan. You may not know his music, but you probably know the work of some of his fans--Chuck Berry, B. B.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1990 | JEFF KAYE, Jeff Kaye is a free-lance writer based in London
Nomax, a '90s fellow in blue jeans and white T-shirt, sits hunched over in his chair, drinking and ruminating over a romance gone sour. Old R&B spills out of his modern radio. The deejay reports it's 4:45 a.m. Flash, blam, puff of smoke from the radio, and suddenly five hipsters appear, all spruced in '40s finery. Nomax needs a lesson in the mysteries of life and love, they say, and they're here to give it to him. They break into song as they introduce themselves. They're five guys named Moe.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
Actor-singer Larry Riley has come up with one of the more fascinating nightclub ideas of recent memory. Best known for his award-winning performance in "A Soldier's Story" and "Dreamgirls," Riley steamed into the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel's Cinegrill on Tuesday night with a vigorously energetic tribute to the late rhythm-and-blues great Louis Jordan, perfectly titled "Let the Good Times Roll."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1999
* Pat Benatar, "Synchronistic Wanderings," Chrysalis/Capitol (boxed set). * Inspectah Deck, "Uncontrolled Substance," Loud/RED/Sony. * B.B. King, "Let the Good Times Roll: The Music of Louis Jordan," MCA. * Misfits, "Famous Monsters," Roadrunner. * No Use for a Name, "More Betterness," Fat Wreck Chords. * Ricky Skaggs, "Soldier of the Cross," Skaggs Family.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Coming This Way: Neil Simon's "Jake's Women" and Cameron Mackintosh's production of "Five Guys Named Moe," a jazz revue focusing on the music of the late Louis Jordan, have joined the previously reported "Six Degrees of Separation" in the next Ahmanson-at-the-Doolittle season, according to a renewal brochure being mailed to subscribers. A fourth slot is undecided. Subscribers also will be able to buy seats to "The Secret Garden" as a bonus option.
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