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NEWS
June 13, 1988 | TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writer
Louis L'Amour, one of modern literature's most prolific novelists whose tales of man's conquest of the Old West enthralled millions of readers from truck drivers to President Reagan, has died of lung cancer. He was 80. L'Amour died late Friday in his Los Angeles home, his publicist said. A North Dakota native who dropped out of high school to wander the world, L'Amour started his career writing Western pulp magazine stories and Hopalong Cassidy novels in the '40s and '50s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2005
JUST hold your horses! While, indeed, Louis L'Amour deserves praise for entertaining millions of readers with his western sagas ["Keeping the Old West Forever Young," Aug. 17], Scott Martelle is plumb loco in claiming that "with L'Amour's death 17 years ago, the western genre has gone stagnant." Maybe that is true with the formulaic romance portion of the genre, but great westerns are being written, including ones about the 19th as well as the 20th centuries. While still telling of cowboys, Indians and cattle drives, these novels have re-created the genre in wondrous ways.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2005
JUST hold your horses! While, indeed, Louis L'Amour deserves praise for entertaining millions of readers with his western sagas ["Keeping the Old West Forever Young," Aug. 17], Scott Martelle is plumb loco in claiming that "with L'Amour's death 17 years ago, the western genre has gone stagnant." Maybe that is true with the formulaic romance portion of the genre, but great westerns are being written, including ones about the 19th as well as the 20th centuries. While still telling of cowboys, Indians and cattle drives, these novels have re-created the genre in wondrous ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2005 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
In the early days, back when Louis L'Amour had to choose between buying food or books, the 10th-grade dropout and part-time hobo wrote poetry. He didn't sell much. So he tried his hand at adventure stories while moonlighting as a Depression-era boxer, roustabout and merchant marine before he caught on with the low-paying pulp magazines.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Louis L'Amour, the novelist of the American frontier whose books continue to entertain presidents and construction workers, left a real mess behind when he died last year. His family is the first to admit how bad it was--a "toxic dump" of maybe a couple tons of papers stacked chaotically on nearly every square inch of the floor and desk of the big room where L'Amour turned out novels and stories almost as fast as the U.S. Mint stamps out quarters.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | WILLIAM KITTREDGE, Kittredge, a novelist and scholar of Western fiction, teaches in the creative writing program at the University of Montana at Missoula
Driving south across Nevada on Highway 95, through the steely afternoon distances, you get the sense that you are in a country where nobody will cut you any slack at all. You are in a version of the American West where you are on your own; the local motto is take care of your own damned self. That's where I was, just south of Tonopah, maybe 150 miles north of Las Vegas, dialing across the radio, when I heard the news that Louis L'Amour was dead of lung cancer at the age of 80.
BOOKS
August 3, 1986 | Don G. Campbell, Campbell is a Times staff writer.
There's prolific, of course, and then there's prolific , and somewhere on the far side of prolific there's Louis L'Amour with more than 85 novels in print, each one of which has sold more than 1 million copies. But far more than the IBM of the cottage industry known as novel writing, the indefatigable L'Amour's literary output is exceeded only by the vastness of his curiosity and the historic and geographic range of that curiosity.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | SUSAN KING, Times Staff Writer
Katharine Ross knows who really won the West: the women. "The men were the dreamers," she was explaining over a lunch of soft-shell crabs at a fashionable Santa Monica restaurant. "The men went West, but it was the women who kept things together, no matter the situation. It was hard. They made an effort to have a house, bring up the children under incredible hardships and were able to draw on reserves of strength which they didn't know they had."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2005 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
In the early days, back when Louis L'Amour had to choose between buying food or books, the 10th-grade dropout and part-time hobo wrote poetry. He didn't sell much. So he tried his hand at adventure stories while moonlighting as a Depression-era boxer, roustabout and merchant marine before he caught on with the low-paying pulp magazines.
BOOKS
December 13, 1987
Concerning the controversy surrounding poetry, I'd like to add a bit of information I received from a county librarian. The county maintains small libraries within many local correctional facilities. A county librarian, who had conducted some research to find out which books the inmates checked out most frequently, told me that, in order of preference, convicts like to read books of poetry, books on calligraphy, and the novels of Louis L'Amour. When I asked how she might account for this, she guessed--and it was only a guess--that perhaps inmates chose books of poetry as their first preference in reading because poems are able to express certain emotions that they themselves feel, and, wishing to express these emotions to a loved one, they might even quote lines during visits or in letters.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | SUSAN KING, Times Staff Writer
Katharine Ross knows who really won the West: the women. "The men were the dreamers," she was explaining over a lunch of soft-shell crabs at a fashionable Santa Monica restaurant. "The men went West, but it was the women who kept things together, no matter the situation. It was hard. They made an effort to have a house, bring up the children under incredible hardships and were able to draw on reserves of strength which they didn't know they had."
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Louis L'Amour, the novelist of the American frontier whose books continue to entertain presidents and construction workers, left a real mess behind when he died last year. His family is the first to admit how bad it was--a "toxic dump" of maybe a couple tons of papers stacked chaotically on nearly every square inch of the floor and desk of the big room where L'Amour turned out novels and stories almost as fast as the U.S. Mint stamps out quarters.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | WILLIAM KITTREDGE, Kittredge, a novelist and scholar of Western fiction, teaches in the creative writing program at the University of Montana at Missoula
Driving south across Nevada on Highway 95, through the steely afternoon distances, you get the sense that you are in a country where nobody will cut you any slack at all. You are in a version of the American West where you are on your own; the local motto is take care of your own damned self. That's where I was, just south of Tonopah, maybe 150 miles north of Las Vegas, dialing across the radio, when I heard the news that Louis L'Amour was dead of lung cancer at the age of 80.
NEWS
June 13, 1988 | TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writer
Louis L'Amour, one of modern literature's most prolific novelists whose tales of man's conquest of the Old West enthralled millions of readers from truck drivers to President Reagan, has died of lung cancer. He was 80. L'Amour died late Friday in his Los Angeles home, his publicist said. A North Dakota native who dropped out of high school to wander the world, L'Amour started his career writing Western pulp magazine stories and Hopalong Cassidy novels in the '40s and '50s.
BOOKS
August 3, 1986 | Don G. Campbell, Campbell is a Times staff writer.
There's prolific, of course, and then there's prolific , and somewhere on the far side of prolific there's Louis L'Amour with more than 85 novels in print, each one of which has sold more than 1 million copies. But far more than the IBM of the cottage industry known as novel writing, the indefatigable L'Amour's literary output is exceeded only by the vastness of his curiosity and the historic and geographic range of that curiosity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1986 | Irv Letofvsky, Terry Atkinson
"Strange Pursuit." Bantam Western Series. I must have been out of town a long time ---- because this is my initial experience with Louis L'Amour. What a spinner of yarns! On the first side, L'Amour himself rambles on about the West and the nature of following the trail. Then an uncredited narrator unfolds the deliciously detailed short story about wily Texas Ranger Chick Bowdrie and his dogged pursuit of the charming and tricky outlaw killer Charlie Venk. the stuff of legends. 1/2
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