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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
If YOU'VE ever gotten angry, I mean really angry, you feel a kinship with “The Incredible Hulk.” First he gets mad, then he gets even, flattening everything in sight. Even being green seems a small price to pay for power like that. The people at Marvel Entertainment also have a soft spot for this problem child of superheroes. They've brought the monster from the id back to the big screen, attempting to reanimate the franchise after 2003's lackluster "The Hulk," directed by Ang Lee. The result is solid and efficient, if unadventurous, illustrating both the lure and the limitations of comic book extravaganzas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
There's little magic to be had from watching "Now You See Me," a splashy, noisy and frankly preposterous action caper about a quartet of illusionists with a Robin Hood complex. For all the talent up on the screen - and one can't fault the performances - the movie just doesn't deliver. This is partly due to the split focus of the script by Ed Solomon and Boaz Yakin & Edward Ricourt (based on a story by Yakin & Ricourt) that rarely allows the viewer sufficient time to side with the good guys or the bad guys - or to even identify which is which.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to cinematic scapegoats, few movies have been hammered like 2010's "Clash of the Titans. " Even though the Warner Bros.Greek god drama grossed nearly $500 million worldwide, the film's last-minute 3-D conversion, done to take advantage of higher stereoscopic ticket prices, sparked uncharacteristically blunt condemnations from industry leaders. DreamWorks Animation's Jeffrey Katzenberg said the film's hasty 3-D makeover "snookered" ticket buyers, while "Avatar" creator James Cameron said of the conversion, "There was no artistry to it whatsoever.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to cinematic scapegoats, few movies have been hammered like 2010's "Clash of the Titans. " Even though the Warner Bros.Greek god drama grossed nearly $500 million worldwide, the film's last-minute 3-D conversion, done to take advantage of higher stereoscopic ticket prices, sparked uncharacteristically blunt condemnations from industry leaders. DreamWorks Animation's Jeffrey Katzenberg said the film's hasty 3-D makeover "snookered" ticket buyers, while "Avatar" creator James Cameron said of the conversion, "There was no artistry to it whatsoever.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2005 | Chris Lee, Special to The Times
BY even the most nitpicky action fan's thrill-me-or-else standards, Frank Martin, the titular transporter in "Transporter 2," possesses just about every attribute on the shoot 'em up movie hero checklist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
There's little magic to be had from watching "Now You See Me," a splashy, noisy and frankly preposterous action caper about a quartet of illusionists with a Robin Hood complex. For all the talent up on the screen - and one can't fault the performances - the movie just doesn't deliver. This is partly due to the split focus of the script by Ed Solomon and Boaz Yakin & Edward Ricourt (based on a story by Yakin & Ricourt) that rarely allows the viewer sufficient time to side with the good guys or the bad guys - or to even identify which is which.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2007
On the mend: Regis Philbin called in to "Live With Regis and Kelly" on Monday to say he plans to return to the syndicated daytime talk show April 26. That would be about six weeks after having triple heart bypass surgery -- and just in time for the May ratings sweeps.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Transporter 2" returns Jason Statham as Frank Martin, the ex-Special Forces operative turned mercenary, a martial arts maestro with world-class high-speed driving skills. Armed with a specially equipped Audi A8 that would strike envy in the heart of James Bond, Martin is a "transporter," prepared to move goods or people with no questions asked and on-time delivery guaranteed.
NEWS
March 25, 2004 | R. Kinsey Lowe
Seeking to tap the lucrative action-thriller-urban genre audience, specialized film label Focus Features is launching Rogue Pictures to handle those broad-appeal films at some remove from the artier, more sophisticated fare offered by the distributor of Academy Award winners "Lost in Translation" and "The Pianist." Dimension Films, the genre division of Miramax Films, is the model for Rogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2005 | Carina Chocano;Kevin Crust
"Unleashed," a howlingly ludicrous new movie directed by Louis Leterrier ("The Transporter") and produced by Luc Besson, stars Jet Li as a human pit bull. Danny is kept on a leash by his loan shark "uncle" Bart (Bob Hoskins), who has trained him since childhood to sic delinquent debtors when his metal collar comes off. On a routine intimidation visit to a Glasgow antiques dealership, Danny meets a blind piano tuner named Sam (Morgan Freeman), who immediately likes him.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
If YOU'VE ever gotten angry, I mean really angry, you feel a kinship with “The Incredible Hulk.” First he gets mad, then he gets even, flattening everything in sight. Even being green seems a small price to pay for power like that. The people at Marvel Entertainment also have a soft spot for this problem child of superheroes. They've brought the monster from the id back to the big screen, attempting to reanimate the franchise after 2003's lackluster "The Hulk," directed by Ang Lee. The result is solid and efficient, if unadventurous, illustrating both the lure and the limitations of comic book extravaganzas.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2005 | Chris Lee, Special to The Times
BY even the most nitpicky action fan's thrill-me-or-else standards, Frank Martin, the titular transporter in "Transporter 2," possesses just about every attribute on the shoot 'em up movie hero checklist.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2007 | John Horn
"The Heartbreak Kid's" meager opening (it grossed just $14 million, not even winning the weekend) wasn't the kind of bellwether Hollywood was looking for. Over the next several months, the studios will flood the multiplex with a dozen other prominent (and often pricey) remakes. The thinking behind the remake is pretty straightforward, but the fact is, remakes are far from a sure thing. For every "3:10 to Yuma" hit remake, there's an "All the King's Men" dud.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2005 | R. Kinsey Lowe, Times Staff Writer
Business at the nation's theaters perked up as "Monster-in-Law" struck a chord with audiences over the weekend, opening at No. 1 with an estimated $24 million, New Line Cinema reported Sunday. Bolstered by a solid showing of $20.9 million for the Will Ferrell soccer-dad comedy "Kicking & Screaming," the weekend tally for all movies was up 18% over last weekend, according to box office tracking firm Nielsen EDI Inc.
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