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Louis Naidorf

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2000 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Architect Louis M. Naidorf's retirement after commencement ceremonies this weekend from Burbank's Woodbury University ended a lifetime of drawing, teaching and managing that shaped the Los Angeles skyline and influenced generations of architects. During a career that began in 1950, Naidorf gained acclaim for his designs--such as the famed Capitol Records building--that fused aestheticism and functionalism.
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NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
The Hollywood Millennium project, which will plant two massive skyscrapers in the heart of Hollywood, got a green light from the L.A. City Council on Wednesday , reports The Times' Kate Linthicum. The news surely came as a disappointment to opponents who've worried that the buildings would sit too close to a fault line and that their tenants and visitors would clog traffic . Some have also fretted that the Millennium skyscrapers would trump the Capitol Records building. “The proposal includes more than four acres of high-rise luxury condos, offices, bars, boutique hotel rooms, restaurants and a vast fitness center, all encased in private towers so tall they will dwarf its centerpiece, the Capitol Records building,” Laurie Becklund wrote in an Op-Ed arguing against the project in March.
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OPINION
July 17, 2013 | By Louis Naidorf
I had this assignment to do a small building in Hollywood. It was my first job to start from scratch, totally mine. I was 24. You may have heard of the building. It's the Capitol Records building, and no, it does not intentionally look like a stack of records. A lot of forces led to that design. Other ideas had cropped up, but a circular building made a lot of functional sense. I figured that the building would have neighboring structures developed over time on each side, so I thought that if it were a circular building, it would preserve views for everyone inside it. INTERACTIVE PANORAMA: Paul McCartney gets his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in front of Capitol Records building I've been stunned over the years that there is still a vacant parking lot next to Capitol Records.
OPINION
July 17, 2013 | By Louis Naidorf
I had this assignment to do a small building in Hollywood. It was my first job to start from scratch, totally mine. I was 24. You may have heard of the building. It's the Capitol Records building, and no, it does not intentionally look like a stack of records. A lot of forces led to that design. Other ideas had cropped up, but a circular building made a lot of functional sense. I figured that the building would have neighboring structures developed over time on each side, so I thought that if it were a circular building, it would preserve views for everyone inside it. INTERACTIVE PANORAMA: Paul McCartney gets his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in front of Capitol Records building I've been stunned over the years that there is still a vacant parking lot next to Capitol Records.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
The Hollywood Millennium project, which will plant two massive skyscrapers in the heart of Hollywood, got a green light from the L.A. City Council on Wednesday , reports The Times' Kate Linthicum. The news surely came as a disappointment to opponents who've worried that the buildings would sit too close to a fault line and that their tenants and visitors would clog traffic . Some have also fretted that the Millennium skyscrapers would trump the Capitol Records building. “The proposal includes more than four acres of high-rise luxury condos, offices, bars, boutique hotel rooms, restaurants and a vast fitness center, all encased in private towers so tall they will dwarf its centerpiece, the Capitol Records building,” Laurie Becklund wrote in an Op-Ed arguing against the project in March.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2000 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Architect Louis M. Naidorf's retirement after commencement this weekend from Burbank's Woodbury University ended a lifetime of drawing, teaching and managing that shaped the Los Angeles skyline and influenced generations of architects. During his architectural career that began in 1950, Naidorf gained acclaim for his designs--such as the famed Capitol Records building--that fused aestheticism and functionalism.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
When he was a young architect in the early 1950s, Lou Naidorf of Welton Becket Associates was given the chance to design the Capitol Records Tower, today one of Hollywood's boldest landmarks. The world's first completely circular office building, Capitol Records was shaped to resemble a stack of 45-r.p.m. platters topped by a symbolic stylus. The tower's simple metaphor was deliberately designed to create an instant presence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1990
Woodbury University's architecture program will take on a new staff design with the appointment of veteran architect Louis Naidorf as chairman. The architect, whose work ranges from architecture and urban design to research and design methods, succeeds Donald Conway. Naidorf, 61, who will take over the post June 18, is an architect at the Santa Monica architecture firm Ellerbe Becket and will continue working there part time.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2003 | Christopher Reynolds
His name may not be a household word, but just check the list of Los Angeles buildings that architect Welton Becket put up between 1933 and his death in 1969. The Music Center downtown, the Capitol Records building and the Cinerama Dome in Hollywood, much of Century City, the Beverly Hilton, the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium -- all of these (and hundreds more, from Honolulu to Havana) bear the Becket firm's name. He collaborated on LAX as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2000 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Architect Louis M. Naidorf's retirement after commencement ceremonies this weekend from Burbank's Woodbury University ended a lifetime of drawing, teaching and managing that shaped the Los Angeles skyline and influenced generations of architects. During a career that began in 1950, Naidorf gained acclaim for his designs--such as the famed Capitol Records building--that fused aestheticism and functionalism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2000 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Architect Louis M. Naidorf's retirement after commencement this weekend from Burbank's Woodbury University ended a lifetime of drawing, teaching and managing that shaped the Los Angeles skyline and influenced generations of architects. During his architectural career that began in 1950, Naidorf gained acclaim for his designs--such as the famed Capitol Records building--that fused aestheticism and functionalism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1990
Woodbury University's architecture program will take on a new staff design with the appointment of veteran architect Louis Naidorf as chairman. The architect, whose work ranges from architecture and urban design to research and design methods, succeeds Donald Conway. Naidorf, 61, who will take over the post June 18, is an architect at the Santa Monica architecture firm Ellerbe Becket and will continue working there part time.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
When he was a young architect in the early 1950s, Lou Naidorf of Welton Becket Associates was given the chance to design the Capitol Records Tower, today one of Hollywood's boldest landmarks. The world's first completely circular office building, Capitol Records was shaped to resemble a stack of 45-r.p.m. platters topped by a symbolic stylus. The tower's simple metaphor was deliberately designed to create an instant presence.
REAL ESTATE
May 3, 1987
Two of Las Vegas' biggest players are betting $43 million that their city is ready for a new image. Nevada's tallest office building, the 18-story First Interstate Tower will open Monday as the first phase of Hughes Center, a 25-acre complex that could include as many as six other office buildings. The tower, the first major office building constructed in Las Vegas in 15 years, is a joint venture of Howard Hughes Properties, a division of Summa Corp., and First Interstate Bank of Nevada.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1992 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County supervisors Tuesday approved spending $12.3 million to buy the site of the future Chatsworth courthouse, despite longstanding opposition from residents of neighborhoods nearby. Four of the five supervisors were unswayed by more than two hours of testimony before the board, which included a San Fernando resident's claim that building a county courthouse in her community "ruined our city."
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